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Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (July-Dec. 1909)"

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MR. HENEYS SALARY THE MOTOR HU1 

LATEST SOCIETY AND SUMMER RESORT NEWS 




Grlndlng-room In one of Walter Baker & Co.'s Mills 

The special value of the Walter Baker Cocoa lies in the fadt that not only is it a perfectly pure artKe, 
with a most delicious flavor, made by a scientific blending of the best beans grown in different parts of 
world, but it is ground to an extraordinary fineness, being driven in the last stage through a sieve with ten 
thousand meshes to the square inch, which is the only legitimate way of making it as soluble as possible. 



52 



HIGHEST AWARDS IN 
EUROPE AND AMERICA 



f 



Walter Baker & Co. Ltd. 



Established 1780 



DORCHESTER, MASS. 




The Elks Western Roundup 



Illustrated Pages of Interest to All Elks 



A Navy for the Pacific 

By U. S. Senator George C. Perkins 



Lucky Boy 

The Story of Nevada's Latest Stampede 



Thompson's Truthful Graveyard 

By Ellis Parker Butler, Author of "Pigs is Pigs" 



Men and Women of the Weft 

Sixteen Pages of Timely Portraits of Those Who 
Are Making History Today 



FIVE RATTLING GOOD SHORT STORIES. 
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goes with every sale. 

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L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 




512 Market Street 



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Branches— Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Spokane. 




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Phone Kearny 3872 134-136-138 Front St.. San Francisco 



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Your inspection is invited to the most 
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EVER SHOWN IN THIS CITY 



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1432 Fillmore Street 958 Broadway. Oakland 



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1400 to 1480 Fourth St., San Francisco. Telephone Market 3014 
Private Exchang-e Connecting- all Departments 




sJtN p S§?? ,8e ® 



' 5(iJ 5C 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. LXXVIil 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 3, 1909 



Ni. 1 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office— 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



The Good Government League might well look the 

Simpson-Hornick bunch in the eye avid say, "And you, two 
brutes !" 

That dreadful thing is to happen again. The mayors 

of cities must make Fourth of July orations, and we must listen 
to them. 

If the Senate would only adjourn, we might leave things 

around again without fear of their being appropriated in the 
night to pay duty with. 

The Chinaman who is supposed to have killed Elsie Sigel 

is one who was reported as "completely Christianized." Better 
have left bad enough alone. 

Taft says that he likes a ball game next to golf, and that 

he is quite a pitcher himself. Ho might practice tossing out 
the Aldrich tariff with a down curve. 

Doctor Elliott's selection of the best fifty books sounds 

like a funeral oration delivered without the accompaniment of 
Bowers or music. The gent has a decidedly sombre cast of 
thought. 

Lipton still expects to get that cup. Too bad, old man, 

but the boys are too much for you. You are a good sport and 
never say die, and if it weren't in the family we would sa\ "gum] 
luck to you !" 

In five weeks most of the schools will again be open, and 

the parents are saving up nickels and dimes to pay for the in- 
evitable change in books. Isn't there sonic way to stop the graft 
of the book companies? 

The auditorium tor conventions and big municipal festi- 
vals is to be. The News Letter ideas appeal, even if the muni- 
cipality has to delegate the doing of tilings 10 private pari 

warn of initiative. Great is the public pi 

San Francisco cannot afford to allow its comm 

house trust to stifle competition. Free trade with the country 
districts means cheaper products for the citizen and more profit- 
able dealings for the fanner. Competition always spelle 

peri I \ . 

Meanwhile the canal work goes right on, and the croakers 

have stepped croaking. Somebody must have slipped a cog in 
the publicity bureau. Maybe the source of the mazun 
given out or the infliction of a French expert who parted his 
Dame in the middle has effectually killed the opposition. 

The dust foundry and noise mill on the comer of Grant 

avenue and Market and O'FarreU streets goes right on produc- 
ing. The high winds of this week have made it especially dis- 
agreeable. Cannot Mr. Michael Casey induce the con; 
to use electricity instead of the evil smelling donkey engine? 

It is said that Peary's "dash" to the North Pole, which 

usually is so dashv that it consists in crawling along with a few 
mangy dogs and lumbering Laplanders at the rate of ten to 
fifteen miles a day, has been entirely successful, and that he is 
just now busy painting it red. white and blue as a Fourth of July 
ed States. Thai is about all the discovery of the 
pole will amount to. 



Broughton Brandenburg has been released, and was at 

once re-arrested on a charge of kidnapping. Brandenburg said 
all the time that he was being persecuted by high political power, 
and the development of his case proves his statement. 

Mr. Heney says that he will win. out on an Independent 

ticket on ho basis of two to one. Not if jury results count for 
anything. \ 'a have an idea that Mr. Heney is a stuffed prophet 
with the stuffing all knocked out of him. 

Professor See. of the naval observatory at Mare Island, 

announces that the moon is approaching the earth at the rate 
of a quarter of an inch a year. When the dread day of actual 
contact arrives, our posterity of that incomputable future will 
not be able to plead absence of warning. 

The wages of sin is death, and Elsie Sigel, it will be 

remembered, was sinning when she wrote love letters to two 
Chinaman lovers at the same time. The whole affair is too 
horrible to dwell upon, and a little caution by parents, who have 
enthusiastic daughters in a religious way, will save many tears. 

Pierpont Morgan and his assoi iates gave up the right, to 

build certain railroads in China, which included the possession 
and exploitation of valuable coal binds, about six years ago. Now, 
the same syndicate will loan the English and the Chinese the 
money wherewith to build the roads. In the end they will own 
them without all the intermediate worry. 

The people want shoes free of duty: the shoe manufac- 
turers state that they want all duties on shoes removed. The 
Senate not only continues the duty, bul proposes to increase it. 
Where does the infant industry plea come in? Plainly some 
one is making s profit or duty-protected hides, and that some- 
body had a drag on the Senators. r 'h ! What's the use? 

The Mauretania accomplished the trip across the Atlantic 

two weeks ago in I days, IS hours and 11 minutes, beating her 
own time hv fifty minutes. She averaged 26.88 knots an hour. 
Tt is not expected that a ferry boat should make anything like 
such speed, but mention of the improvement in navigation is 
made in the hope that the DOnogenarians in charge of our ferry 
traffic may make up their minds to consider improvements in time 
before the present generation has all died out. The Sausalito 
ferry time table belong!) in the dark ages of transportation. 

-The tickless clock has appeared. Not only does it not 

tick, hut it never needs winding, as it is operated hv ore- dry cell 
battery. For twenty-five cents, i d. the timekeep 

he run for three years. We arc progressing rapidly. What with 
horseless carriages, wireless telegrams, tickless clocks and the 
numerous other eliminations of superfluous mechanisms in 
prospect, an aire seems to be at hand when most things will be 
done bv pressing a button. The glittering dream of a workless 
age. however, so dear to 'he hearts of countless demagogues, is 
dissipated by these inventions, as the field of industrial endeavor 
is hut broadened, and 90ciety was never 90 determined that, if a 
man will not work neither shall he eat. as today. 

Daniel J. Keefe. Commissioner of Immigration, at 

ent in this city, states that a large proportion of the immigrants 
arriving in the United States are from Southern Italy, and are of 
verv inferior class. The number arriving from Northern Italy, 
who are much superior, is small. The American people will 
day to the evils. of admitting hordes of the lowest 
European races. The evils are already manifest in the Black- 
Hand - nd other criminal organizations which baffle our 
police. Many thinking Americans are in favor of restricting the 
inflow altogether. Perhaps such ideas are too radical, but at all 
events the emigration laws at present are altogether too lax. 



On the morning of June 24th, the 
W. J. Bartnett, Builder, daily papers made the announce- 
ment upon telegraphic advices from 
New York that Walter J. Bartnett had succeeded in realizing for 
the good of thirteen thousand depositors another of those "im- 
possible dreams" of which we made some mention in our issue of 
April 24th. just two months before its accomplishment. We 
trust their information is correct, and that soon the scars of the 
Safe Deposit failure will be forgotten in the general rejoicing 
over its restored solvency. 

Thus are Bartnett's labors bearing fruit to the vast benefit 
of thousands of poor people. Indeed, we claim some of the 
credit, for has not this strong man needed encouragement upon 
his lonelv and courageous wav? 



Past. 



Time was, after the Western Pacific plan had 
just been accomplished, when every one clamored 
for a nod of recognition from this new power 
among the great builders of the West. And foremost among 
these clamorers were our leading prominent citizens by profes- 
sion who boasted, one and all. that they had the distinction of 
his friendship. Whenever there was a particularly difficult piece 
of public-spirited work to be done, such as the great plan for 
haxbor improvement, where some one was needed to work his 
head off at his own expense, and they could get the credit, these 
same professional prominent citizens used to hasten to Bartnett 
and appoint him general work-horse of the outfit. Then the dark 
days came. The Safe Deposit Company failed, and clever schem- 
ers in the Colton will contest, with the help of the excited daily 
press, thrust the odium upon Bartnett. The others involved in 
the failure were not worth ruining, but he was, for he was a 
power; he stood in their way, and fate had played momentarily 
into their hands. Then where were our professional prominent 
citizens? Like the girl Ehoda, of trie erstwhile popular 
song, who conducted a tea house in a pagoda until she 
married an earl, and then promptly forgot and used to 
ask what a pagoda was, these same worthies hastened in 
a panicky manner to assure their friends, who only needed one 
word of belief in Bartnett to prevent them from joining the 
popular hue and cry against him, that they scarcely knew him at 
all, that he was merely a casual acquaintance whom they had 
met on gome committee or another, etc., etc. Bah! Of such 
poor stuff is the loyalty of the average man, particularly the aver- 
age professional prominent citizen! Small wonder that the 
News Letter claims credit for its support during the long months 
when this man was deserted by all save one or two real friends 
of his boyhood, his devoted and untiring young attorneys, and 
the half-dozen loyal Eastern men of wealth who. unlike our local 
gentry of that ilk, were not afraid to put their dollars into a 
bond for his release. 

How much basis of fact there really was in the Colton charge, 
upon which Bartnett was convicted in the fever of excitement 
over the bank failure, may be readily imagined by comparing 
the outcome of the Treadwell case this week, in which Treadwell 
and Bartnett were jointly indicted. Our friend, Mr. Assistant 
District Attorney William Hoffl Cook, after being closeted with 
Dalzell Brown over Saturday and Sunday, appraising the best 
that Brown had been able to testify in the ease, actually arose 
at the opening of court Monday morning, and. mirabile clictu. 
admitted that "in the performance of his duties as assistant dis- 
trict attorney, and in the furtherance of justice" he had over- 
reached himself and fallen on his face, or words to that effect, 
and asked that the charge be dismissed, and the jury be dis- 
charged, both of which requests the court granted with alacrity. 
The truth of the matter is, that this case was as strong against 
Treadwell and Bartnett as was the other against Bartnett, but 
Mr. Cook had lost his great asset, pu'ulic excitement. The 'pub- 
lic, through Bartnett's work in the East, is no longer cryino- for 
blood, and juries are now capable of weighing evidence dispas- 
sionately. The depositors and stockholders are now filled with 



new hope and growing confidence. They are asking themselves 
if they did not perhaps jump at conclusions in the bank cases. 
Hence the loss of Hoff's goat. 

Bartnett is succeeding where the average man thought suc- 
cess impossible. He is succeeding because he studies facts, and 
has had no time to listen to gossip or to the howls of his detrac- 
tors. His conscience is clear, or he could not work with such 
compelling force for the very people who once thought him their 
enemy. If Bartnett were a wrong-doer who can think for a mo- 
ment that he could undertake and accomplish this stupendous task 
of rehabilitation for depositors and stockholders? When success 
has again perched upon his banner, our friends, the professional 
prominent citizen, will come flocking back to nestle alongside. 
Then, indeed, will his victory be complete ! 



But as yet the success of his work in the East has 
Future. probably not been actually accomplished. Prob- 

ably there is still much to do. Possibly obstacles 
may arise which will even defeat its accomplishment. But 
whether success or failure attend them, let us not forget the 
great lesson of his labors — courage in adversity. When one 
thinks of the strong heart of this man, weighed down with an 
unjust conviction uoon his shoulders, who has yet been the one 
constructive force developed out of the thousands of people 
involved in the bank failure, one does not wonder that he is 
showing the strength to move mountains. Let us encourage 
him and hope with him in order that by our influence his work of 
public devotion may the more easily be perfected. Let us cease 
nni' detraction of everything connected with the bank and make 
up our minds that those who are planning its rehabilitation know 
more about it than we do, and that if they say its assets are good, 
we will agree with them. Let us, above all, hope that the future 
may preserve Bartnett and restore him to his former effective- 
ness for the good of California. Under the fire of unjust accu- 
sation and enveloped in the smoke of detraction and slander he 
has pursued his task as he saw it with unshaken courage and 
resistless fervor. Mav full success reward his efforts. 



Every organization of representa- 
Persecution of Calhoun, tive men in San Francisco has at 
some time or other voiced its opin- 
ion as to the persecution of Mr. Patrick Calhoun. From the big 
financial organization to the improvement club and the labor 
unionite, the voice has been heard, and it is without a doubt true 
that those bodies representing the capital and the industry 
creating class have boldly stated their views. 

A mouthing proletariat, composed of anarchist laborers, and 
led by discharged emplovees of the street car company, is mar- 
shaled as THE PEOPLE, behind, or being led by, the Spreck- 
els-Phelan-Heney cabalists. As against these we find every re- 
spectable body in San Francisco arrayed in protest against the 
further persecution of Mr. Calhoun and the further waste of the 
city's funds in prosecution which cannot convict. 

Every one in San Francisco is cognizant of the fact that 
the prosecution has expended every possible effort to convict ; 
that it has brought, forward all of its evidence and that it has 
fired the last shot in its locker. 

Then why continue the useless straggle? Why allow the 
useless struggle to continue. Mr. Calhoun is vindicated by the 
verdict of the jury, and the prosecution has been discomfited. 

It is high time for the big commercial, manufacturing, civic 
and industrial organizations composed of patriotic citizens to 
stop the prosecution by the very weight of numbers in protest. 
A mass meeting of the solid citizenship of the town, of the men 
who are responsible for its financial strength and its industrial, 
of its investors and its financiers, should be called, and the array 
of names should be used to call a halt in the senseless war on a 
man, with city funds, to satisfy a private spite. 

Now is the time and the hour for the men who are the ar- 



.TriA- 3. 1909 



and California Advertiser 



biters of the fate of San Francisco to say just what they want 
done, and to say it in no uncertain tone. The prosecution is in- 
sisting in the continTianee of a fratricidal strife to satisfy private 
hate at public expense, and its only backing is the mob that feeds 
at the table of the men who evolve ideas and who are responsible 
for the Fact of San Francisco's very existence. 

Without Calhoun and without his friends and the capitalistic 
anil industry creating class, San Francisco, after the fire, had 
not been. Is it not about time to remember this? 

One of the quest ions which the impartial observer has been 
asking himself is: how long would Heney have kept the jury out 
had it stood ten to two for conviction.- and if Heney had no know- 
ledge of the actual stand of the jury, why did he ask to have it 
discharged ? This is one of the very best of reasons for the belief 
that is current that the prosecution had accurate knowledge of 
the case at all times as it stood before the jury, and that the dis- 
missal was a successful move to prevent the jury from coming 
to a decision that would be favorable to Mr. Calhoun. The one 
•fact remains that Mr. Calhoun was practically exonerated. The 
continuance of the farce of trial when all must result the same, is 
irrefutable evidence that the case against Mr. Calhoun is one 
of persecution, pure and simple, prompted by people who have 
social and business grudges to satisfy. 

Let the commercial and industrial bodies act, and impose their 
will, and stop the persecution at once and give back to the city a 
period of prosperity and plenty. 

The Good Government League sleuth department has achieved 
lasting ill-fame for itself by practicing a little trick that will do 
more to show up Phelan and Spreckels as designing politicians, 
pure and simple, than anything else that has happened in a long 
and sinful existence as a factor in purity in Government methods. 

The marking of every return envelope by a cabalistic sign under 
the stamp is an old and threadbare trick, and it has often beer 
employed by politicians and by advertisers, and even by green 
goods men who wished to identify replies received from parties 
who did not wish to give their names, for fear of arrest. 

The trick is an old one and a dirty one, and its use by the Good 
Government League, so-called, stamps it as one of the agem ii - 
for bad Government. The fact that two of Burns' special 
were at work in the rooms stamps disapproval on Spreckels and 
Phelan. The fact that it is reported that Mr. Spreckels' private 
Secretary is supposed to have had a hand in the G mi of 

the affair makes the whole thing doubly suspicious ami will go 
far to remove many friends from the graft prosecution who have 
steadfastly believed that the prosecution was conducted by earnest 
and honest men. 



It has been specifically denied by the 
Technical Mr. Heney. prosecution that Mr. Prar 

Heney was employed by the Govern- 
ment at the same time that he was being ased by Mr. Spn 

as assistant district attorney. Ii is now -hewn that these denials 

are false by the record-: that have been placed in the hands of Mr. 
Calhoun's attorneys by the State Department at Washington. 

Not only are these facts demonstrated, but i; is patent 
that the Roosevelt administration, and Mr. Bonaparte, mai 
point to pay Mr. Heney large sim< of monev. after his I 
labors had ceased, and that his name was kept on the salary 

roll as a Government official long after he was supposed to have 
denied i mnei m with the office of Mr. Bonaparte. 

It is shown that Mr. Hem v was one of the pampered pets of 
the President, and that Mr. Roosevelt and Bonaparte connived 
that administration money, as well as men. might be borrowed 
in the persecution, not onlv of Mr. Calhoun and Mr. Ilarriman 
and their friends, hut as gifts practically out of hand and without 
warrant of law. Either Mr. Heney was in the Government em- 
ploy at the time specified, or else he has taken Government money, 
without rendering any service or account therefor. 

Rut the main point in the controversy is not her. - 
the public is concerned. Again we arc face to face with ir 
that will no; stand the Light Mr. Calhoun has so far 
how to take care of himself, and will know how to take 
bis interests, and the concern of the public is centered in ; ~ 
somebody has been pot J purist, who is no; 

accepting enormous amounts of money for purposes that are not 
divulged, and which are apparently not connected with tfai 
crnment's work. 

Beyond this there shines like a bright accusing light the fact 



that the persecution or prosecution, whatever you may choose to 
call it, matters little, has always dinned it in the ears of the 
public that the Calhoun defense was hiding behind arrays 
of technicalities, and that it dare not come out in the open for 
a free and honest fight. The contention of Mr. Heney's defenders 
is, that he was not an official of the United States when he ac- 
cepted a salary in payment for duties that he did not perform. 
If he did perform duties for the salary, then surely he was an 
official of the United States, and the Constitution of the State 
of California forbids an officer of the United States or of any 
other State holding office in tin 1 Slate. There is a provision that 
forbids the holding of two offices, as well. The technical friends 
of Mr. Heney are hiding behind a technical construction of what 
constitutes an officer of the Government. It is based on whether 
there is any difference between tweedle-dum and tweedle-dee. Be- 
tween assistant to the Attorney General or Special Prosecutor 
Under Pay of the Attorney General's office. The public will 
see little in the technical construction of Mr. Heney's friends. 
The fact remains that he has had enormous sums of money for 
doing spite work for those high in office, and that he has re- 
ceived this money, either as an officer of the Government duly ac- 
credited, or as an agent to carry out the vengeances of Roosevelt 
and of his petty imitator, Mr. Rudolph Spreckels of San Fran- 
cisco. 



THE MODERN BUCCANEER— TEE COMMISSION 



The Retailer 
and Peddleb. 



MERCHANT. 

After the toll of the transportation 
company has been paid, the "dip" of 
the weigher has been exacted and 
the charge of the teamster is settled, 
the consignment is now ready for the inspection and the pur- 
chaee of the retailer and the peddler. At two ami three o'clock 
in Hie morning, the prices are the highest and the offerings are 
the choicest. Retailers and peddlers. Chinese and Caucasian, 
are abroad on purchase bent. By daylight, the market is swept 
clean of everything except the over-stock and the damaged pro- 
duce and very inferior stock. Before evening, the peddler who 
cries his wares out from wagons, in the Btreets, has cleaned this 
-int. loo. The business of the day with tin modem buccaneer 
is at an end. 



After hours, the book-keeper works 

Tin; Pi 3UFFEEB. ami. while are being 

hustled from i B to eommis- 

-ion house ami sale< an- being made, the inking. 

It i< in 'h'- shuffle of trade when t> 
some more hard knocks. The trustful orchardisi has con 
one hundred boxes of fan. i r and agent. Ten 

of them go at the dollar and then some ten more at ninety cents. 
ten at seventy and the balance at sixty-five. 



The return to the farmer is made 
Return to out something like this, and is a 

inr Farmer. work of 

A Qreenone, hi Act 'i with N. 0. S< ruple if- Go. 

By pm boxes of 

Dr. To freight J 

To drayage 2.00 

To 5 per cent commission 3. 

To balance I 

In this game the consignee h.i= been clearly defrauded ■ 

and this is a mildly piratical report. In a case of this 
kind the buccaneer has been overlooking his hind. 

The pirate did not "find" a few da- s -t and 

deduct from the Hint. It is seldom that they fail to 

darlv if they happen to be in need of the money 
for that particular day. Then we have the bold pirate who would 
have returned tl as having been sold at fifty cents a 

box and charged up several damaged boxes besides. Eggs are 
the most popular field for the commission house grafter. A case 




San Francisco News Letter 



July 3, 1909 



holds thirty dozens, and it is easy to discover one, two or even 
three dozen broken ones in each case. The same little piece of 
figment holds good in the case of chickens, and it is astonishing 
how many hens, leaving the ranch in robust condition, succumb 
to heart failure on the cars. Tt is presumed that the unusual 
noise affects their nerves, with a consequent reflex action on the 
heart. There are always a number of unfortunate victims of 
cardiac disease when the coops arrive at the commission house 
door. 

Potatoes and other produce that will keep are popular with 
the commission house grafter. They are sold always at the most 
favorable price, and the returns are always made upon the very 
lowest possibb quotations. The peach game described above ap- 
plies to potatoes and other produce, and in fact is one of the 
methods that is happily useful in all lines. The commission 
merchant holds up the prices, not for the fanner, but for him- 
self. He is always fearful of glutting and breaking the market. 
If it were true that he is running an honest business, he would 
not care how the market turned as long as the goods were sold, 
and in his narrowness he refuses to see that if a line of cars 
from here to Stockton were to unload produce here for twenty- 
four hours, although it would reduce prices, the entire consign- 
ment would have disappeared in the public's insatiable maw in 
the succeeding eighteen hours. If the commission man were an 
honest man he would make more money in this way than by stab- 
bing whole steamer loads of Stockton and Lodi melons and dump- 
ing them in the bay for fear that the retail price might drop 
lower than twenty-five cents apiece. In San Francisco, water 
melons are a luxury because, the commission house pirates prefer 
to feed them to the fishes and report them as a loss to the con- 
signee. 

The buccaneer would rather throw away the consignee's prop- 
erty than let it be sold for less money than the ring of buccaneers 
considers should be paid for it. This ring has been formed for 
collective protection and co-operative piracy on the producer 
and the consumer, and it was at the behest of this ring and 
through the Harbor Commissioners that the Free Market of San 
Francisco was destroyed. That's another story, and will be told 
at another time. 



The Commissioners 

AND CaBTWEIGHT LAW 



The ring continues in spite of the 
threats of the Harbor Commissioners 
and despite the provisions of the 
Cartwright law. There are other 
laws as well that the "ring" does not fear because of the admir- 
able machinery of unification which works smoothly with the 
allied plunderers against the public on whom they prey, and the 
public is composed of the producer, the plundered, the 'consumer, 
and the plucked. 



The Buccaneers. 



They have adopted rules to limit 
their own activities, and the mem- 
bers of the plunder-bund never cut 
into the jugular in their competition, so-called. Prices are prac- 
tically always maintained by a system of wireless telegraphy, and 
the bland salesman down the line chants no deviation in the price 
of strawberries. It is the same one place as another, in Oakland 
as in San Francisco, only in Oakland it is a little more barefaced 
because Oakland has no ancestry to its commission business, and 
no sort of dignity to its methods anywav. They are just plain 
thieves over there, that's all. 

The only times that there are variations in prices set is when 
the market is choked by consignments, and when the commission 
men are in fear of the buyers going out to the country to pur- 
chase for themselves. To prevent anything of this kind the 
buccaneers have adopted the "Outlaw Provision." 



The Outlaw. 



The Outlaw is a retail dealer who 
dares to say his soul's his own, and 
- who purchases or who solicits con- 
signments on his own account, and when he starts out he finds 
usually that the stock of fruit or of any produce is all bespoken 
in advance, and that he cannot purchase a thing. The telephone 
has been at work, and the telegraph wires have been humming 
Ine reason for holding up prices is to profit from the canners 
and contracts with institutions as well as to make things half 
way satisfactory to the farmer, so that he will not invade the 
local held. It is easier to steal from a consignment of neaches 
ranging up to a dollar the box than from 'peaches quoted at 



twenty-five cents ! Peaches used to be twenty-five cents a basket 
in San Francisco •some years ago, and the ring was not then in 
existence, and the farmer made more money than he does now. 

High prices, artificially maintained by limiting the supply and 
by destroying the shipment or letting the fruit rot on the trees, 
by throwing water melons in the bay, by withdrawing vast quan- 
tities of oranges from the market and by other devious and 
crooked means, will never profit the producer. When the crop 
is over-abundant, he only sells a fraction of it at the buccaneer's 
"figures," and the rest is dumped into the bay by these worthies 
or kept on the ranch for decay or help feed the pigs. 

Instances may be cited where hundreds of tons of peaches 
and pears were dumped from Jackson and Washington streets 
wharves to prevent a break in prices. This is little short of crimi- 
nal, and the civic authorities should step in to absolutely prohibit 
such practices by preventing this pollution of the waters of the 
bay, and the Harbor Commissioners should step in to prevent the 
use of wharves as avenues for the dumpage of fruit or produce. 
The man who destroys eatables that are in fit condition for- 
human consumption in any large citv in the land is a criminal, 
pure and simple, and should be behind the bars, but when he dc- 
liberatelv destroys, to the end that the consumer shall pay a 
double price, he has earned a punishment that may not be made 
too severe. 

The buccaneers in the commission business have driven many 
canners away from San Francisco, and in this way have injured 
the city. But the story of the commission houses and the canners 
will have to be told in another chapter. 



The movement from the city to the 
■From Cttt to Country, country began in the congested 

Eastern States, and the move is now 
international, for the suburbs of London are being depopulated 
by the people for the more healthful locations where there is 
elbow room and to spare. The telephone and telegraph, electric 
and gasoline transportation and the ease with which the produce 
and producer may be moved about, the city amusements that 
may be now obtained in the country, aTe all factors which con- 
duce to country life. It is in a line with a desire to make life 
more livable to the producer and bring about a return to the 
land in California that the News Letter has undertaken to re- 
move the only element that exists in California to make the life 
of the small farmer unbearable. Outside of the grafting by 
the commission man, the small farmer enjoys fair to good roads, 
and he has probably as low railroad rates as any in the whole 
country. Besides this, he enjoys a climate and a fertility of soil 
that is unequaled in any semi-tropical country. The free market, 
an institution which was fathered by officials of the Southern 
Pacific, who were far-seeing, bid fair to give the farmer the 
relief that is- sought, but, through trickery, it has proved a fail- 
ure, and on the ground that it was a "socialistic experiment," it 
has been abolished. The story will come later. 




CHAS.KEJLUS fir CO 

EXCLUSIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No Branch Stores. No Agents. 



% 



OF ALL THE CLOTHES SHOPS IN THIS MODERN METROPOr I« 
"THE HUB," CHAS. KEILUS & CO., IS THE "ONE" EXCLUSIVE 
SHOP THAT SELLS MEN'S CLOTHES ONLY. WE DON'T Sir 
HABERDASHERY, SHOES. HATS. TRUNKS, GRIPS. BLANKETS np 
BOYS' CLOTHING; NOT EVEN CLOTHES TO MEASURE WE'RF 'A 
GENUINE CLOTHES SHOP. 



THIS LABEL 
DON'T EXTRACT 
TEETH. 




zTfyub 

fUn»*<ira ^ooimissERs 
ancisiaa. 



We adhere to the adage, "Shoemaker, stick to your last " 
We've been sticking to men's clothes exclusively since "The 
Hub" has been in existence. We've elevated the standard 
of men's clothes by our faithful attention to this branch 
alone. Our large trade and enviable reputation prove that 
we have the right kind of a shop. We study the wants and 
tastes of good dressers. You get clothes here that are so dif- 
ferent. They are not to be had outside of this shop. 



Jewelers Building, Poft Street, near Kearny, San Francisco 



Jnv :;. 1909 



and California Advertiser 




■"** 



'6WNCREJL 






Credit to whom credit is due, and in this instance the de- 
serving one is Editor Ernest S. Simpson of the Call, who has 
made frequent boast that neither he nor the policy of the paper 
which he directs were hitched to any post. His kick at the 
sprawling tricksters who resorted to the marked envelope primary 
scheme shows that the boast had merit, though the editorial foot 
was applied to the breeching of those who crawl around the bot- 
tom hem of the Call's garments. . Both Editor Simpson and his 
paper are cited for the enlightenment of Heyburns and their ilk 
that American newspapers and American newspaper men are 
right at the helm, though their opinions and methods may differ, 
when public interests and confidences are threatened with viola- 
tion by political blacklegs. 

The journal of "humility" and of the most "subtle and 

spiritual of all mechanisms," by some craft known only to itself, 
secured a picture of George D. Collins with shaven poll and in 
prison garb, which it has the indecency and cruelty to publish. 
If the warden of San Quentin permitted the photograph of the 
unfortunate lawyer to go out, he should be given short shrift. 
Collins is paying the penalty for his crimes, and for the Examiner 
to add to his torment and shame by picturing him in his dis- 
grace for the edification of tiie ghoulish entitles it not to "sit by 
the palace gate," but to a reserved space in the swill barrel. If 
justice was even- handed, there are some others deserving of the 
plight in which Collins finds himself. 

Backed by a letter of peculiar significance, K. Mattei, a 

resort keeper of Swanton, near Santa Cruz, accuses I\. 8. Miller, 
chairman of the Fish Hatchery Commission, of using his political 
pull to deprive him of a liquor license which he has held for five 
years without complaint, because he refused to renew the lease 
of the stream on his land to the Fisli autocrat. The symptoms 
incline to the truth of the charge, which Miller ought to refute 

or retire to the dark. It is suggested that the ■> I. 

sia is .more beneficent than the ruling by the specialist fanatic. 
Mr. Miller and his class require investigation by Governor 
Gillett, and if the Supervisors of Santa Cruz are toys of a pull 
they deserve removal and painting with tar warm from the brush. 

Marked cards have never been popular in the West, and 

the craven gambler who made use of such craft to siphon the 
shekels from the pockets of others was known simply as a 
leg." When a similar subterfuge is practiced in the game of 
politics to beguile the unwary in the furtherance of BO-called re- 
form, the method sets the stamp of the crook on the game. While 

the Town Crier has net entertained a very high opinion of the 
gang engaged in promoting reform, il is to be hoped for the sake 
el' their own reputations the] will End a scapegoat to relieve 
them of a part of the burden of shame resulting from being 
caught in a trick that is scurvy and mean and an affront to the 
community. 

The happy chorus of wedding hells which re-align the 

matrimonial columns of the Dunphys, the Silverstonea and cithers 
is significant of the fait that "true love never runs smoothly." 
The testimony submitted tends to disptaj that its con 
what snarled up in the form of a bowknot, and the tyii 

twisting of judicial decrees is merely a bait to bring \ 

the quicker into action with his darts galore. The happ 

all ami every one of the brides and grooms that resulted from 

tin' proceedings of divorce in Judge Graham's court is eat 

prayed for by the public at large, to the end that no on 

complexities will bear forth a myriad of more wedd 

From the critic's box in reviewing the passing show, IV I 

Blbertus has followed the way of the flesh and of all Hi 
formers and tumbled in with the throng. He has turned 

and pleads for loose dollars to make into more. lis b 
pilfering and plundering from the stores of great minds to 
them as the product of his own it ion as to the 

!1 be lured into the Hubba 



Professor Palmer of Harvard recommends that flirting 

and study should be mixed in equal parts by the members of his 
class. During one of his lectures he said: "It is surprising how- 
many young girls at Radcliffe College (where the learned pro- 
fessor also lectures) are letting the best part of their lives go by 
without the least enjoyment." Flirting he considers the. quintes- 
sence of enjoyment. And so it is, but not at Harvard ; not at 
Radcliffe. There is a sort of high-brow tradition in both these 
institutions which preserves them from being human in an open, 
frank, healthy manner. Puritanism put a ban on a smile ex- 
changed between the sexes, and Harvard and Radcliffe are essen- 
tially puritan in their initial impulse. Now, if Professor Pal- 
mer would only come to the bounding West, we would gladly 
show him what's what in the flirting line. Both Berkeley and 
Stanford are matrimonial bureaus run under the guise of edu- 
cational institutions. This is as it should be. So long as we re- 
tain our hearty contempt of everything that is priggish, so long 
as we can look with calm, dispassionate eyes on the affectation 
of technique, so long as we can laugh out in the open, and smile 
with a kindly light in our eyes on the female of our species, so 
long will we be free of the degrading sins practiced by the high 
brows in the factory towns of superior New England. 

An individual was arrested the other day in a Pennsyl- 
vania city and haled before the Police Judge on account of his 
ferocious appearance. He had committed no crime, and was en- 
gaged in strictly minding his own business. His physiognomy, 
however, frightened so many people that the police were com- 
pelled to lock him up, and the Judge found a way out of the 
dilemma by releasing him on condition that he leave the city. The 
man thus endowed by nature must be lacking in acumen. Why 
does he not become a cannibal savage from the jungles of Bor- 
neo, and compel people to pay for the privilege of being fright- 
ened by his appearance? I T iuler those conditions they would 
flock to see him : such is the perversity of human nature. 

Having hired the press that was open for engagement, re- 
tained the District Attorney's office ami recruited an army of 
Hessians in the guise of detectives to reform the commnnitj to 
fit specifications, the failure of those methods is confessed in the 
recourse to list. It is to he hoped thai Mi'. Francis J. Sullivan 

will quickly recover from the penalties inflicted for turning in- 
surgent, and that eventually his purity seeking brother-in-law 

will finally hit upon ways that are hardly bo drastic to make us all 

incline and submit in icceptance to in- pi: .form. 

The horrifying the twelve-year-old hoy, Frank 

Hopkins, at Modesto hist week. Dg attention through- 

out the world. Happ such perve 

monsters are ran'. Whether prenatal influence, ancestral re- 
version or the fact tint lie was severely bitten by a dog render 
him such an object of loathing, is not material. 




Large reductions on Summer 
Apparel in every Department. 
Garments which are specially 
adapted for vacation and out- 
ing wear. 

GRANT AVENUE AND GEARY ST. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 3, 1909 




The Salvation Army and the Associated Charities are at war 
over the custody of a girl. The army people assert that the 
manager of the Associated Charities is a woman devoid ol 
motherly instincts and an object of detestation by children. These 
two organizations exist solely for the benefit they are able to con- 
fer upon unfortunates. Both are supported by the public. One — 
the Salvation Army — begs and solicits with a boldness and 
rapacity that would not be tolerated in any other religious body, 
and grave rumors from time to time are heard anent the man- 
agement of the moneys thus obtained. The Associated Charities, 
on the other hand, is under the direct supervision of some of 
the wealthiest charitable ladies of San Francisco, and it seems 
unreasonable, although there are rumors of an unfavorable char- 
acter current, to suppose that they would tolerate as matron a 
person who is "an object of detestation by children.'' Individ- 
uals who, in these days, can boldly stand on the street corners 
and vociferate anent the literal ablutions they have received "in 
the blood of the Lamb," are either shameless fakers or mental in- 
competents, and as such are ill-fitted to take charge of even a 
street waif. The days of hallelujah religionists, who exist on 
the money they fairly drag out of the public pocket, arc num- 
bered in this country. 

A sample of an adherent of these organizations which live off 
street collections is to be found in the person of James J. Roche, 
whose wife is suing him for a divorce. Mrs. Roche alleges that 
her husband has in four years belonged to no less than three of 
these bodies. He first entered the ranks of the Salvation Army, 
thence transferred his allegiance to the Peniel Mission, when 
the Spirit moved him to join the Seventh Day Adventists so as 
to be enabled to refuse work on a Saturday. Lastly, he was ad- 
mitted to the Holy Rollers, and according to his wife, not only 
rolls around in spiritual convulsions, but also in contortions 
of alcoholic inspiration. It is not claimed that all members of 
these bodies are of this calibre, but the proportion of freaks and 
frauds is alarmingly large. Most of these people are ignorant 
neurasthenics, and flock to the meeting places to indulge in a 
species of debauchery on a mental plane, analogous to drunkeu- 
ness on the physical. With the exception of the Adventists, it 
it doubtful whether the good or harm done by these bodies is 
the greater. 

* * * 

An interior paper is indignant at 
the passing of an ordinance in the 
District of Columbia, by which the 
residents of Washington are forbid- 
den to keep roosters. Hens are not 
debarred, but the clarion calls of the 
rooster at the midnight hour and 
early dawn is no longer to be heard. 
Discussing the law, the Petaluma 
Journal remarks that the poodle- 
dogs "which 'sassiety' women kiss 
and fondle, are not reckoned with. 
These hydrophobia-breeding, no-ac- 
count dogs, which sleep wrapped up 
in robes on elegant couches, are to 
remain, but the useful fowls of the 
poor must go." 



While down in San Mateo County 
last week a friend dragged me to his 
barn, where he insisted on pointing 
out for my delectation a hen which, 
with unfaltering determination, has 
been sitting on a lone porcelain egg 
for the last twenty days. It occurred 



to me that the Spreckels crowd can be justly likened to that 
misguided chicken. For three years past they have brooded over 
the longing for personal amelioration. In the effort to achieve 
that end they have incubated schemes to remove or disgrace all 
who blocked their path. Last week those schemes were decided 
to be unworthy by a representative body of San Franciscans, and 
it is to be hoped that no attempt will be made in the near future 
to hatch another such doubtful reform egg. 

* * * 

Talk about hair-splitting and carping on technicalities by law- 
yers ! It has been left for a jury, in a murder case at Amster- 
dam, New York State, to achieve the pedestal of fame or notori- 
ety in this regard. This picked body of laymen, after due de- 
liberation, rendered a verdict as follows: "While in our minds 
and opinion we, as men, regard the defendant as guilty, vet, 
after considering our oaths as jurors and carefully considering 
the evidence as placed before us, we cannot find sufficient evi- 
dence to convict, and therefore render a verdict of not guilty." 
The despatches state that Justice Spencer was stupefied for a 
moment, but speedily recovered himself and severely scored the 
jurors, in addition to instructing the clerk to remove their names 
from the list of available jurors for future cases. It would be 
interesting to learn the feelings of the prosecuting attorney with 
respect to the phrase : "The evidence as placed before us." 

* * * 

Another potential republic, entitled to use the familiar initials 
U. S. A., is about to be ushered into the political world. The four 
South African States, which but a decade ago were engaged in 
a most deadly warfare, are to be consolidated. General Botha is 
due to arrive in London to secure the official consent of the 
imperial authorities to the union. Briton and Boer seem to have 
forgotten their difference, and the pessimistic outlook, immedi- 
ately following the military severities inflicted by Lord Kit- 
chener, has been dissipated. As a governing power, England 
stands unrivaled. Explain it as we may, the fact cannot be 
gainsaid that no governmental problem seems to be too hard for 
the trained and brilliant British administrators to solve. This 
latest achievement is perhaps worth the cost of the fratricidal 
contest of ten years ago. 

The distribution of old-age pensions in England has resulted 
in a remarkable consequence. There is a decided increase in the 
consumption of beer. This eternal liquor question crops up in 
the most unexpected manner. It is now in order for some pro- 
hibitionist crank to demand the abolition of the old age pension, 
and, as beer conduces to old age, old age as well. The authorities 
say, however, there is little increase in drunkenness, and if the 
sexagenarian pauper finds solace in an occasional glass of beer, 
his scanty pennies are not being squandered. 

President W. C. Brown, of the New York Central lines, in an 
interview last week, is quoted as saying that "bumper crops" 
are expected in the West, and that as a result an era of unprece- 



D J' 


^ 




., 


rearhne 

—especially adapted 

to washing 

Ducks 

Linens , 

Piques ^S^A 

Lawns j^*^ ^H 

Madras A* fW 


fc 4 

• J 

f 


V* 


■ 


SUMMER EXERCISE 

requires frequent washing of 
many gowns — Don't wear 
them out by destructive rub- 
bing with soap and wash- 
board. 

Rarhne 

does more than soap can do 

-WITHOUT RUBBING. 
That's why the most delicate 
wash fabrics last twice as long 




Percales i 
Cheviots ' 
Ginghams 
Organdies 
and all other 
Wash Fabrics. 


M 


■ 






fearline Does the Washing 



July 3, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



dented prosperity is not far ahead of the country. He ascribes 
to the tinkering with the tariff an evil effect on business, and 
asserts that the commercial men of the country are more inter- 
rs; id in having the question settled than they are in actual 
tariff measures. Such opinions., from such an authority, arc 
worth more than all the pessimistic predictions of worthless ne'er- 
1 1 n- wells and senile failures. The tariff question must shortly 
be settled, from sheer exhaustion of the tinkerers, if from no 
other cause ; the bumper crops will shortly be in, stacked in the 
luirvest field, and the era of prosperity will be upon us. 



The Baroness Von Hutton, lately divorced from her German 
husband, and known to readers of the magazines as an author 
of stories dealing with a non-existent "aristocracy," is distressed 
over the published accounts of alleged quarrels between her and 
her late husband. The baroness wishes it understood that she 
is on most friendly terms with the gentleman, even more so 
than when they were married. The American noblewoman may 
be assured. People in the United States take little interest in 
the marital developments of expatriated kindred who can discern 
no good in their native country. 



G1LLETT JOINS A NEW ORDER. 

Governor Gillett is a man of many orders and honors. He is 
a Shriner and wears a fez ; a Knight Templar and wears a plume ; 
a member of uniform rank of the Knights of Pythias, and wears 
a uniform; and a member in good standing of the Festive 
Knights of the Order of Scant Attire, but he doesn't wear the 
"gee string." The "grand cordon" was recently draped on his 
statuesque figure by Pu-long-long, an Igorrote, educated in Cali- 
fornia schools. This ceremony was held during the recent visit 
of the executive to the A. Y. P. Exposition, when the Filipino 
head-hunters showed their warm regard for him on one of his 
outings on the Pay Streak. 

The Igorrotes fought a sham battle for his entertainment, and 
went through their list of games. The solemn rites of initiation 
consisted of a soul-searching Igorrote song and the presentation 
of a complete Igorrote wardrobe. When his Excellency left the 
Pair grounds he had the insignia of the order tucked away in 
a deep coat-tail pocket. 



The Taft plan of taxing corporations and incomes is a 

joke. It considers net incomes only. These will disappear in 
expenses and betterments. 



Some one secured a $350 diamond 
in a Vallejo bakery a few days ago. 
The proprietress of the bakery, en- 
grossed in the rush of business, neg- 
lected to remove her diamond ring, 
in which the stone was loose. A few 
minutes later she discovered that 
the stone was missing, and a vigilant 
search established the theory that it 
must have rolled into a wrapper 
containing a loaf of bread. On re- 
flection, it does seem to be rather in- 
appropriate, for a lady engaged in 
selling five cent loaves of bread, to 
wear jewelry and precious stones, 
whose value usually restricts their 
possession to bloated plutocrats and 
their better halves. It is to be hoped 
that it will not be a ease of throwing 
pearls before swine in case it is 
found, and also that the liberal re- 
ward offered will result in its re- 
turn to the lady, who will doubtless 
forswear in future the wearing of 
expensive jewelry on such occasions. 

* * * 

The poll tax man is abroad in the 
city, determined to double last rear's 
receipts. No one is exempt save 
paupers, lunatics and Indian- <• 
aboriginal descent. Dodging l to 
to judge by his public utteranci 
going to be a Btrenuous occupation 

I Ins year. 

* * * 

111 a recently published book on 
etiquette, the information is vouch- 
safed that it is highly reprehensible 

to suck one'- fingers at table, if per- 
. h ince thej • "me in contacl with 
dainty. Thus, by the aid of 
guch beacon lights, mankind treads 
slowly and I'alteringly in the straight 

and narrow path of eetheticism. 

* * * 

A despatch from Stockton states 
that the farmers and orehardists are 
worrying because of a short... 

labor. Higher wages are beil 
fered than ' years past. In 

four weeks the grape harvest will bo- 
gin, and the labor to gather it is not 
in evidence at present This should 
he interesting news to the League of 
the Unemployed, if that bod 

an incorporated entity. 



e~5ixth Senses 



the Power o 





An American's sense ot projecting himself 
far beyond the skies and hills oi his forefathers is 
largely responsible for his self-assurance— for his 
mental vigor and the progress which this has 
meant. 

This Sixth Sense— the sense of projection- 
is due to the telephone. It is due to the Belt 
telephone system which at any instant conveys 
his personality, if not his person, to any part of 
the country. It carries his voice with directness 
to the ear of the person wanted. Carries it with 
its tone qualities and inflections— things which 
are vital to the expression of personality. 

Bell telephone service is more than a mere 
carrier of messages. It is a system of sensitive 
wire nerves, carrying the perception-message to 
the nerve centre and the return message simulta- 
neously. It is the only means of communication 
which thus carries the message and the answer 
instantly. While you are projecting your per- 



sonality— the strength of your individuality, to the 
distant point, the party at the other end is pro- 
jecting his personality, at the same instant and by 
the same means, to you. 

You are virtually in two places at once. 

Though this service is in a class by itself, the 
Bell telephone has no fight with the other public 
utilities. Its usefulness is dove-tailed into all 
other utilities. Each of the others is unquestion- 
ably made more effective by the Bell telephone. 

A telegram is delivered from receiving office to 
house by telephone. The more people telegraph, 
the more they telephone. The more people travel, 
the more they telephone. The more energetically 
a man pursues business of any kind, the more he 
needs and uses the telephone. 

The universal Bell telephone gives every 
other utility an added usefulness. It provides 
the Nation with its Sixth Sense. 



A business man has one important arm of his business 
paralyzed if he does not have a Long Distance Tele- 
phone at his elbow. It extends his personality to its 
fullest limitations — applies the multiplication table to 
his business possibilities. It keeps things moving. 

The American Telephone and Telegraph Company 
And Associated Companies 

Every Bell Telephone Is a Long Distance Station 



San Franciseo News Letter 



July 3, 1909 



Sty? Minister of Jfamgn Affair* 



The war cloud which hung oyer 
The Cretan War Cloud. Crete a week ago, and toward which 

similar clouds were rushing, has 
been dissipated, but to return again at a more convenient time. 
The "Cretan affair" will be remembered as a product of war be- 
tween Turkey and Greece in 1897 — only a dozen years ago the 
outcome of which was a sound thrashing for the land of the 
old philosophers and the birthplace of classic mythology. As a 
spoil of war, Turkey claimed and secured the island of Crete, 
or Candia, as it was called in ancient times. But fearing direcf 
rule by Turkey might create fresh trouble, the powers obliged 
the Porte to vest the executive authority in the island in a High 
Commissioner of the Greek Church faith. That was because 
of the total population, about 300,000, less than one-third, were 
Mohammedans, the remaining population of the Greek orthodox 
faith, and there was a strong disposition on the part of the 
majority to refuse to accept the transfer of their country to Turk- 
ish ownership, and to prevent an outbreak that would have in- 
volved all Europe, it was agreed that certain of the Christian 
powers should maintain a certain number of their troops on the 
island to prevent just such a happening, which satisfied the 
native Greeks. The difficulty that has just been settled grew 
out of the fact that the time of the residence of these foreign 
troops on the island was soon to expire by limitation, when 
they were to be retired to their own land. In anticipation of this 
the Greek inhabitants, numbering over 200,000. began to bold 
public meetings for the purpose of organizing public sentiment 
into a consolidated force to demand re-annexation of Crete to 
Greece the moment the last foreign soldier quitted the island. 
The Sultan, being aware of this, and knowing that a funda- 
mental of the new Turkey policy was that not an inch of terri- 
tory should be parted with, he consulted with the nations in 
interest, and they agreed to extend the time of the stay of their 
troops on the island. This satisfied the resident Greeks, and 
they gave up their plans to declare the island's independence of 
Turkey and then rejoin the Grecian kingdom. Had not this or 
some such arrangement been made and the Greeks of the island 
started a revolution, all Europe would have been ablaze in a 
day, for every Turk in Europe and Asia Minor would have 
rushed to the defense of the Sultan's policy, which was that un- 
der no circumstance would a foot of Turkish territory be parted 
with. In turn, Russia would have espoused the cause of the 
Cretans of the Greek orthodox church, and in this the Czar 
would have had the backing of Germany ami Austria, ami thus 
the desired excuse for forcing the Dardanelles by Uussia ami 
for marching away in the direction of Salonika by the Germanic 
combine would have come as lightning sometimes comes out of a 
clear sky. The new Sultan and the Young Turk party are given 
credit for this bit of splendid diplomatic strategy, and defeating 
the Berlin, Vienna and St. Petersburg scheme to gain the 
balance of power in the Near East. 



That Imperial Navy. 



Admiral Lord Beresford has en- 
larged upon his plan of a fortnight 
ago for a more, serviceable British 
navy. He would call it "the Imperial navy," and to that end 
he would divide the earthly possessions of Great Britain into 
five separate and yet not separate nations, namely: England, 
Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the recently formed South 
Africa Federation. He would have each of these five nations 
a separate unit of war power in itself, the whole forming the 
united strength of the British empire. Of course, his plans are 
for war in the first instance, and incidentally for commercial 
expansion. If the Government gives its approval of his plans 
for an Imperial Navy, each of the five nations will go forward 
under its own direction, presumably at its own expense, and 
create as large and as efficient a fleet as it would need if stand- 
ing aloof from and apart from every other nation in the world 

an independent nation relying upon its own resources to pro- 
tect its interests at home and abroad. But Beresford"s plan does 
not, of course, provide for any other kind of separatencss. The 
King-Emperor and his cabinet would still be the supreme head 
of the several nations, and laws enacted by the several national 
Parliaments would always be in harmony with the policy of the 



supreme head, but in all local affairs the nation would be 
supreme. The King-Emperor, the Secretary for the Colonies, 
the Admiralty, and the Field-Marshal-in-Chief of the army, 
would constitute in reality the one central authority, and neces- 
sarily they would reside in London. It is very clear that Beres- 
ford's idea is to make the central head of the Government de- 
cidedly imperialistic, and at the same time transform the colonies 
into a federation of nations, each possessing even a greater scope 
of individual or national independence than is now enjoyed; it 
means, in fact, so far as the author of the plan is concerned, a 
vastly greater British empire and the re-fortifying the position 
of Great Britain as the dominating political power and influence 
in the family of nations. 

The Pan-German Union is not idle 
Of General Interest. these days. On the contrary, it seems 

to have more life and energy than 
ever, only that now the logic of its purpose is to fix the fact 
clearly in the minds of the Germanic peoples of Europe that 
only Russia and England stand in the way of German progress 
in the currents of commerce and territorial expansion. Also, 
that it should be the policy of Germany to discourage immigra- 
tion of her subjects to countries where the immigrants would ulti- 
mately be forever lost to the Fatherland. This means that the 
nation should have colonies of her own where the newcomers 
would still be subjects of the empire. — King Edward's health is 
again causing anxiety, but he does not seem willing to have the 
Prince of Wales share the burdens of State with him, believing 
that he is still physically equal to all the demands upon him. — 
The Slav influence in' the Balkan States, and there are thou- 
sands of Slavs there, seems to he restless, and it is believed they 
are being influenced against the existing order of things by 
Austrian agents. 



PARIS, AS A FRENCHMAN SEES IT. 

"As it stands, it is not too much to say that 'Walks in Paris' 
is indispensable to all who visit that city hereafter," declares a 
critic in the Boston Herald of Georges Cain's new work. A 
higher compliment it would be hard to pay, for the critic hap- 
pens to be a true lover of Paris and not disposed ordinarily to 
accept the opinions and impressions of others in place of his 
own. Yet for Mr. Cain as a guide he has only praise. 

"Who would not gladly see Paris in the company of Mr. 
Georges Cain," he asks, "a guide so sensible of all the aromas 
that mingle their appeal in that subtle thing, the charm of 
Paris ?" 

Another reviewer concludes with the same thought, "He is so 
full of his subject, so completely master of every detail that 
you become as enthusiastic as himself,'' declares the "Sports of 
the Times." "Ah ! if we had such a guide as Mr. Cain to ac- 
company our walks in New York." 



FINE BORDEAUX 



Clarets & Sauternes 



SCHRODER & SCHYLER & CO. 



THE OLDEST SHIPPING HOUSE 
IN BORDEAUX. FRANCE 



Charles Meinecke & Co. 



Agents Pacific Coast 



San Francisco 



• Ii LI 3, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



SmprPBatons of Stoni WorloH 



1 was in the quarters of the so-called Unemployed League a 
few days ago. Probably lil'tv men, young, middle-aged and old, 
were seated on the benches. In n store room were piled up a 
large number of bundles of blankets, etc., doubtless the property 
of country hoboes enjoying a sojourn in this city free of expense. 
Behind a rough desk a gray-bearded man, with the expression 
of one who admits defeat in the game of life and refuses to fight 
any longer, was seated, desultorily reading a newspaper. 

1 approached, and after buying a copy of the "Voice of the 
Unemployed," asked him how long he thought the problem of the 
workless in the midst of work would be inflicted upon an un- 
appreciative world. 

"Forever, I guess, - ' he replied with a weary gesture. At this 
juncture a party stepped in and inquired if he could secure a, 
man to wash some windows. Not a response was elicited, and 
he went out. I then bethought me of the offer, which I had 
personally verified, of a large corporation to employ some hun- 
dreds of these men all summer at good wages. I also bethought 
me of the indifference with which the offer was received by these 
so-called starving unfortunates, and I walked out of the gloomy 
place, with its horde of listless, hopeless and unkempt guests. 

As I felt, the warm ravs of the bright spring sun, and looked 
into the faces of the legitimate toilers on the streets, I felt that 
I was indeed in another world, a world in which each man can 
stand erect and unashamed, in the knowledge that be asks no 
assistance or odds of his brother toiler. The dingy horroi on 
Leavenworth street, with its inmates living on supplies obtained 
Free from restaurants and groceries, I am attempting to forget. 

The Caliph. 



THE BLARNEY STONE. 

Among the old castles of Ireland, none is more famous than 
Blarney, in County Cork. It is in the walls of this building 
that the Blarney stone is set, a stone that has given to English 
speech a name for what is otherwise sometimes known as "tall v." 
The castle itself dates from the year 1 I 16. It stands in a region 
which abounds in legend, tradition and old-time belief in fairies. 

Blarney Castle obtained its fame from a stone, >iill in the 
walls, around which clusters much of romance ami superstition. 
Tradition says that after Cormac MacCarthy had built this castle 

be chanced one day to save an old woman from drowning, who. 

io show her gratitude, offered Cormac a golden tongue which 
should have ibo power of fluenl persuasiveness a tongue thai 
could influence men and women, friends and foes, as be willed. 
To gel this power, however, Cormac must climb to ' 
the castle, lei himself down in some difficult «av. and kiss : 

lain si in the walls situated aboul five feet below the - 

running round the top. It is -eiid that be followed t 
woman's directions with great minuteness, kissed the stone, and 
ai once obtained all the persuasive eloquence which bad been 
promised him. 

Soon (be story u is [old throughout Ireland. It went .. 

other countries, and made Blarney one of the best-known 
in the world. 

Walking round : ; be castle walls in the warm sunshine 

I began to look for the noted stone, and at last found ii b 

place by two iron bands suspended from the very lop of i!i 
battlements. A row of iron spike; has been placed on the top 

of the battlements above the stone to prevent foolhardy adven- 

iroui attempting to kiss the si. ug let do\\ 

the walls by the heels, as was the custom at one time. 

\ow the pilgrim to this shrine of eloquence must 

on bis knees, or lie tla! down on the stones, bend his 

waist, and thrust his head and shoulders down about thn 

through a Bquare opening in the stones opposite the i 

in this position turn his neck and kiss the stone from the under 

side. An attendant with good muscles must be at hand ! 

>U of the one who attorn by the 

law of gravitation he will topple over anil go through ti 
to the ground, a hundred and twenty feet below. 



WBDDINQ PRESENTS. 

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10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 3, 1909 



OUR PRESS-AGENTED HEROES. 

In these days when the press agent has extended his successful 
activities froni the theatre to nearly every other walk in life, it is 
not surprising that his labors have been found profitable to the 
members of the military profession. Striking examples have 
been revealed in the cases of General Nelson A. Miles, who 
never has failed to furnish good "copy"' to the newspapers; 
General Frederick A. Funston," whose luck was such that his ex- 
ploits always fell under the glare of the press; of General J. J. 
Pershing, who merelv completed the work done in Mindanao 
quietly by General Bell ; of Admiral Winfield Scott Schley, who 
alwaj's glad-handed the reporters and simply obeyed the orders 
of Admiral Sampson at Santiago, after long hesitation and at 
least two flagrant exhibitions of '"cold feet;'" of Admiral Kobley 
D. Evans, who earned his sobriquet of "Fighting Bob" by par- 
ticipating in just two fights and by keeping diligently in the lime 
light. Hobson is another of the press-agented heroes. 

These are but a few. But who ever hears of the real, modest, 
quiet heroes, such as Victor Bine, brother of our Dr. Uupert 
Blue? Or of Lucien Young, who has performed more deeds of 
gallantry than any officer on the navy's active list? Or of that 
obscure, forgotten Lieutenant who discovered Aguinaldo"s where- 
abouts and planned the capture subsequently effected by Fun- 
ston? Or of the brave little Midshipman Wood, who lost his 
life in the Urdaneta in Luzon ? Or of dozens of others, in both 
Cuba and the Philippines, who were truly heroic but performed 
their deeds in the absence of the correspondent ? 

The interview and the lecture platform have produced more 
American popular "heroes" than the battlefield or the turret. It 
is true that Funston has always made good; the others have 
made good occasionally. But they are no more gallant or effi- 
cient, often not nearly so, as the genuine heroes whose exploits 
are recorded only in the musty pigeon-holes of the War and Navy 
Departments. 

Granting that all are brave and faithful, it is the press-agent 
that earns for them the promotions. 



ROBBING BY LAW. 



■ Gratifying indignation has been displayed by even the high- 
tariff press at a tricky and thieving Sugar Trust. Cheating the 
Treasury by false weights, and so, in effect, filching money from 
every citizen, has been virtuously denounced. But while this 
robbery against the law has provoked wrath and scorn, open 
preparations to rob by means of the law stir these protectionist 
censors to no anger. Yet what is the real difference? How much 
worse is the moral standing of the man who steals from the 
public by lying scales, than that of the man who gets his hands 
in the pockets of his fellows by virtue of the tariff? For our 
part, we prefer the avowed burglary to sneak-thievery masquer- 
ading as patriotism. If a powerful corporation, by dint of politi- 
cal bribery and secret influence, is allowed a "differential," or 
some other form of special favor, by statute, enabling it to mulct 
consumers to the tune of $40,000,000 or $50,000,000 a year, 
we have rather less respect for it. and for the process by which 
it enriches itself, than for the acknowledged pickpocket or "sec- 
ond-storey" man. 

Names cannot cover up facts or alter morals. If it is disrepu- 
table to hire a weigher to falsify records, it is just as disreputable 
to "see Aldrich" and get your tariff duties "fixed" so that you 
can lawfully collect tribute from all your countrymen. The lat- 
ter method is being pursued at Washington amid general ap- 
plause; but when an unlucky Trust is caught doing practically 
the same thing lawlessly, we all rise up in horror. But cheai inl- 
and oppression are what they are even if legalized. The moral 
quality of a transaction is not changed by the fact that the un- 
fair appropriation of another man's property may be authorized 
by act of Congress, and may be called our glorious American 
system of protection. — New York Eveninr/ Post. 



Promptness is a characteristic of the Spalding Carpet 

Cleaning Company. Thoroughness is another, and the housewife 
who entrusts her rugs or carpets to this firm is a walking adver- 
tisement of its efficiency. Every quality that goes to ensure an 
ever-increasing patronage is the practice of this reliable house. 

The Jvly Overland Monthly contains an exhaustive arti- 

cle describing tin charms of the Hawaiian Islands. At all 
newsstands. 



Nothing under the Son 
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It's use by owners of valuable Plate for more 

than 40 years is evidence of its superior merit. 

Send address for FREE SAMPLE, 

or 15 eta. in stamps for fall sized box, post-paid. 

The Electro Silicon Co., 30 Cliff St., New York. 

Sold by Grocers and Druggists. 




New 

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and 

Hotel 



N. W. Corner 
Polk & Post StS. 
San Francisco 

Phone 

Franklin 2960 



For Oysters 
Moraghan's Restaurant 

26 Ellis Street 

Music during dinner. Open Sundays. 





The Leading Restaurant 
of San Francisco 

REGULAR DINNER $1.25 
or A la Carte 

342 Sutter Street San Francisco 



Jules' Restaurant 



328 Bush Street 

Below Kearny Street 
PHONE KEARNY 1812 
Music every evening by Fred Epstein Orchestra 

Dinners, Sundays and Holidays 
DINNERS, With wine 75c With wine, SI. 00 

MAISON DOREE HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

151-157 ELLIS STREET. ABOVE POWELL. Up-to-dale Establishment 
Lunch with wine 75c. Dinner with wine $1.25. Music every evening. 

Phone Ex. Douglas 1040 connecting all apartments 
Emile Ponteiller. formerly with the Pup; Victor Laborie: John Dubourdieu. formerly with (he 
Poodle Dog. 



Murphy Grant & Company 

Wholesale Dry Goods 

N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 

New Goods constantly arriving 1 and on sale. 



Jily 3, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



11 




piMME'aii) 




IVe atyMou&J 4f&»w-i/!W 



By Barnett Franklin. 

The Matured Florence Roberts at the Alcazar. 

The Florence Roberts season at the Alcazar has had an excel- 
lent start and is running merrily on. Florence of the lachrymose 
tendencies is a great favorite in the West, and always plays to 
good houses with, of course, a heavy sprinkling of maidens of 
tender years ever among those present. In days agone Miss 
Roberts was San Francisco's favorite matinee heroine, and she 
has lost little of her prestige with the seminary gels. Muriel 
and Vivian and Gladys have not deserted her. They still secure 
their seats up front, on the aisle, every week-end. The caramel 
brigade still swears by its idol. 

There was a time when many of us believed that Miss Roberts 
and her acting methods were for the chocolate-creamy folk alone. 
She was a very tricky, very stagev actress. She was, in addition, 
the star weeper behind the footlights. She was ever unhappy in 
stageland. She was a very tearful figure. Her fair feminine 
admirers didn't dare wander theatrewards without being equipped 
with at least a dozen extra hankies. The ladies, bless 'em, started 
on their weeping expedition with malice aforethought, and they 
were never disappointed. The errotic Florence always gratified. 
They could spill tears to their hearts' content. 

But the Florence Roberts that is with us now is a very super- 
ior histrion. She has put away many of her trickeries. She 
seems to have other ambitions than to make milady morose. She 
is, in truth, a better, bigger — I'm not referring to her physically 
now — artist. True, the roles that she has enacted thus far at the 
Alcazar were far from being weepy ones — and there are Sapphos 
to come — but her development is definitely pronounced. 

Miss Roberts is far from being a great actress, but she is a 





The three Sisters Athletas, who tvill begin an engagement at 
the Orpheum this Sunday matinee. 

most satisfactory one. Her Du Barry, which she gave for her 
opening two weeks, was an exceedingly good characterization. 
She was a very human character in a very artificial play. In 
the olden days she would have been merely "dopy" in the part 
where she is now quite natural. Of course, there is always the 
note of theatricism to be discerned in her work, but then she 
is playing plays that are soaked in theatricism. 

"A Country Girl," which she is playing this week, makes for 
further disclosures of her development. It is a very crude, fool- 
ish old affair, is "A Country Girl," tilled with obvious and bat- 
tered old situations and lines, and abounding with antediluvian 
Ordinarily presented, the play is to laugh. 
"A Country Girl" i> merely a en days of natural- 

ness and unartifieiality in the drama. Yet Miss Roberts makes a 
sitting through it worth while purely for her own self. The humor- 
"iij tow h ito the action lirings the right kind 

of a smile i" vimr countenance. She may not be dainty in her 
comedy, hut she is at anv rate unctuously entertaining. And it 
particularly <;rik.s yon that she i B9 of considerable ver- 

satility, for in a role as different as possible from the one of the 
previous week she scores equally. As Peggy Thrift, the 
phisticated country maid who i innon town and dons 

B, she is the sole reason for a reviving of this old 



rral in "Tie ilerru 
tt Theatre. 




New York ^Si^SS/Ss 

/A'C o O0OQM TtD 

New Store 139. 141, MJGeiry Street, between Grtnt Ave. and Stockton 



Greatest Values in Suits. Costumes, ever offered in San 
Francisco. Stunning Suits $19.50. some worth as high as 
$45.00. Line of Tailored Suits and Dresses $12.50. values 
up to $25.00. Lingerie Dresses $25.00. values up to $40. 
Silk Petticoats $5.00. values up to $8.50. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 3, 190!) 




Beryl Hope, as "The Lady" in "Three Weeks" at the Ameri- 
can Theatre, commencing this Sunday matinee. 

play, which long ago outdid its service. Hers is a conspicuous 
success. 

The Alcazar's producl ion is, as usual, a very thorough one, and 
the players generally are all in the picture. Thurlow Bergen, 
Miss Eoberts' leading man, is a capable actor, and it is notable 
that he can wear laces and frills and silken hose in a very 
human manner. Which is no light task, I can tell you. 

— B. F. 

* * * 
Laddie Cliff at the Orpheum. is a Bare Youngster. 

■Many of us shy visibly at the mention of an "English music- 
hall" artist on a programme. Experience, hard experience, has 
caused the shying, for while many of the English vaudevillians 
have been very, very good, many — oh, many — have been exceed- 
ingly horrid. Master Laddie Cliff, a youngster in his 'teens, who 
is making his debut at the Orpheum this week, is one of the good 
ones. In fact, Master Cliff is head and shoulders the best offer- 
ing on the bill with fifteen minutes of foolishness, patter-singing, 
and ingenious dancing. Master Cliff doesn't reel off jokes culled 
from "Punch" either. His humor is understandable in San 
Francisco, California, U. S. A. And he is funny without being 
coarse. His song about the "tack" is well handled and well-acted, 
and properly scores heavily. Don't overlook Master Cliff during 
his sojourn here. 

Ollie Young and his three alleged brothers have a particularly 
entertaining act. The Youngs toy with hoops and boomerangs 
and play at diablo with a skill that is quite marvelous. It is 
really quite a delightful act to watch, and the inanimate pieces of 
wood and metal are made to go through the most startling ac- 
tions. 



The "Eight Original Madcaps" are very much of a disap- 
pointment, coming here as they did with a herald working over- 
time. The madcaps wear nice blue costumes, and we know they 
are madcaps because they arc constantly screeching and shouting. 
Otherwise, we would not be enlightened, I'm afraid, for their 
act is as unmadcappy as it were possible to imagine. And they 
can't pirouette for sour apples. They toil a great deal but they 
do not spin. 

The "Singing Colleens" wear green dresses and sing some 
Irish ballads and some popular American ones. They take them- 
selves very seriously, and some of the audience seem to like their 
warbling, but 1 prefer the horse race in "The Futurity Winner." 

James Thornton still monologues; Clark and Bergman fill in, 
and the Camille Trio is as funny as ever on the horizontal liars. 

* '* * 

The Grand Opera, Season at the Princess. 

The grand opera season at the Princess is in its third week. 
and it. is running along most successfully with each succeeding 
performance. For the popular prices that are being charged, San 
Francisco music-lovers are certainly getting excellent value for 
their collateral, and the increasing size of the audiences is evi- 
dence that our local opera followers are "catching mi" to the 
worth of the singers in their midst. 

"Eigoletto," given this week, was another of the big successes 
of the season. Our old friend Arcangeli sang the title role in 
fine robust fashion, and was an altogether forceful and virile 
Rigoletto. Bari. the tenor, was wholly admirable as the Duke, 
and appeared to probably better "advantage than in any other 
role thus far. His is a ringing, colorful voice, with a fine, 
agreeable quality. 

Norelli was not altogether satisfactory, for there is a harsh note 
in her voice thai is <il'ten disconcerting. Her trills, though, are 
rare and wonderful things. Mme. Strauss, as Maddelena, was 
to me much more completely pleasing, and her singing was a 
big asset toward the success of the performance. 

The ability of the conductor, Merola. becomes more pronounci 'I 
with every performance. His is musicianship of a high order, 

and his vitality is to mai'vel at. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNi 'EMENTS. 

The biggest advance inquiry for seats in the history of local 
theatricals has resulted in the engagement of "The Merry 
Widow," which is to open at the Van Ness Theatre on Sunday 
night, July 4th. For weeks past a great many hundreds of 
mail, telephone and telegraph orders have been coming into the 
box office of the theatre, and when the sale opened on Thursday, 
the rush for seats was something unprecedented. From present 
indications, the engagement will go down in theatrical records 
as the most stupendous money-getter ever known here, and Henry 
W. Savage will be amply paid for the liberality shown by him in 
sending so magnificent a production all the way across the con- 
tinent. San Franciscans have been anxiously awaiting the ap- 
pearance of the celebrated work by Franz Lehar, and with such 
splendid principals at. the head of the company as Mabel Wilber, 
George Dameral, Oscar Figman, Georgena Leary and Thomas 
Leary, a positively perfect performance should result. While 
everything connected with "The Merry Widow" is more or less 
fascinating, the supposition is that the dance dominates all, so 
much so that the entire audience naturally wants to dance. The 
entire score, however, is enchanting, and variety is its potent 
charm. The "Madam Butterfly" grand opera orchestra will be 
brought here with the production. The first matinee will he 
given Monday. 

Marie Doro in "The Morals of Marcus" closes Saturday night. 
* * * 

The success of the International Grand Opera Company at the 
Princess Theatre has covered with confusion the wiseacres who 
declared most positively that a grand opera season in mid-sum- 
mer must result in absolute failure as far as patronage was con- 
cerned. For the past three weeks the attendance at the Princess 
Theatre has been very large at every performance, and in several 




INGCO. 



Bathing Suits 
Underwear 
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Second floor San Francisco 



July 3, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



13 



instances standing room was unobtainable. The organization is 
certainly a very complete one, and in every way worthy of the 
immense success which has attended it. The repertoire for next 
week is very attractive, and will doubtless result in the continu- 
ance of popularity. Monday evening "Traviata" will be repeated 
by popular request, and on Tuesday evening Maseagni's 
'Tj'Amico Fritz" will be presented, not only for the first time in 
this city, but also for the first time in this country. Wednesday 
matinee "Fedora" will be sung, and on Wednesday evening 
"Faust" will be the programme. Thursday evening will witness 
another important musical event, the production of Verdi's mas- 
terpiece, "Otello," with Louis Samoiloff in the title role. Al- 
though an American born, Mr. Samoiloff has spent a consider- 
able portion of his life abroad, especially in Italy, where he has 
won great fame. "Otello" will be repeated on Sunday evening, 
and on Friday evening the always popular double bill, "Caval- 
leria Rusticana" and "I'Pagiiacci," will be presented. At the 
Saturday matinee, "The Barber of Seville" will be given for the 
first time in several years. 

When Elinor Glyn addressed herself to the task of construct- 
ing a. play out of her much-discussed novel, "Three Weeks," pre- 
dictions of failure were many from those who had read the book 
and who declared the subject unfit for stage presentation. Elinor 
Glyn pci-scvered, however, and a few months ago gave a copy- 
right performance of her play in England, she herself appearing 
in the cast. In some respects this first draft of the play verified 
the fears of its prenatal critics. Since, then, however, the entire 
work has been revised and changed, and S^jn Francisco theatre- 
goers will have an opportunity to pass judgment upon (he play, 
which conies to the American Theatre for the week beginning 
Sunday matinee, July -1th, and including the usual matinee per- 
formances. The play will he given with a selected cast, headed 
bv Miss Beryl Hope, an emotional actress of power and popu- 
larity, and with Harry C. Browne, as Paid. An elaborate scenic 
mounting is promised. 

"The Blue Mouse" will be given for tin- last times Saturday 
matinee and night. 

* * * 

The Orpheum programme Eoi aexl week will have as I be head- 
line a I traction "Kedpath's Napfinees," in which George Hillman 
is featured with four clever girls and the same number of boys. 
It is said to he the most charming school act in vaudeville to- 
day, and it depicts an old fashioned school house with b Q 
teacher, played by Mr. Hillman. who is continually plagued and 
tormented by a most mischievous ael of pupils, The -kit is an- 
nounced as full of fun and containing quite a number of catchy 
songs and dances. The three Sisters Athleias. who will make 
their first appearance here, are famous throughout Europe as 
acrobats. Tn this country they have been received with enthu- 
siasm, and their appearance in Nct Xorl result I in quite a 
sensation, Harry Armstrong ami Billy Clarke, two of Am 
best know n soul' writers will con! ribute to the coming hill a little 
one-act divertissement called "Finding a Partner," which intro- 
duces many of their newest song hits. Herr Londe and Pranlein 

Tilly will present one of the m08t unique athletic novelti, 

imported from Europe for the Orpheum circuit 

will he the last of "Eight Madcaps." Mas Wi i S 
Icons. Ollie Young and Brothers, ami of Laddie Cliff, England's 
famous boy comedian and grotesque dancer. As usual, a series 
of novel motion pictures will I lose the show. 

* * * 

Commencing with a matinee Monday, July 5th, th 
attraction during the week will he "Sapho," with Florence 1!"' 
aria in the title part. Ever simc the present engages 
Miss Roberts was first announced, there has been urgent popular 
request that she he presented in "Sapho." Alp 1 ;-!.- D 
main purpose in writing "Sapho" was to convey to h - 
a practical warning to beware of wantons' wiles. To make the 

i impress the immature mind at which it was 
the great French dramatist painted it in ilors, but in 

the play there is nothing that could really offend modern moral 
'rst produced many American plays 
which i re unequivocally unconventional - ionship 

have been approved by all ultra-prudish. 

Thurlow Bergen will play Jean, and the remainder of t ; 
is tilled by the favorites of the rosru UC Company, with 

many extra people as silent auxiliaries. In the staging there 
has been n in the extreme is the 



setting of the first act, showing a Parisian bal masque in pro- 
gross, with scores of gaily-garbed revelers constantly cro ing 
and re-crossing, and laughing and chatting. 

"The Country Girl" and the curtain-raiser, "Journey's End in 
Lover's Meeting," will be given for the Last lime this Sunday 
evening. 

Arthur Cunningham will make his lasl appearance in "Arrali 
Na Pogue" at the Valencia Theatre this Sunday afternoon and 
evening, and on Monday night "What Happened to Jones." 
George H. Broadhurst's best effort, will he given a capita] pro- 
duction. Mr. Broadhurst is one of the very best constructors of 
fast-moving, laughter-making farces. His sense of humor is as 
sharp as his situations are vivid, and his dialogue races along 
with a crispness that is a joy. 

Paul McAllister, who made such a hit as the "Man from 
Mexico," will be Gingery Jones: George Osbourne the Bishop; 
(diaries Dow Clark the Professor of Anatomy; Robert Homans 
the insane gentleman; Grace Travers will also appear, and Lil- 
lian Andrews will have a glorious role as the Swedish servant 
girl. The play will be elaborately mounted. "Mrs. Temple's 
Telegram" will follow "What Happened to Jones." 



The Fourth of July Eye 

An Ounce of Prevention against Serious Injury suggests Murine Eye 
Remedy as a First Aid. Try Murine in your Eyes before the Doctor ar- 
rives. Murine Soothes Eye Pain; Reduces Inflammation. 



Princess Theatre , ™^pr?^°™ 

S. Lovench, Manager Phone West 663 

INTERNATIONAL GRAND OPERA COMPANY. Next week's 

Repertoire: 

Monday. TRAVIATA. 

Tuesday and Saturday Evenings, Maseagni's l/AMK'O FRITZ. 

Wednesday matin..' FE] >ORA, 

Wednesday Evrninur, FAUST. 

Thursday and Sunday Qvertlngs, OTELLO. 

First appearance of the Famous I nor, SAMOILOFF, 

Friday Evening;, CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA and 'I PAGLIACCI. 

Saturday Matinee, THE BARBER OF SEVILLE 

Prices. $2.00 $1.50, $1.00. 50c, 

T//7 Ji? / y) Ol Ci V/j Oil /'V*Z? Valencia Sfreet. between 13th and 14ih 
V U/VZ'fVL'l/U/ ± IvK/XAjVI & Telephone. Market 17 

This Sunday afternoon and evening, last times «»f Arthur Cun- 
ningham in 

ARRAH NA POGUE 
Start inc Monday ovenini:. July 5th I leorge 1 1 Broadhurst's Best 
and RrieM'-st Farce 

WHAT HAPPENED TO JONES 

With Paid McAllister and the full strength of the Valencia Stock 

Comp: 

Wednesday matinoi's 25c. ; Satin day and Sunday matinees. 10c. 

86c 85c, and 50c. Even ' to II. Seats on sale a i th--- 

Emporium. 

Corner Sutter and Steiner Streeta 
Phone Wetf 1400 
Relasco A- Mavt»r. Ownera and Managers. Absolutely Clans A Rtda 

Commem-inff with matinee Monday. July 5th, FLORENCE ROB- 
ERTS, with Thurlow B ih.> Alcazar players in Ai- 
phonj"- i taudet'B Famous play, 

SAPHO, 
In which Miss Roberts mad.- one of her greatest hits at th 
I 
Prices — Evenings, 86c. to f] Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 25c. 



New Alcazar Theatre 



American Theatre M * 



Harket Si. mr Seventh. Phone Market 381 
The playhouse of comfort and safety 
This Saturday matinee and night, last tin- 
THE BLUE MOUSE 
n< Ing Sunday matinee .lulv ith. for PBOFLB WITH RE1> 
i yn's 

THREE WEEKS 
Prices. Evenings :':■■ I >1 ''""'. M-'' .-.■ ■■- - ■' ' . md 75c. 



New Orpheum 



OFarrell Street. 

Bet. Stockton and Powell. 



Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre tn Amend. 
Wet k beginning this Sundav 

ARTISTIC VAUDEVILLE 

George Hlilnmn and hi:- 
ind Clark: H 
til Ma 

Talk of th>* 

vPT'lE CUFF, t - nesque 

Dancer. , . 

Evening pri Box seats. $1 Matinee prices 

(except Stir PHI INE 

LAS 70 



Van Ness Theatre 



CORNER VAN NESS AVB 
AND GROVE STREET. 
Phona Market 900 
Beginning Sundav night. July 4th. Matinee Monday and Saturday 
York production of the operatic sensation 
of the - 

THE MERRY WIDOW. 

Music by Franz Lehar. -Madam Butterfly" Grand Opera Orches- 
tra. One hundred in company. 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 3, 1909 





o 

The teapot has not been rattling as daintily as though it were 
shod with satin. Small wonder, since any one may read by all 
the signs and signals of the tea leaves that another scandal was 
chilled in the brewing. There has been a jewel theft in society, 
but this tine it has not concerned those in the particular set 
known as the Blingum clique. Not long ago there came to 
town a young foreigner, claiming that his ancestry was of the 
same Hungarian gulash as that for which Miss Gladys Vander- 
bilt sold her heritage. He lived at a smart hotel, had plenty of 
money, apparently, and disclaimed any regard for society — in- 
sisted that the thing bored him. He did not penetrate into 
the sacred inner circle, but was taken up by one of the sets that 
has an erect ami full-grown place in the society columns. Two 
sisters, who go about a great deal in the army set, were par- 
ticularly interested in the young "nobleman," who played a 
ripping game of bridge, and was much sought after by the bridge 
enthusiasts in that set. About two weeks ago, the sisters gave 
a house party at their country home near San Rafael, and of 
course used as exhibit A their Hungarian nobleman. On Sun- 
day morning their mother missed all her rings — about $3,000 
worth, which she had carelessly left on a wash-stand the night 
before. The young nobleman boldly suggested that the police 
be summoned and every one be searched. But the stalwart and 
husky brother of the household, who "doesn't go much on foreign- 
ers, anyway," asked for a little private talk with the gentleman 
from Hungary. He must have put h ; m through a third degree 
that would give the police pointers, for at the end of an hour 
the Hungarian was on his way to the train, and before night-fall 
he was speeding from California. Then the brother produced the 
rings, which he said had, after all, been found under the wash- 
stand, and of course the .guests had to politely pretend to believe 
him. 

So the scandal has not gained general publicity, like the affair 
of the Swedish "nobleman" rudely incarcerated in jail. Possi- 
bly it would be better if all these affairs were thoroughly venti- 
lated on the public clothes line. It would help to establish a taut 
"dead line" through which pseudo noblemen would not dare 
pass. San Francisco is altogether too credulous in the matter 
of accepting these people at their own valuation. The New; 
York smart set has a neat set of rules and distinctions — it has 
learned the code of impostors, and moreover unless a title is worth 
jubilant gushing, it does not illuminate the way for the title. 
But out here a count may expand to the circumferance of the 
social horizon. For example, "Count" D'Abbans, the former 
attache in the French consulate. Without the handle to his 
name, this young man would never have enjoyed the intoxicat- 
ing sense of feeling that even Burlingame was vibrant with wel- 
come for him. His impossibilities were taken as the mere per- 
quisites of nobility. From any other man his small talk to his 
partners at the dance would have been considered insulting, but 
the girls who blushed at them fancied that in their hearts they 
paid dues to provincialism. They imagined that such persiflage 
was the thing in the impenetrable drawing rooms of aristocratic 
France. 

Then the young Frenchman departed in a storm of indignation 
that had been busily brewing in the French colonv from the 
day of his arrival. The final blow came from Paris— D'Abbans 
has been forbidden to use the title "count," having no legitimate 
claim to it. No one denies that he comes of a good French fam- 
ily, but he is not a "count." How long would honors have been 
heaped on him here if the smart set had known that? 

Then came a Swedish nobleman — who managed to meet a lot 
of good people. He sent books and candy to Miss Virgilia 
Bogue, who is to be Queen of the Portola festival, and Miss 
Boque, an exception among girls, as promptly returned his 
offerings. Nevertheless, when he is jailed he dared mention 
Miss Bogue as one of his many society friends. Which shows 
the necessity of flying danger signals whenever these men pre- 
sent themselves with pasteboard pretensions. 

Two weddings made a fragrant orange blossom wreath for 



tr. 



FAIRMONT HOTEL 



^ 



Unique among the Hotels of the - world 
in that every room is an outside room and 
EVERY room has its attached bath. 

Rates from $2.60 per day upwards. 



ivPalace Hotel Company 



j 



Wednesday. In the morning Miss Alyce Sullivan became Mrs. 
Frederick Lawrence Murphy at a nuptial service read by Arch- 
bishop Eiordan at St. Bridgid's church. Six bridesmaids and 
a maid of honor lent lovely color to the bridal party, which 
showed lovely tones of pink against the shimmering white of the 
bride's gown. About seventy-five friends were bidden to the 
wedding breakfast, and after the honeymoon in the South there 
is to be a big reception in the home now being prepared for Mr. 
and Mrs. Murphy. 

Wednesday evening the Presidio was all a-flutter with the 
fascinating vibrations that till the air when a wedding is to be 
solemnized in the pretty little chapel. Promptly at eight o'clock, 
Lieutenant Williams gave his sister, Miss Willis Williams, into 
the keeping of his brother-officer, Lieutenant Eugene Walker. ■ 
The bride made a lively picture, and so did her one attendant, 
Miss Henrietta Walker, a sister of the bridegroom. 

Aside from wedding bells, the week has not made a noise like 
festivity. Every one has been preparing to spend the week-end 
out of town, the Fourth, giving an extra day for inviting one's 
soul into the country. House-parties are as thick as the leaves 
of Vallambrosa, . and unpopular indeed is the society maid or 
man who has not received a bid to a house-party. Down Bur- 
lingame way there is talk of an informal dance at the club house 
on Monday night, and no doubt the talk will crystallize into 
reality. 

Burlingame is having merry dances most of the time, with the 
rumors that go waltzing out of the preserves. The Hobarts have 
been the latest victims of publicity, a morning paper insisting 
that they have separated, and it hangs its insistence on no 
stronger peg than that Mrs. Hobart's summer plans do not in- 
clude her husband. Neither did they last year, nor the year be- 
fore that! Last summer Mr. Hobart visited Bolinas, where his 
family were domiciled, just one day. Every one knows that the 
Hobarts have not found matrimony an always smooth sailing 
sea, but few credit that the breakers have capsized their boat, 
gossip to the contrary notwithstanding. 

Mrs. Eleanor Martin entertained a number of friends infor- 
mally at luncheon the other day, in the Hotel St. Francis, Baron 
and Baroness Von Schroeder being among her guests. At an- 
other table were Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Eastland and Miss Virginia 
Jolliffe. 

The usual Saturday evening dance was held at Hotel Kafael, 
which was enjoyed by the guests and their invited friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Grant came up from their San Jose 
home last week and have been at the St. Francis for the past few 
days. 



An Ideal Auto Control Station 

THE VENDOME, San Jose 

Here are a few delightful trips: 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

Mount Hamilton 

Monterey 

Santa Clara Valley 

Mission San Jose 

Santa Cruz 

Our Garage at your service. The Vendome offers 
every comfort for week end visitors. 

H. W. LAKE, Mgr. 



July 3, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



15 



With the first of a series of summer band concerts in Pacific 
Grove, on Saturday night of last week, came out the crowd of 
visitors — and it was a good-sized one, despite the fact that few 
children are as yet here, the schools only just now closing. The 
one and only Camillo, the far-famed band leader, has the local 
musicians in charge this year, with the result that the program 
numbers were rendered on the opening night in a manner to 
hold the attention of the music lovers. The electrical display, in 
streamers across the main thoroughfare of the town, showed, on 
the promenade, a throng of merry-makers that promises a gay 
summer on the once sedate folks tenting ground. A large num- 
ber of motor parties were in town, some for the week-end, while 
others are here for the month or full season. J. Mills, who, in 
his Cadillac, haa motored all over the country, coming from Flor- 
ida to the coast, is down from the city. His family joined him 
this week, and they will remain, probably, all summer. The C. 
Lees, of 2620 Pierce street, San Francisco, are occupying the 
handsome Bruguiere home on the hill overlooking Monterey and 
the bay. Their car, with members of the family, is often to be 
seen on this side of the Peninsula. Among others driving in 
during the week were J. Pasituskey and party. Mr. Pasituskey 
drove his Mitchell machine from Oakland. Mr. and Mrs. L. 
W. Hemphill, who came from Orange in their Tourist ; P. 
Schultz, with his family, who ran down from San Jose in his 
Tourist; G. A. Bull drove his sturdy Mitchell runabout over 
from Santa Cruz in less than three hours, a distance of 61 miles, 
Tuesday. 

Admiral and" Mrs. H. W. H. Whiting and Dr. A. Fahrenholt, 
U. S. N., were guests of Mrs. Jaques Loeb during the week. 

Mirza Ali Khuli Khan is another distinguished visitor to the 
Grove. Registering at Pacific Grove Hotel from Washington, 
D. C.j on the 23d, he has taken a cottage near to the shore, and 
will remain some time. Mrs. Kelley, widow of the late Captain 
George Kelley, has returned to her Pacific Grove summer quar- 
ters, and with her family will remain until early fall. Mrs. A. 
M. Drew, with her daughter. Miss Gertrude, a student at Ber- 
keley, and her son Arthur, who will finish this year at Stanford, 
is here from Fresno, and a number of others are coming in from 
the valley town. Mr. Harry Fonda, the artist and singer, has 
returned to his Monterey home after a two weeks' visit to San 
Francisco, where he was in attendance on grand opera several 
nights. Mr. and Mrs. H. R. O'Bryan ami Miss Mabel O'Bryan 
attended the wedding of Miss Vivian Black and Sherwood 
Rogers, which took place at Trinity Church, San .lose, on the 
morning of the 30th. 

Among the recent visitors to San Francisco arc .Mr. .mil Mrs. 
Archibaldo Burns, of Chihuahua, Mexico, who are al pr« 
the guests of the Fairmont Hotel. Mr. Burns is associated with :i 
number of other wealthy Mexicans, and they practically control 
the entire cotton output of that country. They hare immense 
plantations on the Nasas River in the departmi ramento, 

Mexico. In addition to these large interests, Mr. Burns is widely 
known in his own country as one of the largest mining opera 
His mines are located at Buenos Ayres, in Chihuahua, Mei 
and have been in the possession of his and his wife's family for a 
number of years. They are said to be among the richest in that 
part of the country. The young millionaire is closely connected 
with Enrique Creel, the ambassador from M • o to Washing! 
Mrs. Burns' family is also well known in the society of M 
City. This is Mrs. Burns' tirst visit to California, and as yet she 
does noi speak English very fluently, although Mr. Burns do 
having been educated in this country. The BurnseS "ill go to 
Del Monte for the holidays, after whii me 

in this city, prior to their departure for Europe. 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

APACE 'WITH SCIENCE 



WHATEVER COMFORT IS KNOWN 

TO ANY TRAVELER IS AT THE 

COMMAND OF EVERY GUEST. 



Under the management of James Woods 



HOTEL VICTORIA 

N. E. cor. Bush and Stockton 

Centrally Located 

A Modern and Up-To-Date Family Hotel. 
Sun in Every Room. Elaborate Furnish- 
ings. Excellent Cuisine. Large Lobby and 
Reception Room. Grill Room. Dining Room 

European and American Plan 



Hotel Rafael 



SAN RAFAEL 



Now Open 



Buy your tickets and check 

your baggage direct to 

San Rafael 



Under the management of 
MR. J. H. HOLMES 

Also of the Hotel Green. Pasadena 



Hotel Del Monte 

For the Holidays 

Special attractions for the 3od. 4th and 5th. 
Grand "al fresco" Spanish Lunch under the trees at 
PEBBLE BEACH at 12:»0 p. m. Monday. July 5th 

to which all guests of the Hotel are invited. 
Elaborate fireworks display on the Lawn of the 
Hotel. 

Write or wire Tor reservations. 

H. R. WARNER. Manager. 



Hotel Westminster 



Los Angeles, Cal. 

Fourth tad Main So 



American Plan 

REOPENED 

Rates per Day. $2.50 Rooms without Bath. 
Rooms with Bath. W.OO. (3.50 and W.OO. 



European Plan 

$1.00 per day and up 
With bath. 1160 and up 



F. O. JOHNSON. Proprietor 



THE PENINSULA 



The big. first-class hotel that is only half an hour's ride from 
San Francisco. 

THE PENINSULA 

The leading- suburban hotel of central California, with the 
splendid reputation for service, table and general conditions. 

THE PENINSULA 

The hotel with all the comforts that the most fastidious could 
desire. Special rates in tne bachelors" Quarters. 

JAS. H. DOOLITTLE, Manager, San Mateo. Cal. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 3, 1909 




Harry MoGowan, Jr., the son of Mrs. H. H. McGowan of 
Paraiso Springs, Monterey Countv, but residing in Oakland, is 
the recipient of many congratulations these days, on account 
of the fine showing he made in the elocution exercises of Santa 
Clara College last Tuesday. Young McGowan received first 
prize in the shape of the Owl medal, which was established by 
the former literary publication of that name. Bishop McConnell 
made the presentation. 

Among those registered from Pasadena this week at Hotel 
Rafael are William P. Staats, Mr. and Mrs. Marcus A. Hall, 
Frank H. Rider and Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Stnbbs. 

Robert S. Clark has returned to Hotel Rafael after a visit io 
the exposition. 

A tennis tournament for the benefit of Hill Farm was held 
at Hotel Rafael courts on June 24th. and a goodly number wit- 
nessed the game. 

R. S. Stubbs, of Tucson, a nephew of the eminent railroad 
magnate, J. C. Stubbs, was a guest of the Hotel St. Francis for 
several days last week. 

Mrs. P. M. Remillard and daughter have returned to Hotel 
Rafael after an absence of a week at different points of interest. 

At a prettily appointed dinner in the St. Francis last week, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Sutro entertained Assistant Paymaster 
Eugene H. Douglas, H. S. N., and Mrs. Douglas, Miss* Helen 
Sullivan, Miss Mabel Gregory, Dr. Arnold Genthe, and Paymas- 
ter Frank Beeeher, IT. S. X. 

Dr. Joseph Edward Stubbs. President of the University of 
Nevada, spent most of last week at the Hotel St. Francis. 

Mr. J. R. Van Nuys, owner of the famous Van Nuys Hotel, 
of Los Angeles, was a guest of the Hotel St. Francis last week. 

The Lincoln Godfreys, of Philadelphia, are among the recenl 
arrivals at the Hotel St. Francis. 

Hother Wismer will leave Saturday for a two weeks' vacation 
at Monterey, and later at Aptos, as guest of Mr. and Mrs. W. T. 
Sesnon. 

Doings at Del Monte over tlie Holidays. ■ 

Guests of Del Monte over the week-end and the holidays will 
be treated to a novel entertainment in the form of an "al fresco 
Spanish lunch," which Manager Warner is preparing to serve 
under the trees at picturesque Pebble Beach on the Seventeen 
Mile Drive. There will be all kinds of hot and tasty Spanish 
dishes, served in the real Spanish way, at this affair, which 
will take place on Monday at 12.30 o'clock. All the guests of the 
hotel are invited to this. ' Then there will be an elaborate display 
of fireworks on the lawn of the hotel in the evening, and the 
usual informal hop on Saturday night. From present indications 
there will be a large crowd at this popular resort, the motor con- 
tingent being particularly large. The roads to Del Monte are re- 
ported to be in first-class shape, and the trip is one that never 
grows tiresome. 

* * * 

Paso Robles Hot Springs. 

This popular resort has been crowded the past few months with 
many of the representative people from all over the State. San 
Francisco has been well to the front in her representation. Just 
at present there are a goodly number there from the city. There 
have been more permanent guests than ever before, and many 
have prolonged their stay to two or three months. Among the 
most enthusiastic riders has been Miss Dorothy Boericke, the 
popular daughter of Dr. and Mis. William Boericke of this city. 
Miss Boericke purchased one of the handsomest saddle horses in 
this section, and has had it shipped to her summer home in 
Mill Valley, where she will ride a great deal during the summer. 
A number of the hotel guests have their automobiles with them 
and take daily trips over the excellent roads into the surrounding 
country. 



A Sane Fourth of July 
Murine Eye Remedy as a First Aid. Doesn't Smart; Soothes Eye Pain. 

WEDDING PRESENTS. 
The choicest variety to select from at Marsh's, corner Cal 
fornia and Polk streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 




FORMUtmmmnc 

Ridffwav: Limited: Ettablittud 1836. 

Of all accommodating Grocers 
" There is no tea just as good." 

RIDGWATS supplied tea for the late Queen Victoria's use for 
forty years. 

RIDGWAYS' prices are no greater than other high-grade teas 
that do not compare with Rldgways In quality. 

PRICES, 50c, 65c, 75c, $1.00 PER POUND. ASK YOUR GROCER 



W.W.Montague & Co. 



EUREKA STOVES AND 
RANGES, HOTEL 
KITCHEN OUTFITS A 
SPECIALTY.'ALASKA" 
& "OPAL" REFRIGER- 
ATORS, MANTELS, 
GRATES, TILES. 



NOW LOCATED AT 557-563 MARKET STREET 

Opposite junction Sutter and Sansome Streets Phone Douglas 4640 



\ 




/ 



CURES 



/ 



•HEADACHES 

10*35*50* &*1°P Bottles* 



Juts 3, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



l? 



WOMAN'S TENNIS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP. 

On Monday, July 5th, Miss Haze) HotcfiMsSj oi r Berkeley, Cal., 
will meet Miss May Sutton, of Pasadena, on the tennis courts of 
the Hotel Rafael. 

As Miss Sutton has won the championship of England a num- 
ber of times, and also decisively beaten all American women, and 
Miss" Hotchkiss has also just covered herself with glory by 
all three national championships at Philadelphia, the 




Hotel Rafael and Grounds, San Rafael. 



match next Monday may practically be considered as deciding the 
woman's world championship. 

Miss Hotchkiss has by far the prettier style of play, perform- 
ing more nearly to the men's stroke than any other woman in 
America. She is swift and accurate, and possesses a i hop stroke 
that has always worried Miss Sutton more than any style of game. 

Miss Sutton is playing to-day better than she lias ever played, 
and recently won from her sister, Florence, without the loss of 
a single game; indeed, losing only twelve points in the whole 
match. She is probably the strongest woman player the world 
has ever seen, and drives her balls with terrific force and deadl] 
accuracy. 

Play will commence sharply at 8:30 o'clock Monday after- 
noon, and the match will also decide the possession of two 
ful silver loving cups,' one the challenge cup offered by the 
Pacific Lawn Tennis Association, and the other donated bj Mr. 
.1. II. Holmes, manager of the Hotel Kaifl il. 



OBITUARY. 

Loving memory alone Burrives of George I I for the 

kindly old pioneer ha- passed beyond. "Uncle George," Bohem- 
ian, raconteur of good stories, and Btored with the lore 
argonauts, the connecting link between whai »as and is. and of 
il,',, character thai conformed to eond is as he found them, 
seemed to have claim upon the immortalities. Through a life oi 
activity and vicissitudes the years bore lightly upon him. and 
cheer found Banctuary in bis heart until the last. 
George" eared more for loving friendships than the dollar, and 
despite the reign of faction and strife, of cliques that east shad- 
ows upon life, Bromley was above '.hem all. and looked only upon 
the sunshine. That is how he passed beyond the line of D 
nerian. ami went to bis grave regretted and beloved. 

Q ge I Bromley, affectionafely referred TJncle 

George," was bom at Norwich. Conn., April 14, 1817. At the 
early age of ten years, he took up the tasks of life in his father*; 
rope walk. At thirteen the BUTging Ocean lured him to its 
. and he was tossed about from as a youth on a 

whaler. He came to San Francisco January, 1851, 5 
house employee, and from there he took service as ma! 
Stockton steamer. He then became California's 
securing thai position on the Sacramento Valley Bai 
first line on this side of tl -. and the inspira: 

building of the Pacific railroads, lie then venture,! il 
and purchased the Continental Hotel 

ien-tsin. I 
one of the founders of the Bohemian Club, and no jinks or 
gathering of thai iout his j I 

Kind: 

iner impulses which made all men to him of kin. 



DIVIDEND NOTICES OF THE ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

OFFICE OF THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, corner 
Market, McAllister and Jones streets (member of Associated Savings 
Banks of San Francisco), San Francisco, June 2S, 1909. At a meeting of 
the Board of Directors of this society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of three and eight-tenths (3 S-10) per cent per an- 
num on all deposits for the six months ending June 30. 1909, free from 
all' taxes, and payable on and after July 1. 1909; dividends not drawn will 
be added to depositors" accounts, and become a part thereof, and will earn 
dividend from July 1, 1909; deposits made on or before July 10, 1909, wilt 
draw interest from July 1, 1909. 
R. M. TOBIN, Secretary, 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 526 California St.; 
Mission Branch, 2572 Mission St., near 22d; Richmond branch, 432 Clement 
street, between 5th and tith avenues. For the half year ending June 30, 
1909, a dividend has been declared at -the rate of four (4) per cent per 
annum on all deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Thursday. July 
1, 1909. Dividends not called for are added to and bear the same rate of 
interest as the principal from July 1. 1909. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK. 783 Market street, near Fourth. For 
the half year ending June 30, 1909. a dividend at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum on all savings deposits, free of taxes, payable on and 
after Thursday, July 1. 1909. Dividends not called for are added to and 
bear the same rate of interest as the principal from July 1, 1909. 

H.C.KLEVESAHL, Cashier. 

THE SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 101 Montgomery St., corner 
Sutter street. For the half year ending June 30, 1909, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free 
of taxes, payable on and after Thursday, July 1, 1909. Dividends not 
drawn become part of deposit accounts, and earn dividends at the same 
rate, from July 1st. Money deposited on or before July 10th will earn 
interest from July 1st. 

WM. A. BOSTON, Cashier. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, N. W. Cor. California and Mont- 
gomery streets. For the half year ending June 30. 1909. dividends have 
been declared at the rates per annum of four and one-eighth (4 1-8) per 
cent on term deposits, and four (4) per cent on ordinary deposits, free 
of taxes, payable on and afler Thursday, July 1, 1909. A dividend not 
drawn will be added to the deposit account, becomes a part thereof, and 
earns dividend from July 1st. Money deposited on or before the 10th day 
of July will receive dividend from July 1st. 

R. M. WELCH, Cashier. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK, u6 Montgomery Street.— For the half year ending June 
30, iqoq. dividends upon all deposits at the rate of four (41 per cent per annum, free of 
taxes, will be payable on and after July i. iqoq. 

FRED W. RAY. Secretary 

DIVIDEND NOTICES 

ITALIAN-AMERICAN BANK. 460 Montgomery Street, corner Sarramento Street— 
For the half year ending June 10. iqoq. a dividend has been declared by this bank at the 
rate of 4 per cent per annum on all savings deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after 
Thursday. July 1. iqoq. Dividends not drawn become part of deposit account, and earn 
Interest at the same rate from July 1st. Money deposited befoie July 15th. will earn 
interest from July 1st. 

ANDREA SBARBORO. President. A. E. SBARBORO, Cashier. 

THE CONTIXEN DING ami LOAM ASSOCIATION, junction 

of Golden Gate avenue, Taylor and M San Francisco, Cal.. will 

i'ii July 1. 1909, pas the usual Interest 01 cent per annum on 

time deposits "' Class V' StOCk, lour ifi per cent per annum on ordinary 
or class i> stock. The interest on ordinary deposits, if not withdrawn. 
will be added to the principal and thereafter draw interest at the same 
rale. WASHINGTON DODGE, President; WILLIAM CORBIN, Secretary. 

CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA, Market and Sansome 
streets. Branches, 824 Van Ness avenue and 3039 sixteenth St. For the 
half year ending June 30. 1909. a dividend has b, > I OD deposits In 

the savings department of this bank at the rate of four (4) per cent per 
annum, free on and after Thursday, July 1, 1909. 

IHvldends not called l"r are added to and bear the same rate of Interest 
as the principal from July 1. 1909. 

E G TOGNAZZ1. .Manager. 

FRENCH SA VINOS BANK. 108 Sutter street-— F01 the half yeai 

;i dividend has been I the rat,- of four (4) per. 

cent per >■ rtum on all deposits, free of taxi on and after Thurs- 

DOt called for air added to and bear the 
same rati of Interest is the i>: Im i pal from July 1. 1 

CHARLES CARPT, President 

National Fire Insurance Company of Hartford 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

CAPITAL »1. 000.000.00 

ASSETS 8.S60.000.00 

SURPLUS I'" POLICY HOLDERS 3.17S.458.«4 

McNEAR & WAYMAN. GENERAL AGENTS. 

National Building, San Francisco 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 3, 1909 



($m>0tiott0 at tljp lay 



The Bond Mill Kot 

RlPE FOE Ol'EKATlON. 



The bond mill will not go into op- 
eration. Not because the people of 
San Francisco were not sufficiently 
enlightened or educated as to the 
character and quality of the bundle of projects submitted for 
their endorsement to a future promise to pay, but because they 
were fully acquainted with them. That they had knowledge of 
what they were doing is shown by their perspicacity in picking 
out the Technical School from the job lot of propositions. This 
clatter about the issues not being understood is simply the wail 
of the interested ones to hide chagrin over rout and defeat. The 
projects were purposely baited at the lime of the year when 
thousands who would have added their ballots to the pile of 
negatives registered so successfully against them, were on their 
vacation. The absentees are of the class who pay taxes, and 
therefore the indications are they are not of the calibre to favor 
the piling of $20,000,000 into the municipal treasury, to be frit- 
tered away by the order of politicians who are now looming up 
ominously on the horizon. The people of San Francisco are sus- 
picious of the Municipal Government. The stench of the Sehmite 
administration still assails the nostrils, and the red fire that 
glares about the District Attorney's office, together with the 
horde of imported detectives that are fattening for special and 
personal reasons at the expense of the taxpayers is not. conducive 
to trust. Before San Francisco property owners and citizens, 
who wish it weli, will consent to the expenditure of millions, 
peace must be established and acrimonious dissensions end. For 
three years the prosecution jamboree has raged. Hundreds of 
thousands of dollars have teen expended, the town has been in- 
undated with torrents of various styles of denunciations, two 
subsidized organs have yelped and blackguarded everybody, and 
the result of the mountainous borning is Ruef, and his case is on 
appeal. Whether Calhoun is guilty or not was threshed out be- 
fore a trial judge, who did not incline enthusiastically to his 
side of the case, and ten out of twelve jurymen declared in favor 
of his innocence. The jury was selected after everybody available 
had been summoned, and the hired Hessians of the District 
Attorney's staff had sniffed into their family affairs, social con- 
ditions and affiliations since the landing of their forefathers on 
Plymouth Rock. The case was the strongest in the District 
Attorney's deck, and the evidence covered everything from the 
shooting of Heney by a lunatic, his patriotism, "love of country, 
the blowing up of "Jim" Gallagher's house, down to the exposi- 
tion of the sacred, respectable Spreckels. It was all beautiful, 
grand and thrilling, as an entertainment for lovers of melo- 
drama, but it did not furnish the least thread of evidence that 
passes current with American jurors when called upon 
tence men to shame and obliquy. It was noise and smoke with- 
out fact or flame. This melodramatic farce cost the people of 
San Francisco over $100,000, and to attain this climax, nearly 
a score of the worst and most villainous gang of corrupt and 
crooked officials that ever cursed a municipality were given im- 
munity. 



The Clamob Stile 

is Raging. 



After this rout, defeat and fiasco, a 
continuous performance of the prose- 
cution of Calhoun is promised. It 
means more money to the Hessians, 
more blackguarding in the newspapers, and a'case in which the 
evidence will be less convincing than in the trial just ended. 
Whether Mr. Calhoun is guilty or not the direct evidence or 
circumstantial evidence to convince any American jury of that 
fact has not been produced, and if it were available', Mr. Henev 
and Mr. Spreckels would have presented it in a gold mounted 
jewel case at the trial just ended. The prosecution covers its 
failures by a systematic and persistent blackguardism of anybody 
and everybody who does not applaud their ineffective, extrava- 
gant and red fire methods of trying to stuff somebody into jail 
against whom the evidence of Mr. Spreckels goes to show he had 
a spite. The result is, that those who are independent of the 
Spreckels and Calhoun warfare, yet who are the ablest and mosl 
progressive men in the community, refuse to become target- Eor 
abuse by aspiring for the Mayoralty. As a consequence, ft is the 
politician of the McCarthy stripe who ominously fills the hori- 



zon. McCarthy stands for the labor trust, which was principally 
concerned in the acquisition of the Geary street road, a contrap- 
tion which the voters of this city were not inclined to put into 
their paws at the cost of taxpayers' money. With hostlers in the 
fire department receiving $100 a month, the union schedule calls 
for $75, it is easy to apprehend what conductors, motormen and 
axle-greasers would be paid if the labor trust had the city by the 
throat. There are many heads of families, whose positions re- 
quire the exercise of intelligence, integrity and the training of 
years, who do not receive a hostler's pay, and they, in regard 
for the equities, are not disposed to throw millions of dollars in 
the way of those who thrive by doing politics and receive unjust 
wage by wielding the black-jack of the union. The city has 
experienced two labor administrations, and the District Attor- 
ney's office has been active ever since. A third reign is fear- 
somely anticipated, and is made possible by the blackguard 
methods and policies of the prosecution striving to achieve by 
defamation and hubbub what they cannot do with the support of 
evidence at hand. The News Letter is not exaggerating the 
fact in asserting that these are the reasons why all the projects, 
excepting the Technical School, were defeated by the voters, and 
the keeping up the merry-go-round of elections is frittering away- 
public money to no purpose. A resubmission of any of them or 
all of them will meet with a more pronounced defeat than thai 
last given. Restoration of normal conditions and the election 
of those great enough to be beyond and above the clanging fac- 
tions that harass and destroy the harmony of the community, 
will court confidence and justify the faith of taxpayers in voting 
to expend their money. 



The Lincoln Realty block, one of the big business palaces 

of the' city, at the southeast corner of Market and Fifth streets, 
is about completed, and is already taken up by tenants, who are 
rapidly opening their varied establishments of trade in the new 
location. The building is an adornment to Market street, and 



LIQUEUR 



PERES CHARTREUX 



GREEN 

AND 

YELLOW 




GREEN 

AND 

YELLOW 



The original and genuine Chartreuse has always been and 
still is made by the Carthusian Monks (Peres Chartreux), who, 
since their expulsion from France, have been located at Tarra- 
gona, Spain; and, although the old labels and insignia originated 
by the Monks have been adjudged by the Federal Courts of this 
country to be still the exclusive property of the Monks, their 
world renowned product is nowadays known as "Liqueur Peres 
Chartreux." 

At first-class Wine Merchants. Grocers. Hotels Cafes 

Batjer & Co., 46 Broadway. New York, N. Y. 

Sole Agents for United States. 



July 3, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



21 



an enterprise in which tho municipality profits by lease of ground 
to the enterprising builders. The date of the big opening is 
July loth. 

I be Clairion Clothing Company, occupying one of the splen- 
did stores with a varied stock of clothing lines. 

The City and County Bank will remove to the corner store, 
which is being splendidly fitted up. 

Mrs. E. Lynch also figures among the list of tenants, and 
the noted milliner and her son are going to New York to secure 
a stock of the latest importations with which to make opening 
displays. 

Charles Brown & Sons will open in the block. 

Schwartz & Goodman held a grand opening in their handsome 
new store on June 26th, and over 20,000 people called to wish 
them luck. The floral display on the occasion was the most note- 
worthy ever made by any business house in this city. 

Wright's shoe store is also in this block, as also the Pacific 
Syndicate Company. 

Shirpser & Samuels, the noted opticians, adjoin the City and 
County Bank in an elegantly fitted store. 

The Albert S. Samuels Company, jewelers and opticians, make 
;i grand display in their lines in one of the stores. 

Goldstein & Co., the famous and pioneer costumers, occupy 
the greater part of one floor, with their stock in trade and art. 



A young woman screaming for help, and in fear, rushed 

madly into the office of the Sentinel Hotel, Yosemite Valley, 
last Monday, and frantically danced about the day clerk, plead- 
ing for protection from the wild man clad in skins and wielding 
a club following in close pursuit of the fleeing damsel. 

Several women guests fainted in fright at the terrifying ap- 
parition of the fierce hairy man. The wild man, with a chortle 
of guttural defiance, waved his club and, turning about, hastily 
made his way into the cover of the surrounding copse. A party 
was made up, and the savage tracked to his lair, a cave near the 
Yosemite Falls. There, at the opening, sat a weird witch, and 
stealthily coming from the opening in the rocks was the ferocious 
wild man, with fingers twitching and eyes aglow with unholy 
fire of blood and lust, preparing to pounce upon his victim. A 
cry of horror went up from the armed auditors. The witch 
sprang up in fear. The wild man stood abashed, and out from 
the bushes entered a dapper young fellow wroth with indignation. 

"What in the name of Ferenz Moliiar are von coming around 
here and spoiling my scene?" he thundered in the direction of 
the rescuing knights. They were astoundedl li was the moving 
picture combine getting lip lis films. The wild man had DOl 
rehearsed his part, and had pursued the young lad] 
mistake for the heroine. This story is as related in the words 
of Mr. Frank Miner who. with his family, have been spending 
their vacation in the valley. 

THE BLEEDING HEART. 

Love's hidden pearl is shining yet, 

And Love's sealed casket bears the Bame device 

As it bore of old; 

The tears \\ h h w hi b. mine ej " wel 

K811 as yesterday they rolled, 

Roll as they shall roll to-morrow. 

Fraught with blood Ice, 

I i. 'in the same fountain of eternal sorrow. 

Ah. could my heart but speak, 
Or thou divine 
What Passion-flower is this 
That lent its color to th thine : 

\\ 'hat Ruby blushes o'er thy lovely cheek, 
Dreaming of the sun's warm 
In the darkness of the mine! 
V ■. I ould my heart but speak. 
Or thou divine! — R. .1. Nicho 



Hooray ! 



Bah I Rah I Rah I Hip! Hip! 

Fourth of July in San .1 
Three big days on lntorurban Raihi 
trsion tickets sold at our offices in San dose and Los 
for 30-mile ride through orchard? and foothills, witl 
over at Saratoga, - tnd San Jose ot Los 

10 rents for round tri a can '.■■.. used on i thi r 3d, 4th 

or .">th of July. Our regular Congress Springs ill also 

1 for the three 



FOURTH AT DEL MONTE. 

The national anniversary is to he fittingly celebrated at Del 
Monte, Monday, July 5th, by a grand band concert at the lodge 
at Pebble Beach and the spread of a Spanish lunch of the style 
of the days of the Don. The famous Eighteenth U. S. [nfantry 
Band, stationed at the Monterey Presidio, has been engaged for 
the concert features of the program. In the evening, between the 
hours of 9 and 12 o'clock, an illumination and pyrotechnic dis- 
play will take place on the hotel grounds. The program is one 
that will lure the many to the famous caravansary to participate 
in the proper and enjoyable celebration of the day. 



A very busy place these vacation days is that superbly- 
appointed institution, The Ellery Arms Company, of 48-52 
Geary street, and the heavy demands upon their large and varied 
stock of outing clothing and camping supplies, to say nothing 
of fishing tackle and athletic goods, must be very gratifying to 
them, and ample evidence that the sport-loving population of out- 
city appreciate the opportunity now afforded to acquire under 
one roof practically every needful article that could be used in 
their outing. 



WHY? 



Ask the man who sold you your ready-made shirts 
why he had those for his personal use made to 



order 



WHY? 



D. C. HEGER, 243 Kearny St., San Francisco 

Shirts and Underwear to Order Phone Douglas 3641 



MANZANITA HALL 



A School for Boys, Palo Alto, Cal. 

Will give i " i thorough preparation for college, while 

training him to be strong at and manly. Special attention 

■ prepai nford Absence of rigid classification 

permits rapid advancement Ample faciii tt< roi athletic sports. 
write for illustrated catalogue. 

W. A. SHEDD, HEAD MASTER. 



HOTHER WISMER, (VIOLINIST) 

pupil of Royal Highschool of Music. Berlin, and Ysaye. will resume 
teacning August 1st. Address 2946 Fillmore Street. San Francisco. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
Savage Gold and Silver Mining Company 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco, California. Location of works. 
Virginia Mining District, Storey County. State of Nevada 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting ot tne Board of Directors held on the 25J day 
of June, iqi>j, an assessment (No. 15)0? ten(io) cents per share was levied upon the 
capital stock of the corporation, payable Immediately in United Mates gold coin, to the 
secretary at the office of the company, room 116. No. 339 Bush St.. San Francisco. Calif. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 28th day of July, 
iqoo. will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment 
is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 18th day of Aug.. lyoq.to pay the delin- 
quent assessment, together with the cost of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. JOHN W. TWIGGS. Secretary. 

Office: Room 116. No. 339 Bush Street. San Francisco, California. 



Surprise Suction Sweeper 4jgg£ 

Patenied Feb. 4. 1906 



Price $12.50. Operated by hand. Large sale Eari. No exertion. 
fatigue. Can be operated by a child. Is portable. Weigh* only 5 lbs. 
Does the work of Electric Sweeper at no cos) for operation. By express 
prepaid. Just introduced West. Agents wanted in Washington. Oregon. 
California. Montana. Idaho. Ltah. Nevada. Arizona. New Mexico. Colo- 
rado. Wyoming. Send for Advertising Matter. 



Pacific Utilities Company 

Monad nock Building. San Francisco 

Controlling Exclusive Rights for Above Mentioned 
States and Territories. 



Branch Office. 542 So. Spring 
Street. Los Angeles, CaL 




24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 3, 1909 




mowsm 



ni^^^~ ^m^ 



3 



SIZE AND PRICE. 

Father's got a limousine, 

Mother's got a hat; 
Oon't know which one cost the most, 

Guess it's tit for tat. 



Good Roads I 'onvention. 

The Good Roads Convention at Del Monte on Saturday, June 
26th, was attended by members of the Automobile Club of Cali- 
fornia, the San Francisco Motor Club, the Automobile Dealers' 
Association of California, and their friends, who had motored 
or journeyed down by train. It was nearly 10 p. m. before 
Chairman M. H. de Young called the meeting to order with a few 
pleasant remarks on the influence of the motor car in promoting 
the improvement of the roads. The first speaker was Maxsden 
Man'soii, who spoke most interestingly, saying that he had ex- 
amined roads in Great Britain. France. Germany, Switzerland, 
Asia and other countries. There are in California about 50,000 
miles of places where roads ought to be. In many cases roads 
do not follow the best grades, and the natural contour of the 
country: they are made to suit the convenience of politicians. 
Road-making, instead of being regarded as an art to be prac- 
ticed by trained experts, is usually in the hands of ignorant 
and corrupt bosses, quarry owners and village grafters, who ex- 
pend the money at their disposal in the manner that best suits 
their political exigencies. There should be three classes of roads: 
State highways of the first class; county thoroughfares of the 
second class, and farm roads of the third class, constructed and 
paid for by the State, the county, and the farmer respectively. 
California has three excellent road-making materials — asphalt, 
oils and bitumenous rock: these meet the conditions better than 
any others. At her present stage of development, California 
needs good roads more than anything else. Supervisor Miller, 
of Santa Cruz, and Supervisor I.inscott, of Watsonville, ex- 
plained the conditions of road-making in their districts; and 
B. M. Chadbourne talked of roads, from an engineer's point of 
view. On Sunday the motorists drove round the famous Seven- 
teen-Mile Drive, visiting Pebble Beach Lodge and going over 
the new roads built by the Pacific Improvement Company. 
* * * 

The Motor Hunt. 

The Motor Hunt will take place on Sunday. August 29th. 
This date has been selected as far ahead as is convenient to the 
end that no other racing event or contest may interfere. The 
automobile clubs about the bay of San Francisco have signified 
the fact that they have nothing on hand that will, at that particu- 
lar time, interfere with the big Motor Hunt. 

Owing to lack of time, the map of the hunting ground will 
not be published in this week's issue. Here are a few facts 
in connection with the Motor Hunt that will give the reader an 
idea of the nature of the greatest source of amusement to be 
derived from an automobile. The Motor Hunt is now a feature 
in the East and in Europe. In Great Britain and in France 
hundreds of automobiles take part in trying to corner the 
"quarry" car. and sometime? the hunt lasts days at a time. 

Recently a hunt in the State of New York occupied the best 
part of three days. 

Participants in the Hunt to take place on the last Sunday in 
August will be required to go and return by way of the Boule- 
vard. The ticket takers will punch cards going and returning. 
Cards will not be honored before 8 a. m. or after 8 p. m. No 
cards will be recognized unless punched "boulevard going" and 
''boulevard coming." Controls are located on Boulevard, "county 
roads, and in the towns passed through. There are no BLIND 
controls; all are on good roads, and they will be suitably desig- 
nated by a yellow banner, with a black center, and a 
placard placed on fronts of hotels, garages, real estate offices, inns 
or suitable business places. 



There is to be no order observed in the placing of or location of 
controls. They may be placed at very close intervals or they 
may be located many miles apart. 

The location of the next control will not be indicated by the 
number or character of the last one visited. 

It would be a good idea for participants to take a load of pas- 
sengers along and thus obtain help in locating the quarry. 

The control keeper must punch your card as a contestant in 
the space corresponding to his station number. Secure from him 
a card carrying his control number and serially numbered. 

To the owner whose car finds the greatest number of control 
stations will be awarded a fine trophy, suitably inscribed, and pre- 
sented by the San Francisco News Letter. Should the car be 
driven by an employee or chauffeur, in addition to the above, the 
award will consist of $. r )0 in cash. 

In the Motor Hunt there are no restrictions as to make, price, 
horse-power, carrying capacity or type of cars. There is no limit 
as to the number of cars entered by any one person or firm, no 
entry blanks are needed. 

The entry fee of three dollars per car accompanied by a letter 
giving name, address, telephone number, State registry number, 
driver's name, if an employee or chauffeur, may be sent to the Au- 
tomobile Editor of the News Letter, making checks payable to the 
order of F. A. Marriott. Address 173 Market street, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Contestant cards will be mailed prior to August 15, 1909. 
Should the weather be inclement at six o'clock of the morning 
of the event, it will be postponed to the following Sunday, at the 
same hour. Contestants will be eligible to chase the quarry car 
which will be on the road traveling at moderate speed all day on 
the day of the Motor Hunt. On demand. Ibis car will stop, and 
on presentation of the contestant's card, will deliver to the con- 
testant .i quarry card; the contestant who meets (bis car the 
greatest number of times and presents the greatest Dumber of 
quarry cards will be presented with the trophy, which is valued 
at $100. There is NO CASH AWARD IN ADDITION. 

The quarry car is permitted to make short cuts, double its (rail, 
and make every effort, except excessive speed, to avoid being 
caught. This car will carry yellow banners with black center, and 
may be easily distinguished. A double crew will be on board so 
that there will be no stops except through sickness or accident. 
This car will not return to San Francisco until after 8 o'clock 
in the evening, and will become quarry at S o'clock in the morn- 
ing. Contestants are cautioned not to drive too fast. The con- 
trols are going to be placed so as to confuse you. and we want you 
to find the greatest possible number. Remember (hey may be 
at short intervals or they may be placed miles apart. You may 
rush by two or three of them. The roads are in prime condition, 
and the Hunt will take place in the finest portion of San Mateo 
and Santa Clara Counties. If you are arrested for excessive speed 
it will disqualify you. 

Owners will find this unique event a most attractive one for 
the family, affording a day of motor hunting, with the added 
incentive of winning a magnificent trophy, and a cash award to 
the chauffeur. 

The deposit of three dollars, entrance fee. will be returned to 
all who participate. 



TO THE 



ELKS 



CONVENTION 



at Los Angeles by automobile— leaving San Francisco 
either July 6th or 7th. 

THE ONLY WAY 

M y big, powerful, easy riding, seven passenger 
American Mors will take FIVE LIVE ELKS 

TO LOS ANGELES 

and return for $25.00 each. 

Engagement of this car must be made before July 
2nd. Address C. E. Haskell, Box 100, News Letter 
San Francisco. 



July 3, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



25 



The road from Cloverdale to Pieta is now in prime condition, 
and is for its entile length one of the linest roads in the State. 
Kepairs have been going on since early spring, and the road 
may now be prononneed splendid. The Pieta grade was always 
in fine condition, but this may be said of it all the way now 
from Highland Springs to Cloverdale. This gives one a drive 
along the Pieta grade and along the river amid scenery that has 
not its equal anywhere. Indeed the scenery of Lake County has 
been likened to that of Switzerland, and people who have visited 
abroad state that the Lake County vistas are not surpassed in 
Switzerland, and that the Lake County landscape and gor- 
geous mountain landscape surpasses the old country in many 
ways. The road winds along a gently rising grade for eleven 
miles, and from the Summit descends for six or seven miles more 
to Highland Springs. Nowhere can one find any sight that is 
more magnificently beautiful than this drive. 

Using Highland Springs as a control, one may go for 150 
miles in all directions over good roads and may visit hundreds 
of other resorts. There is an automobile stage line that is run 
by the Lake County Auto Stage Company, as well as a horse- 
drawn stage from Pieta which meet every train that comes in. 
These stages first go to Highland Springs, thence to Lakeport, 
and then to other Lake County resorts, but Highland Springs is 
popular because of the many amusements provided and because 
of the fact that it is so advantageously located. Besides these 
advantages, the fact that the waters are sought by many because 
of their curative value is an additional reason for the large 
numbers of people who flock yearly there. 




G. 0. Arnold driving '09 Model 8 1" h. /<. Pope Hartford in 
Rose Festival minimi road race, Portland, On-., .him- /.'. 1909. 
Distance -}■■' 8-10 mile*. Time }o inin. 68 sec. World's Record 
fur stock cars. This car was equipped with & J 'Tin*, mi, I 
fiiiixln':l the race in perfect condition. This is a phenomenal rec- 
ord fi»' these lires. owing In the fact thai they wen thout 

change in both the fifty and one hundred mite races. 

* * * 

The way the Automobile Club of California is going at things. 

it looks as though the big automobile meel in Alameda County 
is to be one of the big events of the year. 

The Board of Supen been prevailed upon to change 

its mind and lake a position favoring the big races and eon; 

and all the commercial bodies of any consequence have given the 
club their support. It was because of this action that the Super- 
visors reversed their original action, and that they now are in 
line for the event The Foothill boulevard will be used as part 
of the race course, and other roads will be used for the return. 
The News Letter is unable to announce the date for the meet, 
as the management has as yet boon unable to decide a suitable 
time. 

* * * 

The San Franciscan who is up to date should be oven 
for the Pacific Taximeter Cab Company announces the arrival of 
another shipment of taxieahs. These are Renault cars of the 
same type as the former arrivals, and which have driven so much 

satisfaction to the patrons. Mr. Fay C. Beale, the genial mana- 

has been in need of new ears for some time, as the capacity 
of the company ws o the utmost in satisfying the 

manda of the public for the popular taiicab. Beale expr -- - 

himself as "tickled to death" with the new . 

« » * 

l>r. Morris Henstein, who is the proud owner of a Bel 
ear. and who purchased the same from the Renault agency here 



of Mr. Pone Marx, writes from Europe thai he has made 8,600 
miles without a stoppage of any kind or any delay caused by 
the machine he is driving. The doctor praises the work of the 
self-starter and the' tank of compressed air, and is satisfied 
throughout with the performance of the ear ami with the trip 
which he is enjoying immensely. 

* * * 

At the Jefferson Stpiaro 
Building, corner Golden (late 
avenue and Octavia street, the 
Western Automobile Club has 
secured quarters which will be 
converted into a clubhouse on 
a most elaborate scale. 

The building has a floor 
space of 100,000 square feet, 
and there are four floors to the 
building, which has a most 
pleasant outlook on Jefferson 
Square. The first floor and 
basement will be given over to 
the library, grill, bar, barber 
shop, gymnasium, swimming 
tanks, reception rooms, baths, 
card rooms, Hammam bath es- 
tablishment, lockers, wash- 
rooms, and a store containing 
all of the most approved kinds 
of automobile supplies. 

The second floor will have 
howling alleys and billiard and 
pool tables, while the third and 
fourth floors will be reser.eil 
lor bachelor apart merits. The 
membership list is wisely re- 
stricted to five hundred, and within a very short space of time 
the list will lie complete. 

There will ho many advantages accruing from associationship 
with the club, in addition to the purely social ours. Many move- 
ments tending toward the rrnod of automobilists will receive their 

initiative from the club. \n experienced attorney will use bis 
endeavors toward Bet tiring favorable state legislation in the mat- 
ter oi roads, speed limits, etc.. and will defend mbers who 

may get into trouble and sutler unjust arrest. 

The officers and directors of the club are: Louis 11. Mi 
President; Dr. O. R. Hubbell, vice-president; William V. Lloyd, 
vice-president ; Samuel M. Samter, attorney; W. \. Wright, sec- 
atel i reasurer. 

* * * 

The Carter Car is coming to the front, and the agent, Mr. Col- 
lins, reports that the performance of the new ear on the Califor- 
-t. Mr. Collins is making preparations to 
appoint agents throughout the state. The new quarters of the 
is with Kiel iv Evans. Collins says that the work on hills 
; . rad that he lias vet to find a hill that 
otiable that the Carter car will not take. 

* • • 

There is a new ear in San Francisco. Tt is the Midland, and it 

-hows up in beautiful lines. Tt hrlon^s fo the popular priced 

Mr. (i. A. I'j.'hellif, 3 rights for 

this ear, ami it is more than likely that before this News Letter 

reaches the reader the local agency will have been |i 




. I team that is hard In beat. 
Brought up mi Panhard Oil. 



A SKIN OP BEAUTY IS A JOY FOREVER 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUDS 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

OR MAGICAL BCAUTIFICR 

Removes Tan. Pimples, FfetUes. Motn • Patches. 
Rash and Skin Diseases, sad every blefnish on 
beswty. and denes detecaon. Ii Hai stood the lest 
of 60 years: no other hat, sad ii to harmless we 
taste it la be sure ii a proper rv made Accept no 
counterfeit of similar name. The distinffuithed Dr. 
L. A. Sayre tsid to s lady of the bast - tan (a partem) : 
"As yas ladies will nsc tlvesi. I rreammtmA C«s- 
rsnd'i Cream' si (be least bar-aid sf si the Skin 
prtsaralisat.'* , 

For tale by all Dnintsn and Fancy Coach Dealer*. 

GOLRALD'S ORIENTAL TOILET POWDER 

For infants and adults. Erqumtely perfaroecf rwres San- 

born and rerden an excellent complexion. Price 25 Cents, by Mail. 

GOLRALD'S POLDRE SL'BTILE 
Reno*** Superfluovt Hair Price SI. OO. by snail 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Pmp'r. 37 Great Jones St.. New Yon <_ 




S6 



San Francisco News Letter 



Jolt 3, 1909 



Beautiful 

Paraiso Hot Springs 

The Mecca for Automobili&s 



New Auto Boulevard from Soledad 
to the Springs. Roads in firsl-class 
condition from Oakland to Paraiso. 
Special Rates; care and attention 
paid to motor parties. New Garage. 
Supplies, gasolene, oils and repairs 
at city prices. 



Most wonderful natural hot mineral 
waters and baths on the Coasl. The 
only HOT SODA baths in California 
positively guaranteed to cure rheu- 
matism, gout, malaria, liver, kidney 
and stomach troubles. 



Mineral waters awarded firs! prize 
at St. Louis Exposition. Climate 
unexcelled. Rates $12.00 to $16.00. 
baths included. 



Train leaves 3rd and Townsend at 
8 a. m. connecting with AUTOMO- 
BILE at Soledad, arriving at Springs 
for lunch. 



Booklets at Peck's, 789 Market St.; Bryan's, 2004 Sutter St., 
San Francisco.or H.H. McGowan, Paraiso, Monterey Co.,Cal. 



Five Years of Perfection 



The Mitchell engine hasn't shown a fault in five 
years. We have tested it in every way possible. It 
is a wonder. This can all be proven. Does it help 
you to decide which car to buy? 

SEE THE "SHOW ME" MITCHELL 

4 cyl. 2o H. P. Runabout tlooo. 

4 cyl. 2o H. P. Four passenger Slooo. 

4 cyl. 3o H. P. Light Touring car, 5 passenger, 
convertible into Runabout Roadster or Surrey type, 
$15oo. 

4 cyl. 4o H. P. 7 passenger — a great big, fine car, 
$2ooo. 

You can't wear them out. 



Osen & Hunter Auto Co. 

511 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 
Cor. First and St James, San Jose 1224 Webster St., Oakland 



Los Angeles is making big preparations for the road race to 
be held on July 10th. This promises to be one of the really 
big events of the year. The proposition is to make this one of 
the big annual events in motordom, and Los Angeles will make 
it one of the additional yearly features to draw attention to the 
Angel City. 

From our correspondent, under date of June 26th, one-half of 
the grand stand was then completed, and the turns were well up 
the banks. The course generally is receiving a thorough going 
over. The seating capacity is immense, and goes to show that 
the local management is looking forward to an immense throng. 

There is to be in the neighborhood of ninety boxes, and seats 
for the same are even now selling at from $3 to $5 each. 

Every day new racing cars are arriving and the town is full 
of drivers who have come for the races. 

The list of entries include such cars as the Apperson Jackrab- 
bit, the Pope Hartford, the six-cylinder Franklin, the Stude- 
baker, the Lozier, the Stearns and the Stoddard-Dayton. Owing 
to the rules of the race, the best of the racing drivers now on the 
coast will not be allowed to drive. Only drivers residing in this 
State are eligible to take part in the race. Frank Free, the well- 
known operator of the Comet machine, has been engaged to han- 
dle a Stearns, and has already established a camp on the course. 
With Free is C. A. Warren, local manager of the Stearns Com- 
pany; Jack Snead, Charles Soules and two expert" mechanics 
from the Cleveland factory. 

As the course is only eight miles long, the racers will have to 
make twenty-five laps, and, according to some of the men who are 
going to take part in the race, the event will be the most dan- 
gerous of any of the recent road races. The danger to the racers 
will be increased by the number of inexperienced drivers in the 
race. As each ear will have very little headway, the drivers who 
try to set too fast a pace from the start will have all they can 
do to keep clear of some of the other contestants, especially on the 
turns, of which there are two or three sharp ones. 

* * * 

Ford Wins. 

The little Ford won the New York to Seattle race, but the 

particulars were received too late last week for insertion in the 

News Letter. It is with pleasure that the recording of the feat 

of the Ford car is made, as it is without precedent in the history 

, of motor cars in this or any other country. The trial was one 

of the most severe that has ever 1 n faced by a car of any size 

and of any make, and that the Ford won out is a great testi- 
monial as to its superior mechanism and substantial build. 

'I lie story of the long journey of the Ford No. 2 over the good, 
bad. passable and miserable roads of the country to its destina- 
tion on Puget Sound would make a splendid magazine story of 
thrilling interest. 

The trophy cup and $2,000 goes to the Ford car, and the Ford 
owners everywhere are crowing over the result. The Shawm tit 
won the second prize of $1500. For all the cars engaged it was 
a hard contest, and as the miles and miles of road were reeled 
away the qualities, in speed and wear, of the ears came to the fore 
and finally the Ford won. 



The information is given by Mr. Madden, of Dixon, that 
the roads from Vallejo to Yolo County are best by way of 
American Canyon to Woodland and other places in that vicinity 
by the road coming through Cordelia, then to Fairfield, from 
which place they may pass directly through Elmira, thence into 
Dixon, and then directly north to Woodland. 

A letter has been received at the home office from A. C. 
Wlieclock, manager of the Fresno branch of the Pioneer Auto- 
mobile Company, in which he says that the large sixty horse- 
power cars delivered in that district this season have convinced 
the public of the fact that high-powered cars are desirable for 
sandy districts. He speaks especially of the cars of George C. 
Roeding, C. H. Geer and W. C. Dallas, and also states that when 
on a trip to the Coalinga District a few days since, he met 
Charles Dumphy, of the Tri-County Oil Company, who arrived 
there a few weeks ago with his sixty horsepower Thomas Flyer, 
and who. reports that the car is doing great work. 

* * * 

On Monday the big motor-cycle races will occur at the Emery- 
ville track. There is sure to be a very heavy attendance. The 
committees are very efficient, and they have been doing com- 
prehensive and telling work. 



J i i.y 3. 1909 



and California Advertiser 



27 



•'The automobile 1ms become one of the essentials of man's 
pleasures ami activities," declares the big man of the rubber 
trade. "The manufacturers of the country have confidence in 
tlie permanency of the demand, and they are making prepara- 
tions accordingly. During the season of 1910 there will be per- 
haps 200,000 automobiles made, and I suppose that they will all 
In- disposed of. When T was in the East, material for that num- 
ber had already been purchased, and the factories were busily 
engaged on the cars. In one place I saw 30,000 sets of axles 
for a well-known make of ear for 1910. What the figures may 
grow to as time advances it is difficult to predict." 

Good roads are Mr. Dunn's hobby. Speaking of them, he said : 

''If the farmer, the merchant and every one that follows a 
commercial pursuit would only give the good roads question 
serious thought and study, the results of those communities 
where the roads have been made 'good' and see how they have 
been a saving that makes them a high paying interest investment, 
all the talk and schemes to get good roads would be unnecessary. 
I see it and know of what I am speaking, for our agencies con- 
stantly keep me in touch with the question." 

lie volunteers, the statement that California is getting a big 
advertisement out of the State bonding issue of $18,000,000 to 
build highways. "That has caused talk all over the East, and it's 
in line with the usual notions entertained there of the California 
grit." 

* * * 

The auto road up to the summit of Mount Shasta is in rapid 
progress, and will shortly be opened as one of the big features of 
tlir Xorthern tour. The mountain is 1-1,444 feet above sea level, 
ami in the land of eternal snows. Its hoary head is visible for 
a radius of 200 miles, and from its summit a magnificent pano- 
rama is afforded. The road is under construction by the Mount 
Shasta Automobile Ascension Company, which was incorporated 
on the 20th of April in the present year. Its officers include the 
following: J. M. Schuler, president: W. B. Hunt, vice-president: 
Henry Mi-Guinness, secretary and treasurer, who are all resi- 
dents of Sissons. 

The road will be a toll road, and a moderate fee « ill I" 1 charged 
those using it. The grade is moderate ami twenty miles an 
hour can easily be made with a good machine. The di 
from Sissons to the snow line over the company's road is about 
fifteen miles. 

* * * 

Mr. C. E. Mathewson, of the Diamond Rubber Company, who 
is for personal ami business reasons rerj much interested in the 
good roads movement, toured to Del Monte to attend th 

M'nlion. 



ONCE MORE 

G&JllRfcS 

WIN 



The continued evidence of their superiority, 
brought out from day to day, must bring home to you 
the fa<5t that they are absolutely the best tires the 
market offers. 

Put our 1909 product on your car, and tire 
trouble, for you, is past history. 



w 



414-416 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Market 1095. 



Never anyone, anywhere will make 
a better one" 



Durocar 

Durocar Automobile Company 

of San Francisco 



489 Golden Gate Avenue 




SWEEPSTAKES 



Moore 
Motor 
Supply 
Company 



Distributors for 
Monogram Oil 



v\N NESS AND GOLDEN 
GATE AV'ENX'ES. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

OAKLAND 
LOS ANGELES 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 3. 1909 




THE MICHELIN BIBENDUM TWINS. 

Prize Winners in New York Automobile Carnival Parade on 
Monday of last Week. 

The Bibcndum Twins, rollicking rubber comedians from 
Southern Fiance, the heroes of the 1908 Carnival of Nice, arriv- 
ing in America recently from a tour of the European automobile 
shows, struck New York on Monday of last week and made a 
decided hit on Broadway, winning the lirst prize of $500 in 
the commercial division of the Annual Automobile Carnival of 
the New York Automobile Trade Association. 

These rubber giants Erom Clermont-Ferrand, France, were 
seated comfortably on a large float entered by the Michelin Tire 
Company, which was suitably decorated with flags and b 
and many shields, each carrying the name of some proud Biben- 
dum victory. This unique exhibit added greatly to the gen iral 
carnival spirit. 

The Bibendums were built up apparently from tires. Each 
figure carried a giant cigar. By most ingenious pneumatic oper i- 
tion their faces at one time reflected the utmost happiness and 
tranquility, and again they would assume every appearam 
melancholia and distress. 

The Bibendums, absolutely motionless at limes, would rise 
suddenly to full height, throwing up their arms, and with bodies 
swaying and heads bent back, their faces would brighten up as if 
they knew in advance that the coveted first prize was to be their 
award at the end of the parade. The street urchins were quick 
to "catch on," and they went rolling and laughing along Broad- 
way in imitation of the antics of the Twins, much to the amuse- 
ment of the older and more dignified, who enjoyed the day, 
however, no less than the children of younger growth. 

There is an elaborate and interesting story connected with 
the history of the Bibendum Twins. As the tale is told in 
France, these mighty curios were reared in Africa, the unusual 
offspring of a sturdy ostrich. Without injury to themselves thev 
soon learned to devour or drink' anything and everything: hence 



the name Bibendum. Broken glass, old borse-shoes, nails, m it- 

als of all kinds, and am obile trophies wherever offered are 

their regular diet, but, as the story goes, nothing satisfies their 
omnivorous appetites. Serious, grotesque, strong, weak, im- 
perious, yielding. 9evere, comic, all in turn, the prize-winning 
Bibendum Twins were without much doubt the mosl curious and 
most talked of travelers in all Xew York. 



Thoose Your Oil As 
You Would Your Car 

Imperfect lubrication causes more 
trouble, more expense, more break- 
downs than anything else about your 
car. There'll be no carbon deposit 
to foul the cylinders and spark-plugs, 
no friction, no oil-troubles if you get 

IEROIEHE 

Auto-Lubricating Oil 

You can count on perfect lubrication at 
all times, under all conditions, entire free- 
dom from trouble with carbon deposits, 
and increased power from your engine. 

Zerolene is made in one grade only, for all types of 
cylinders and bearings. Produced in only one place 
in the world. Put up in sealed cans with patent 
spout that cannot be refilled. Also in barrels for 
garage trade. Sold by dealers everywhere. Write 
for booklet, "21,000 Miles with Zerolene," Free. 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY 

(Incorporated) 



July 3, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



211 



See That Seal 
Is Not Broken 





Have You Been Getting PANHARD? 

"The Oil in the Checker-Board Can" 

There is no longer room for doubt. The New Sealed 
Can insures the purchaser against substitution of 
inferior grades. 

PANHARD OIL Will Save 1-2 Your Repair Bills 

It does not carbonize and does lubricate 

Let us recommend the grade suited to your engine. 

L. H. & B. I. BILL, Coast Distributers 
132 Valencia Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Morgan sWrightmres 
are good tires 



Good for the motorist who 

finds it necessary to cut 

down his car maintenance 

expense. 



WEINSTOCK NICHOLS CO. 

Northern California and Nevada Distributors 
669 Golden Gate Ave.. San Francisco Phone Market 6000 



AUTO LIVERY 
COMPANY 

Agents for the famous 

APPERSON CARS 



Salesrooms and Garage: N.W. corner 
Van Ness and Golden Gate Avenues. 
The finest livery service in the Wesr. 



Ring up FRANKLIN 1535 



Bargains in second hand cars of various makes 



BUICK 



1 < 



WHITE STREAK" 



"THE RUNABOUT THAT'S TALKED ABOUT." ASK ANYBODY. 
$1160 F. O. B. San Francisco 

BUICK "40" 

DO YOU KNOW — 

The Bulck "40" holds the worlds track record for 100 miles. 

The Bulck "40" holds the world's stock car 100 mile straight 
away record. 

The Bulck "40" won the COBE Trophy, distance 395. 6t> miles, 
defeating imported and American cars of highest power and price. 

$1900 F. O. B. San Francisco 

Immediate Deliveries 

Howard Automobile Company 



523 Golden Gate Avenue 



Telephone Market 1536 



San Francisco 



30 



San Francisco, News Letter 



July 3, 1909 



Si Perl-ins' Corner, June 22, 1909. 
Editor San Francisco News Letter. 

Dear Sir — When I last wrote you, I had in mind that you 
wud kinder give us another chance, and come over with them auto 
guys what calls themselves the '"'San Francisco Motor Club." 
Soakum County was redy to greet the whole bunch. Spaghetti 
Ded Eotti went over to 'Frisco and bought a wagon load of 
carpet tacks and turned the job to put them on all of our roads 
(such as they are) to Orlisnose and Don Carlos Peacherino, and 
they gets their gang together, and in the ded of night they scat- 
tered them tacks from Skinem to the border lines of Soakum 
County on all of our roads (such as they arc.) 

Well, what do you think turned loose? It was grate. That 
lawyer guy who seems to be sleeping with one eye open and hold- 
ing one ear to a wireless telephone, got wind of old Ded Kuril's 
game, and he sends three guys with swell rags on, and cobble 
stone diamond studs in their shirt fronts, over with a big roll 
of green backs, to buy all of old Ded Botti's and Peacherino's 
sheep, to be delivered on Saturday morning at Houghsalito. 
Old Ded Eotti and Percherino, as you know, are big sheep 
breeders, and they kinder thought they had Miller & Lux skinned, 
that their sheep was the last of the season, so they asks $10 per 
head, and them buyer guys says we must have them sheep there, 
on time Saturday morning, as sound as a dollar, and able to 
walk. Old Ded and Carlos sees them big bank rolls and kinder 
has a fit of "forgetamania." and gives orders for their men to 
be redy to start at 3 a. m. Saturday morning. Then them buyer 
guys says they will be at the ferry to get the sheep at 9 a. m., 
and they goes over the other roads and buys all the sheep on 
the same terms — deliver your sheep and we will pay you $10 a 
head, says they. Well, the gang which Ortisnosi controls scat- 
tered the tacks on the roads (such as they are) Friday night at 
12 p. m., as thick as they cud, for about nigh onto five miles on 
each side of Soakum Township, and when them sheep (whew! it 
makes me shudder to think about it), were drove -over that there 
road (such as it was), they each one just picked up them there 
tacks until there was not a single, solitary tack left; then them 
sheep just laid down and wud not budge another step; every 
sheep just had a coat of mail on the bottom of their feet, and 
when old Ded Eotti and Don Carlos comes along with their 
mouths a-waterin' about gettin' $10 a head for their old sheep 
(what wasn't worth more than $3), and sees them sheep a-layin' 
on their backs and cryin' like babies do when they are in need of 
a dose of catnip tea and a box of Menen's powder; just at this 
critical minit up comes an officer from the Society for the Pre- 
vention of Cruelty to Animals and arrests old Ded and Carlos 
and all their men, and charged them with shooing sheep with 
carpet tacks, and takes them before the Judge, and as each sheep 
was shooed, it was a seperit offense. Well, there wus 4,000 sheep, 
and the bail was $5 in each case, and old Ded and Carlos was up 
aginst the real posy this time sure, so they wus a parlyin' with 
the Judge until it wus about 2 o'clock, when up comes them 
buyer guys and says to old Ded and Carlos the bargain is off, be- 
cause you failed to deliver them sheep on time, and time was 
the essence of our contract. 

Then while old Ded wus down on his marrow-bones a-beggin' 
the Judge to let him go on his own recog., i. e., on his face alon°- 



comes that big lawyer guy from the S. F. M. C, an' he says: 
"Judge, I have come over to send this old Dago to jail fer the 
rest of his natural life. Any man who scatters tacks on a public 
road for the purpose of puncterin' the tires of sheep and the like 
is not fit to live any longer. I am the attorney for the Society 
for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, specially employed to 
prosecute this case," and he'd no more'n got thru tellin' the 
Judge, when old Ded throws up his hands and says : "I certainly 
am in hell ever since I entered in this graftin' Supervisor busi- 
ness. So I will confess all my crimes if that lawyer will get me 
the same kind of 'munity he got from Spreck. for them guys 
in 'Frisco; and that lawyer sed he wus in the prosecutin' end of 
this game now, and he had no more 'munity contracts; that old 
Ded wud have to take his medicine like any other grafter ought 
to do. This wus too much for poor old Ded, so he fainted in the 
arms of his graftin' pals. The doctor has just been sent for. 
Old Ded Eotti may be dead. He lies very still now. 

Yours, 

Jim Squeezbm, J. P. 




If you would consider ex- 
treme comfort and silence 
in your car you should 
consider the Peerless for 
1910 :: :: :: :: :: 



H.O.HARRISON CO. 



RENAULT "The Car" Guaranteed For Life 




50-60 H-P. 6-Cylindcr Chassis $7500 
35-45 H.P. 4-Cylinder Chassis J6000 
20-30 H-P. 4-Cylinder Chassis $5000 
14-20 H.P. 4-Cylinder Chassis $4000 



12-16 IIP. 4-Cylindcr Chassis $3250 
10-14 H-P. 4-Cylinder Chassis $3000 
9-12 H-P. 2-Cylinder Chassis $2000 
8-10 H-P. Voiluretle. completely 
equipped - - $1750 

RUNABOUTS, TOURING CARS, LIMOUSINES, LANDAULETS 

THE MOST COMPLETE LINE EVER HANDLED BY ANY 
MANUFACTURER. ALL CHASSIS SPECIALLY BUILT FOR 
AMERICAN ROADS. 



RENAULT "30" Special Wilh Toy Tonneau. $5750. 

RENAULT FRERES SELLING BRANCH INC. 

316-322 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Cal. Telephone, Market 7038 



July 3, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



31 



Glidden Tour News (Official.) 

A new ruling concerning the Glidden tour contests has just 
been made which will be highly pleasing to the manufacturers 
who enter cars and to the people of the country traveled through. 
The decision has been made to have the names of the cars, as well 
as their numbers, on the signs they carry. Hitherto the signs on 
the cars had only the words "A. A. A. Tour," and the year and 
entry number of the car. This has been aggravating to spectators 
as well as disappointing to the entrants. All along the route of 
the tour some of the residents are to be seen with clippings from 
newspapers that give the numbers and names of the cars, but 
from those not thus provided there is a continued cry of : "What 
car is that?" The fact that the make of car is the first point of 
interest has been deeply impressed by experience upon Chairman 
Hower, of the A. A. A. Contest Board, and therefore the signs 
this year will be twice as large as previously, and the names of 
the cars will be conspicuous on them. 

There is not, and never has been, any intention of shortening 
the resting periods of the tour, or of curtailing the stay at Minne- 
apolis or Denver. Two days positively will be spent in each city, 
and the contestants will be given full opportunity to enjoy the 
hospitality of the automobilists of those places, who have made 
elaborate preparations to entertain. The route between Minne- 
apolis and Omaha has not as yet been officially determined, but 
it will be a three day journey between those cities instead of two 
as originally planned, and the arrival at Omaha, Denver and 
Kansas City will be consequently one day later than at first 
scheduled. This will make the days spent in Denver Sunday and 
Monday, instead of Saturday and Sunday, but in some ways this 
is preferable. 

* * * 

Autoists contemplating motoring from here to the northern 
part of the State, and more particularly to Yreka and vicinity, 
are given some valuable information regarding the road condi- 
tions en route to that point and some good advice regarding the 
best route to be followed by Charles W. Avery of Yreka, who 
for the past several months has done considerable touring in the 
northern counties in his Studebaker car. 

"The best road is through the tunnel from Oakland, which 
leads into Contra Costa County, to Stockton, and then up to Red 
Bluff. Cross the river at Red Blutf, in which place you will find 
several miles of newly oiled roads, the result of an experiment on 
the part of one of the Supervisors of that district who is a stanch 
supporter of the good roads movement. On leaving lied Blutf 
take the road out through Burney Valley and on to Cayton." 



Ivan L de Jongh 



High grade automobile repairing. 
Holley high-tension magnetos. 
Stewart and Holley Carburetors installed. 
Storage Battery charging. 



446 FULTON STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Annette Kellerman, who was queen of the automobile carnival 
in New York, performs high dives and is professionally known 
as the "Diving Venus," but an unusually "intelligent compositor" 
bulled so as to cause one editor to refer to her as the "Driving 
Venus." It spoiled the point the editor sought to make, but ft 
was quite appropriate to the occasion, and seemed to justify the 
intelligence at the case, or keyboard, that declined to follow copy. 
Besides Venus is Venus however engaged. 

* * * 

During the first four months of 1909, New Jersey, which is 
adjacent to several of the States in the union, has derived a 
revenue of more than $100,000 through taxing and fining auto- 
mobilists. The New Jersey constables are getting it down so fine 
that they lurk about the ferries and along the State boundary line 
to catch any unwary person from the United States who lets so 
much as one wheel of a motor car get. upon New Jersey soil with- 
out having previously obtained a license. 



^^c^e\° 



A letter received by Osen & Hunter, local agents for the Mit- 
chell cars, from Vernon (I. Rogers, secretary of the M 
Motor Car Company, at limine. Wisconsin, announces thai he 
Iri'i yesterday for the coast. The purpose of this trip is to 
plete arrangements for the annual Mitchell Jubilee, which takes 
place in San Jose, July 10th. On the two previous occasions 
of the annual re-union, Rogers acted as representative of the 
company, and the success of the first and second jubilees prove 
Roger's ability in the entertainment line. Rogt 
will bring something of a novelty line tor the jubilee, and thai 
when he reaches San Francisco, will announce the offi 
take charge of the Hill Climb at Alum Rock, and also il> 

iiiittees to have the management of the event. 

* * * 
While there may be temp 

manufacturers and the Automobile Club of America, because "I 
the race across the continent, sanctioned by the club 
international contest, it is probable that this one misunde 
ing will do more than anvth o effect a better understand- 

ing in the future. It was hardly to he expected that the club 
would stultify itself 1« Miction once granted, but it 

seems likely that the A. A. \. Board of contest »ill have a smooth 

i I hereafter in the control of all events except those wh 

genuinely international, 

* » * 

Of all the queer contests that have I, one thai 

to win i tor fame was pulled off the other day in 

5 an "ear contest," and the object was to tind how many 
Mtrs the competitors could by the sound of th 

hausis, the machines being out of sight of the emta: 
mechanic named (iros succeeded in naming eight of the ! 
d, and was awarded a gold medal. 



M-rtpl Forty Four M H P. (2400 

Spare wheel, with Inflated 

Magneto, - 

What Car Can Claim as Much ? 

We make all our own castings, drop 
ings, gears, frames, nut- ml bolts. We make 

all our radiators, glass fronts and tops. We sell ALL 
duplii Money thau our competitors. We 

have not the only good ear, £»/. not buy a 

rOO CANNOT BUY AS <,<)Ul> A CAR. 

unless you pay at least $1500 more money. Come and see the 
RAMBLES i ll S.SS - on of the ■ 

— the finest piece of automobile workman 
hibited. You will have a better idea of how Uambler 
cars are built. 

Thomas B. Jeffery & Company 

Valencia Si. San PTanclsco. uai. 
Firtoo — Kei»o»ka. Wi». 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 3. 1909 



The Peer of All! 

DEMAND 

PLANET AUT X BILE 

TAKE NO SUBSTITUTE 

Bass-Hueter Co. 

816 Mission Street Distributors 

Adapted to Every Machine 

"Fridtion Costs More Than Lubrication" 



ARRIVED 



1910 



1910 



The Autocar 

4 cyl. 30 H. P. Type XX Light Touring 
Car, 11900, £ o. b. San Francisco 



Bosch Double Ignition System. Come in and see the 
first of the new season's models. 

Walter C. Morris, 

TeL Franklin 3777. 640 VAN NESS AVE- 





REO 


0t 


0&&arb~!agi0n 




J. W. LEAVITT & CO.. 


Golden Gate Ave., cor. Hyde St. Phone Market 411 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF REPAIRING AUTO 
LAMPS, RADIATORS AND FENDERS AT SHORT 
NOTICE. Phone Market 751 




METAL SPINNING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 



T A X I C A B S 

(Genuine RENAULT Cars) 
PACIFIC TAXIMETER CAB COMPANY 

Solicits your patronage of its equipment of imported 
Renault Taxicabs and will show its appreciation by 
prompt and reliable service. * * * * 

TELEPHONE 

FRANKLIN 4848 

Private Exchange connecting all Departments 

MAIN STATION AND GENERAL OFFICES, 1355-63 BUSH STREET 

FAY C. BEAL. General Manager. 



A PLEA FOR AUTOMOBILE SANITY. 

By Chakles Clifton, 

President Association of Licensed Automobile Manufacturers. 

Automobile owners, as a rule, in discussing their costs, gen- 
erally name the great item of expense as being tires, and in that 
connection they are quite inclined to arraign the makers of 
pneumatic tires as being responsible for this condition. These 
statements are an individual expression of opinion based on more 
or less experience, and doubtless justified in part by the records 
of bills paid. 

These remarks in the same sense are an individual expression 
of opinion based upon the same facts, and are contributed in the 
hope that they may suggest a way of reducing the sum total of 
tire bills, as well as leading in the direction of safer and saner 
methods in driving and, in the last analysis, greater pleasure 
from motor cars. 

There are three prime factors responsible for short tire life. 
First, excessive speed, especially during the warm months. Sec- 
ond, changes of direction at a high rate of speed; and third, ex- 
cessive and unnecessary use of mechanical brakes. My ex- 
perience has gone to prove that — punctures excepted — the life of 
tires is enormously prolonged by avoiding the above three car- 
dinal enemies of the pneumatic tire. 

So much for the direct money cost, but if these three cardinal 
principles are insisted upon by owners, the liability of accident 
will be reduced to a minimum, and all the high costs incident to 
property and personal damage. Accidents will also be reduced, 
as well as wear and tear mentally, on an owner in connection 
therewith. In other words, sanity in the use of the motor car is 
an incalculable money value which no owner should ignore; 
and the reverse of the proposition is an unnecessary extravagance, 
which, if indulged in, should not carry with it an invective 
against the tire manufacturer or the manufacturer of the motor 
ear. In other words, the responsibility for high costs in running 
expenses is absolutely in the hands of the owner, or perhaps more 
directly in the hands of the driver. Excessive speed under all 
conditions is done at high cost, which can only be reduced by the 
adoption of sane methods. 

To go a step further in this line of reasoning, I wish to plead 
for saneness in the use of highways. Not only in the matter of 
excessive speed, but also in the relation which should subsist be- 
tween those who ride in cars and those who use it in other and 
older ways. The antagonism of the farmer against the auto- 
mobile is mainly the result of a series of circumstances which 
to "the other fellow" seems like a succession of outrages. It is 
well for the driver of a motor car to realize that the other fellow 
used the highway, more or less unmolested, ever since there were 
highways. That while he may feel he has pre-emption, that pre- 
emption goes no further than the joint use. For the drivel of 
a motor ear to assume to use more than his share of the road to 
make of bis vehicle a menace, or at the very least a nuisance to 
other users, is a very natural cause for antagonism. The users 
and drivers of motor cars can, by sane driving, do the larger part 
in accomplishing a reversal of this sentiment, and in any event 
only fair play will eliminate the present friction. 

* * * 

Whether because of the changed rules, and the fact of there 
being three individual trophies to be won, or because of the new 
Western territory to be covered, the interest in the Glidden tour 
contest is unmistakably keener this year than formerly. Posi- 
tive evidence of this is found in the fact of Chairman Hower 
having now in hand more than a score of paid-up entries, with 
enough more unequivocally pledged to make the contest a suc- 
cess. Usually the entries do not come in until the last few days, 
and never before have there been even half so many assured two 
months before the start of the tour. The interest is well distrib- 
uted among the makers of various grades of cars, too, probably 
because the route and the new rules will together afford a better 
opportunity than ever for the different cars to make notable per- 
formances. 

* * * 

Among the owners of Buick "White Streaks" who arc con- 
stantly touring over the State, Dr. H. 1. Wiel, of San Francisco 
is setting a hot pace. He seems to have acquired the Del Monte 
habit, and for seven consecutive Saturdays he has made the run 
down to the Monterey Bay resort, returning each Sunday via 
Santa Cruz. Dr. Wiel has made one trip to Tahoe in his little 
''White Streak," and will soon leave for that point mi his second 
trip. 



July 3, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



33 



According to a letter received by A. E. Hunter, of the firm of 
i Isen & Ikinter, from Vernon G. Sogers, secretary of the Mitchell 
Motor Car Company, of Kacine, Wisconsin, the coming Mitchell 
Jubilee will be the most successful ever held. Prom the pre- 
parations being made, and the prizes to be awarded, the hill 
climb in this Third Animal Mitchell Jubilee will be most inter- 
esting. The run will be made to San Jose on the morning of 
duly 10th, and about two o'clock in the afternoon, after every one 
has become well acquainted, and the "Mitchell family" reunited, 
the hill-climb will take place on the Alum Rock course. Rogers 
writes that the course will be guarded by mounted police, and 
that arrangements have been made to have an electric timing ap- 
paratus, to insure accuracy in judging the contest. It is nol 
necessary to have entry blanks, but it is only necessary to be the 
owner of a Mitchell car and line up at the bottom of the hill. 
Rogers writes: "We are especially anxious to get as many lady 
entrants as possible, and make an especial feature of that part of 
the contest." Following is a list, of the classes and the prizes to 
he given : Ladies' class, any model, first prize — silver cup ; second, 
ladies' traveling bag full-equipped; third, dash clock. Model "40" 
class, first, silver cup; second, luncheon outfit. Model "30" 
class, first, silver cup ; second, two-quart Thermo bottles in leather 
case ; Model "20" class, first, silver cup ; second, two pint Thermo 
bottles in leather case. Touring car class, old models, first, tire ; 
second, electric horn ; third, tool kit. Runabouts and roadsters, 
old models, first, tire; second, tool kit; third, horn. Professional 
class, which is open to agents, dealers, chauffeurs or drivers of 
Mitchell cars, first prize, $50; second, $20; and third, $10. 
Ladies will be eligible for those prizes only in their class. 

In the evening there will be a big banquet, at which it is ex- 
pected a number of vaudeville artists will entertain the guests of 
the Mitchell Company. 

* * * 

Mr. C. S. Howard, head of the Howard Automobile Company, 
distributors of the Buick automobiles for the State of California, 
who is at the Buick factory for the fourth time this season, writes 
that he has succeeded in still further increasing his allotment of 
Buieks by 250 cars, that the shipments to the Howard Automobile 
Company for the past week were 43 cars, and that the shipments 
for the next week would equal or exceed this number. The daily 
output and shipments from the Buick factory at the present time 
are from 100 to 125 automobiles, certainly a stupendous pro- 
duction, and by far the greatest the world lias ever known. 

"It is impossible for one to realize without actually seeing it 
for himself what a gigantic institution the Buick factory really 
is," writes Mr. Howard. "Of all my visits, 1 myself have never 
until the present one, during the busy season, appreciated the 
meaning of the production from one factory, of one hundred 
automobiles per day, nor the enormity of this, the greatest 

similar enterprises." 

* * * 

With considerably over one thousand of its six-cylinder ears 
in successful operation on the road, and the demand for them 
greater during the past season than the immense new factory 
could supply, the Pierce-ArrOW Motor Oar Company has an- 
nounced thai for fin- coming season it will manufacture nothing 
Init six-cylinder cars. 

A number of considerations have been responsible for this de- 
rision, the first of these being the unqualified success that has 
attended the use of the cars under all conditions to travel bj 
owners. Another is that the indications for the coming 
are. that the demand for BU-cylindei cars of this make will be 
80 real as to engage the entire work of the factory to the exclu- 
sion of other types. 

* * * 

Tony Nichols, of W'einstoek-Xiehols Co.. believes that he has 
in the Morgan & Wright special a lire which will reduce lire ex- 
pense to a minimum. The first allotment of these special tires 
arrived two weeks ago. and are in service on five of the b - 
cylinder Thomas cars in the rent, where they will receive the 
most severe usage. The boys driving rent cars in the city are 
watching the results obtained from these special tires with much 

interest, as tire upkeep is their greatest item of expense. 

* « * 

The Seattle branch of the Diamond Rubber Company h 
wired Mr. Mathewson that the Shawmut ear which jusl 
pleted the New York-Seattle race, finished in that city with the 
original air in two of the tires. This is considered -a remarkable 
performance, in view of the surface conditions the car had I 
tend with in crossing the continent. 



1910 Models 
Stevens-Duryea 




Model Y, Six Cylinder. Forty H. P. 



Over four years' 
consistent six- 
cylinder successes 



Pacific Motor Car Company 

1310 Franklin St., Oakland 380 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Manufactured by Stevens-Duryea Co., Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

Members Association Licensed Automobile Manufacturers 



Chalmers-Detroit "30" 



The beginning and the end car. 

In the beginning the initial price is slightly 
higher, in the end the upkeep and after expense is 
much less. 

ANYBODY CAN CUT PRICES BUT IT TAKES 
BRAINS TO MAKE A BETTER ARTICLE." 

(Elbert Hubbard.) 

Buying a good car is only one Step in the right 
direction. 

BUT 

Buying a good car from the most reliable dealers 
on the Pacific Coast is your absolute assurance of 

satisfaction. 

The Pioneer Automobile Company is the largest 
concern west of Chicago giving its undivided at- 
tention to the sale of automobiles. Ten years in 
business assures our stability and perpetuates our 
guarantees. Our business motto is "Right or 
Made Right." 



The PIONEER AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 



Oakland 



901 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
San Francisco 



Fresno 



34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 3, 1909 



Representative Garages of San Francisco. 



Washington and East Streets 



Phone Kearny 678 



Ferry Garage Company 

All Workmanship Guaranteed 



Storage Renting 



Supplies Machinist 



MOTOR CML SERVICE CO. " The fiB?fl *■* c -'- r 



J. W. PEARSON, General Manager 
Market and Vaa Ness 



Station in the World." 

Phone Market 1705 



Auto Livery Co. 

M. L. Rosenfeld, Mgr. 
Van Ness and Golden Gate. Phone Franklin 1535 



The Renstrom Garage 



424 to 446 Stanyan Street. 



Tel. Park 476 



Golden Gate School of 
Automobile Engineering 



419-425 Larkin Street 
Phone Franklin 3391 



A. GILCREST 



Automobile 
Clearing House 



San Francisco, Cal 




Thomas B. Jeffery & Company, 117-126 Valencia St., San Franciaco 



ASK ABOUT 




A J A X T 


I R. £ 


INSURANCE 




AJAX-GRIEB RUBBER 


COMPANY 


N. Ea& Corner 57th Street and Broadway, New York. 


Factories, Trenton, N. J. 


Branches in all large cities 





CAL. 



AUTO TOP 



CO. 



SEAT COVERS, DUST HOODS, ETC. 
309 GOLDEN GATE AVE. E. H. MORGAN. Mgr. 



Your Wisest Move 

will be to equip your car with a 

Splitdorf Magneto 

the Magneto that gave such perfect ignition all through the 
severest test ever known— the recent 10,000 mile Non-Stop Run 
of the Maxwell car. 

Ask for Magneto catalog. 

C. F. SPLITDORF 

Pacific Coast Branch 
520 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 



Mr. Walter C. Morris, who is the efficient and popular agent 
for the Autocar and the Hall Auto Repair Company, have been 
exceedingly fortunate in securing the lease of the premises at 
519-521-523 Golden Gate avenue for the salesrooms and repair 
shops. 

The building is to be modern in every respect, and this is one 
of the very best locations in San Francisco. The building is to 
be modern in every particular, and will be completed and ready 
for occupancy about September 1st. 

The Hall Auto Repair Company will occupy the rear of this 
building — the ground floor on Locust avenue. The company 
will install the very latest repair and construction machinery. 
This company builds the Comet, the famous car that has made 
such a name in all the races in the West for the past two years. 

The building will be re-inforced concrete throughout and 
absolutely fire-proof. This will be one of the latest and most 
up-to-date buildings for auto purposes in the West. 

* * * 

Mr. E. W. Hallowell, of Susanville, sends in the following 
valuable road information to the Studebaker agency: 

"Reno to Susanville, a distance of 90 miles, is all over good 
roads, that is via Milford and .Tanesville, at which places gaso- 
line is usually obtainable. The road is marked with very few 
grades except the first five miles out of Reno, which likewise 
has a few sandy spots. Plumas Junction is also a stopping place. 
25 miles from Reno. Milford is 65 miles and Janesville 80 miles. 
From Susanville to Greenville is a route sometimes taken, as it 
furnishes a short cut, but the road is not open. The grade is 
exceptionally heavy, and poor for automobiles, as there are no 
stopping places en route. From Susanville to Prattville, Taylor- 
ville. Crescent Mills and Quincy. by way of Mountain Meadows 
and Big Meadows, the road will be in good shape in about 30 
davs. Tt is never open during the winter months, but during the 
other seasons of the year provides a beautiful trip through the 
famous fishing grounds of Big Meidows, Clear Creek and Moun- 
tain Meadows. All of these places are excellent stopping points 
and gasoline may be had at any of them." 

* * * 

The performance of Fisk tires in the Western stock chassis 
race at Chicago was one of the most notable ever seen in an 
automobile speed contest. Bourque, who drove the Knox into 
second place, losing the race by ft very small margin, carried 
Fisk removable rims and bolted-on tires, and had no tire trou- 
ble. The big Knox went through the 396 mile grind on one set 
of front tires, and changed rear tires on the twelfth lap only as 
a matter of precaution, for the rear shoes were in good condition 
even at this stage of the contest. These were the only tires he 
used throughout the race, and in view of the badly cut up con- 
dition of the course, on account of the small car race of the day 
previous, it is remarkable to think that rubber and fabric will 
stand the strain of such a long race. Bourque also made the 
fastest lap over the 23.27 mile course, when he covered it in 
32 minutes 34 seconds. Dennison, in another Knox, averaged 
89.2 miles an hour over a specially measured mile, timed by an 

electric timing device. 

* * * 

The Diamond Rubber Company of Akron. Ohio, has just sent 
its Pacific Coast branch a detailed statement of the tire show- 
ing at twenty-two automobile shows held in the United States 
this year. It is interesting to note that there were 2739 sets of 
tires shown and 20 different makes represented. The average 
if all tires had equal representation would be 137. The Diamond 
Rubber Company, however, had a very big lead, there being 
701VJ sets used in the various shows. 

* * * 

Captain W. B. Burtt, 20th Infantry, TJ. S. A., before sailing 
for Manila on the army transport Logan, took delivery from the 
Howard Automobile Company of a Buick "White Streak,' - which 
he is taking with him for service in the Philippine Islands. 



Hi 



e rm 01 



3 



Hughson An d Merton 



WILL NOT BURN— LASTS INDEFINITELY 
FACTORY 
REPRESENTATIVES 



Brake 
Lining 



438 Market Street 
San Francisco 



July 3, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



35 



HOLA.i HOLA! OYEZ! 07EZ. 

Give heed, in other words, you of the Blue Blond of San Fran- 
cisco. It has been decreed and the law set and laid down that 
a bodyguard Eor "Gaspar de Portola" on his entrance to the city 
shall consist of 106 of the youi>2 representative men of San 
Francisco, who shall be a King's bodyguard during his stay. 

Their uniform shall he as the time of "Our First Governor," 
consisting of the heavy gold brocaded coats, white breeches and 
top boots, and their mounts will be black chargers. This will 
carry out the idea of the olden times, and also of the present time 
when in every royal country the king and emperor has his body- 
guard, being a special body of young men chosen from the aris- 
tocracy. 

It may be of interest to know that in certain countries only 
certain of the nobility can become king or emperor's bodyguard. 
In Scotland the king's own bodyguard goes from father to eldest 
son and few new ones are elected. 

When the King comes across the border it is the privilege and 
honor of the bodyguard to sleep next to his Majesty, and while he 
is in his particular county is responsible for his safety. 

So you of the Blue Blood begin to think. The uniform and 
caparisons will appeal to you, as they will to the blue and brown 
eyes that watch vou. The honor of being bodyguard to a chief- 
tain is something, isn't it ? THINK ! 



YO SEMITE VALLEY CHAUTAUQUA. 

A great deal of interest is being manifested in different parts 
of the State in reference to the Yosemite Valley Chautauqua, 
which has been organized and which will hold its first session in 
Yosemite, July 8th to 18th inclusive. The organization of this 
Chautauqua hopes to bring about the permanent establishment 
of an educational and inspirational center in California that "ill 
hear to the Pacific Coast somewhat the relation borne to the At- 
lantic Coast by the famous New York Chautauqua. Such an ob- 
ject should appeal not alone to Californians, but to the people of 
the Pacific Coast. The official programme has now been issued, 
and may be secured on application to A. M. Drew, Secretary. 
Fresno. The railroads are making exceptionally low rates for 
the occasion, the tickets being on sale July 5th and 6th, good for 
the going trip July 5th. 6th, 7th and 8th, with return limit of 
August 31st. 



The Cliff House has been reared anew, and though three 

times in its history San Francisco's world-famous resort has 
been reduced to ashes, each time it has soared forth from the 
cinder pile accompanied by all the memories of the past. The 
new Cliff House, a big improvement on its predecessors,, is 
open tn the public. Its health and prosperity wen- pledged over 
the flowing bowl on last Tuesday evening at an informal dinner 
to officialdom and the press. Tim dinner held in t 
ami elegantly appointed main dining room was exemplar 
chefs high art ami the service was unexcelled. Among 
who gathered at the board and spoke of ih»' pas! mi 
gathered within the sounds of ocean and croaking of complacent 
seal, were Samuel M. Shortridgc. Louis Sloss and Bobert T. 
Devlin. 

Tin' entire house was thrown open fo in, and it passed 

without a flaw to notice. On Wednesday thi place was for- 
mally opened to public patnnia-e. and again, as of yore, the new 
Qliff House, yet the old. finds its . .iin in the guide books 

of the world as - heer and plenty that lure the trav- 

eler's way. Mr. George Jones and Mr. John Tait are th 
ciate managers of the new Cliff House, and thai is a guarantee 
of the first-class service and the excellence of the cuisine. Mr. 
Tait is too well known to need an introduction to the San Fran- 
cisco public, and Mr. Jones' friends are legion in clubdom and 
iety. 



The Reverend Peter C. Yorke. after a long and ui 

silence concerning political affairs, betrays symptoms of an in- 
tention to educate the voters in the coming local campaign. The 
priestly agitator will, of course, he found in the camp of his 
secular demagogic brother. P. 11. McCarthy. Father Yorke is 
not easily discouraged. The terrific defeat inflicted on the can- 
didates, for whom he ranted so virulently in the last election, 
evidently conveys im meaning to him. The lesson t 1 
American public docs not follow spiritual advisers in affairs 
political is one which the exiled ex-chancellor of the Arch 
will apparently never learn. 



Tips to Automobilists 

SAN FRANCISCO— Osen & Hunter Auto Co., 511 Golden Gate avenue 
Tel Market 2723. The San Francisco home of the "Mitchell Family." 

SAN FRANCISCO — Reed Electric Laboratories, 370 Golden Gate avenue. 
Tel. Franklin 4534. Electric repairing and sundries. Reed's electric 
lights for automobiles. Batteries repaired and recharged. 



14-MILE HOUSE — "Uncle Tom's Cabin.' 
pair shop. First class accommodations. Cuisine unsurpassed on the 
Coast. "Andy," formerly of the ,,r * u * 



Automobile Supplies and re- 
Cui~ ; - 
"ClifC House.' 



OAKLAND — Osen & Hunter Auto Co., 1224 Webster street. 
4076. The Oakland home of the "Mitchell Family." 



Tel. Oab 



MAYFIELD — Reed Electric Works, on the road. Telephone Palo Alto- 
593 R-I. Electric repairing and sundries. Batteries recharged. Gasoline 
and oils. Reed's electric lights for autos. 

SAN JOSE — Holsberg Bros., 246 W. Santa Clara (opposite Notre Dame 
Convent), upon entering town via S. F. road. Gasoline, oils, sundries and 
repairs. Seven passenger Thomas for hire. 

SAN JOSE3 — Osen & Hunter Auto Co., 1st and St. James Sts. Tel. 
Main 38. The San Jose home of the "Mitchell Family." 

SAN JOSE— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE. Market and St. James 
streets. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler and Regal agencies. 

SAN JOSE— San Jose Garage, 400 North First street, Blomdahl & 
Keller, Mgrs. Renting, repairing and sundries. Agents for Goodyear 
tires. Phone Main 121. W. F. Hunt, agent for Chalmers-Detroit, 
Thomas, Bulck and Olds. Phone Main 493. 

SAN JOSE.— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlor for ladles in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention, 

GILROY, CAL. — George E. Tlce, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Pay or night service, 260 N. Mon- 
terey street. 

WATSONVILLE. — J. H. Covell Garage. Expert machine work, auto 
supplies, batteries recharged, gas engines repaired. Autos for hire day or 
night. Corner Main street and Lick avenue. 

SANTA CRUZ.— Pacific Garage. Hunt & Grlsingher. proprietors. Auto 
repairing and supplies. Cars for hire. Phone Main 222. 353-355 Pacific 
avenue, Santa Cruz. 

SAN JUAN. — Plaza Hotel — Headquarters for automobiles and tourists 
(special attention.) Opposite the old San Juan Bautista Mission, founded 
1797. Main road to Hotel Del Monte. Tony Fatx, Jr.. Prop. 

SANTA ROSA.— Occidental Hotel. Bane Bros., props, 4th and B Sts. 
European plan, $1.00 per day and up. American plan $2.50 per day and 
up. The most up-to-date hotel north of San Francisco. Cuisine unsur- 
passed. Two garages in connection. 

HEALDSBURG, CAL.— The Union Hotel. Wade H. Etter. Opposite 
the plaza. Special attention to auto parties. First class accommodations. 
Commodious garage. 



Keenan Bros. 



Automobile Engineers, Machinists and Blacksmiths. 



273 Valencia Street, San Francisco. 



Telephone Market 1986 



IGNITION 

TROUBLES 

AVOIDED 



and at less expense and inconven- 
ience to you than at present. Rent 
your batteries from Auto Ignition Co. 
709-711 Octavla St. Phone Market 5678. 



Vulcanizing 



MARTLAND, PEART & ELKINGTON 



Phone Market 6370. 



42 Van Ness Avenue. 



San Francisco, Cal 



THE GUARANTEED VULCANIZING CO. 

84 SEVENTH STREET, opposite Post-offirr. SAN FRANCISCO 

Vulcanizing Patches on Inner Tubes. 25 cents. Work called for 
and delivered. Every repair guaranteed. 

1910 MODELS HAVE ARRIVED 

S. G. RAYL 

Northern California Representative 

583-591 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco. 




36 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 3, 1909 




■a 




JAJ^ 



HIGH ON THE HILLS. 

The hills are calling me to-day. 
Across their slopes the shadows play. 

And I must he a wandering 
By ways the winds have known along 
The uplands where the bluebird's song 

Melts in a dream of spring. 

Along the foot-path, leading high 
By rocky strips to meet the sky, 

With eager steps I follow on. 
By mossy mound and springing brake 
My skyward faring way I take 

Until the crest is won. 

High up, where life is glad and free 
A world of beauty waits for me. 

Its joyous pageants round me lie; 
No dreams of far Hesperides 
Were ever half so fair as these 

Wide sweeps of earth and sky. 

Field after field, and wooded glades, 
And the dark pines' dim colonnades, 

And farther, where the light breaks through, 
Hill after hill, till sight is lost, 
Bathed in a golden pentecost 

Of sunlight, meet my view. 

What has the gold of Araby, 

Or gifts far-brought by land and sea, 

To profit me that I should prize, 
Where beauty, rare as earth can boast, 
Is offered to me free of cost 

High up, here, next the skies ! 

— Julia E. Goodwin. 



REST, RELIEF, 
RECREATION 



CAUSE THOUSANDS TO RETREAT TO PURER LIFE- 
GIVING AIR IN SOUND OF THE BREAKERS OR T+IE 
RUSTLING LEAVES OF MOUNTAIN GROVES. THESE ARE 
THE SCENES OF HEALTH AND HOSPITALITY, WHERE 



HUNTER 



BALTIMORE 




RYE 



AN ABSOLUTELY PURE RYE WHISKEY, BRINGS CHEER 
AND COMFORT TO THOSE WHO WISELY PROVIDE IT. 



HENRY CAMPE & CO.. INC., 

Distributors for California and Nevada. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



IRISH SONGS. 
(The Sisterhood.) 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone, Douglas 4300 



I've knocked about the Sivin Seas, 

I've thraveled long and thraveled light, 

From Cardiff down to Carib keys, 

From Shanghai round to Benin Bight, 

From Botterdam to 'Frisco Bay, 

From Bristol clear to Singapore, 
I've swung and sung and had me way 

Wid wimmen that I'll see no more. 

In fjord, atoll and harbor town, 

Far North, and far beyont the Line, 

I've had thim, black and white and brown — 
And shpakin' iv'ry tongue but mine ! 

Aye, kissin' back wid furrin words 

I'd niver know the meanin' of, 
And cooin' soft loike shleepy birds 

Wid lips so tired and full av love! 

But, white or black or brown, I knew 

Not wanst their hathen tongue or name: 

Yet in the end I've found it's thrue 
Most iv'ry woman weeps the same! 

—Arthur Stringer in Smart Set. 




Phone 
Franklin 2802 

Art and Refine- 
ment are Dis- 
played by Taste- 
ful Attire 

-MAKERS OF- 



LADIES' GOWNS and FANCY COSTUMES 



1321 SUTTER STREET, New Van Ness Ave. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



ALFRED BANNISTER 



ACCOUNTANT AND AUDITOR 
1424 Post Street San Francisco 



REDUCE THE CARES 
of housekeeping. One decidedly practical way is to use Borden's Peer- 
less Brand Evaporated Milk in all cooking where milk or cream Is re- 
quired. Results will be more satisfactory than with most "fresh" milk 
The convenience and economy will please you. Dilute Peerless Milk with 
water to any desired richness. 



(J0/\L To Housekeepers 



Please remember when ordering your coal, if you want the 
GENUINE CLEAN RICHMOND COAL at wholesale prices 
and full weight, you musl order from or through us. We 
deliver in any part of the city or country in sacks or in bulk. 



J I Mnnro ft Cn J3S ' V3 PINE street, san francisco 
. J. iTlUUaC <X \jU. Phones Kearny 466 and Kearny 465 






Plan to Visit 

Yosemite Valley 

OPEN ALL YEAR 

An Ideal Place to Spend 
Your Vacation 



Surroundings perfect for rest and recreation 
Good Hotels, Gamps, Private Camping, Ex- 
penses reduced to popular prices. 



NOW REACHED BY RAIL— A QUICK, COMFORTABLE TRIP. Take Southern 
Pacific or Santa Fe to Merced. A scenic ride through the Merced Canyon. Three hours 
and a half by stage through the Park. Ask for descriptive folder, giving details. 



0. W. LEHMER, Traffic Mgr., Merced, Cal. 




BANKING 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, IN 
AND FOR THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

SUMMONS, Action No. 15776 Dept. 1. 

FREDERICK MARRIOTT, Plaintiff, vs. All persons claiming any in- 
terest in or lien upon the real property herein described or any part 
thereof, Defendants. 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, to all persons 
claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real property herein described, 
or any part thereof, Defendants, GREETING: 

You are hereby required to appear and answer the complaint of FRED- 
ERICK MARRIOTT, Plaintiff, filed with the clerk of the above entitled 
Court and County, within three months after the first publication of 
this summons, and to set forth what interest or lien, if any, you have in 
or upon that certain real property, or any part thereof, situated in the 
City and County of San Francisco, State of California, and particularly 
described as follows: 

BEGINNING at a point on the northerly line of Green street, distant 
thereon one hundred and ninety-three (193) feet three and three-fourths 
(3 3-4) inches westerly from the corner formed by the intersection of the 
northerly line of Green street with the westerly line of Jones street, and 
running thence westerly and along said line of Green street forty-five 
(46) feet; thence at a right angle northerly one hundred and twenty (120) 
feet; thence at a right angle easterly forty-five (45) feet; and thence at 
a right angle southerly one hundred and twenty (120) feet to the point 
of beginning. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so appear and answer, the 
plaintiff will apply to the court for the relief demanded in the complaint, 
to-wit, that it be adjudged that plaintiff Is the owner of said property 
In fee simple absolute; that his title to said property be established and 
quieted; that the court ascertain and determine all states, rights, titles, 
interests and claims in and to said property, and every part thereof, 
whether the same be legal or equitable, present or future, vested or con- 
tingent, and whether the same consist of mortgages or liens of any de- 
scription; that plaintiff recover his costs herein and have such other 
an d f urther relief as may be meet in the premises. 

WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court, this 20th day of 
April, A. D. 1909. 

H. I. MULCREVY. Clerk, By JAS. P. KANE, Deputy Clerk. 

MEMORANDUM. — The first publication of this summons was made In 
the SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, a newspaper, on the 8th day of 
May, A. D., 1909. 

The following persons are said to claim an Interest In. or lien upon, 
said property, adverse to plaintiff: 

W. LADD. as Executor of the last will and testament of BENJAMIN 
HBALEY, Deceased, San Francisco, California. 

City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 

Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public. 2004 Sutter street, corner Fillmore 
street. All legal papers drawn up accurately. Phone West 3016. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle *:hair. 1714 
Market street, near Oetwta. Telephone Fell 9911. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D. r D. D. S., Surgerv of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly of James Flood Building, 814 Eddy 
street. San Francisco. Cal. _ ^ ^^^^^^ 

ATTORNEYS- AT-LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law. Chronicle Building. San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Drs. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Rtegelhaupt. Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly of 6 Geary Street, 
remove Corns EntireK Whole-Painless-Without Knife. Bunions anJ IngTOwing Nails 
Cured by a Special and Painless Treatment. 905-106 Westbank Building. Sio Market 
Street. San FranclSCO. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES 

Peoples Express Company. Baggage checked to all parts of the United States at the 
hotels and residences in Oakland. Alameda and Berkeley. Special attention^ to transbay 
P*Ee*fie- Phones Oakland 444?: Alameda 4<;6: Berkeley 14: San Francisco, Kea- 

Rnichac Back to our old location 623 Sacramento Street between 
OlUSllrS Kearny and Montgomery Streets 

With full line of Brushes. Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand 
and made to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buck- 
ets. Chamois. Metal Polish and Cleaning Powders. Hardware. Wood 
and Willow War*. 

Call. Write or Telephone Kearny 5787. 

Wm. Buchanan 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO ESTABLISHED 1867 

B. E. WALKER, President 

ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager 



Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 6,000,000 

TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are is- 
sued in denominations of 

$10, $20, $50, $100 and $200 
and the exact amount payable in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland is stated on the face of each cheque, while in other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. 

BRUCE HEATHCOTE, MANAGER. 
San Francisco OHice-CALIFORNIA AND SANSOME STS. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
526 CALIFORNIA ST., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000.000 00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds l 479 043' 00 

Deposits 35,079.498.63 

Total Assets 37,661,836.70 

Remittances may be made by Draft, Post Office, or Wells, Fargo & 
Co.'s Money Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock m., and Saturday evenings from 7 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock 
p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— President. N. Ohlandt; First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; 
Second Vice-President. Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant 
Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secre- 
tary, A. H. Muller; Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, Ign. 
Steinhardt, I. N. Walter. J. W. Van Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. 
Kruse and W. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH, 2672 Mission street, between 21st and 22d streets. 
For receipt and payment of deposits only. C. W. Heyer, manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH. 432 Clement Street, between 6th 
and 6th avenues. For receipt and payment of deposits only. W. C. 
Heyer, manager. 

Central Tins! Company of California 

Market and Sansome Sts. Branches 3039 16th St.; 624 Van Ness Avenue. 

Accounts of Individuals, firms, corporations, unions, societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts. Drafts sold on all parts of the world. 
Capital paid-in. $1,500,000 Surplus. $100,000 

B. G. TOGNAZZI. Manager. 



French Savings Bank 



108 SUTTER ST.. NEAR MONTGOMERY. 

Paid-up Capital $600,000 

Total Assets $4,270,800 

Strictly a savings bank. Open Saturday evenings from 7 to 8:30. 

OFFICERS — Charles Carpy. President; Arthur Legallet. First Vice- 
President; Leon Bocqueraz, Second Vice-President; A. Bousquet. Secre- 
tary; A. Bergerot. Attorney. 

DIRECTORS — X. C. Babin. J. A. Bergerot. O. Boslo, Charles Carpy. 
Arthur LegallPt. G. Beleney. H. d<- St. Seine, J. M. Dupas. Leon Boc- 
queraz, J. E. Artlgues. J. S. Godeau. John Ginty. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT. 
The French-American Bank occupies offices in the same building. 

Italian-American Bank 

S. E. Corner Montgomery and Sacramento Sts. 

Paid-up Capital $750,000.00 

Surplus 210,000.00 

Conduct general banking business. Dealers in foreign exchange. 

Officers — A. Sbarboro. President; A. E. Sbarbory. Cashier; H. J. 
Crocker. Vice-President; R. A. Sbarboro. Assistant Cashier. 

Anglo and London Paris National Bank 

N. E. COR. SANSOME AND PINE STREETS. 
Capital. J4.000.000 Surplus, $1,200,000 

SIG. GREENEBAUM. President: H. FLEISHHACKER. Vice-President 
and Manager; ALDEN ANDERSON. Vice-President: J. FRIEDLANDER. 
Vice-President: R. ALTSCHUL. Cashier: C. F. HUNT. Assistant Cashier, 
A. HOCHSTEIN. Assistant Cashier: F. E. BECK. Assistant Cashier. 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 

-DON'T BORROW TROUBLE." BUY 

SAPOLIO 

'TIS CHEAPER IN THE END. 




The 



Egyptian 
Cigarette 
of Quality 

AJLOMATIC DELICACY 

MILDNESS 

PURITY 



At your Club or Dealer's or 
THB SURBRUQ CO., Makers, New York 






Canned Izumi Crab 




For a delicious salad, creamed, curried or chafing dish. 



RETAILS: 

$3.50 per doz. 
1 pound tin 



IZUMI Brand Crab is of the finest quality. It is 
caught and packed on the Eastern coast of 
Siberia where the water is very cool and the fish 
the fines! in the world. Packed under the slrid 
pure food law of Japan. 



We carry several other brands of crab: Retails— 

$2.25 — $2.75 per doz., 1 pound tin 



For Sale by all Jobbers and Grocers 
SOLE AGENTS FOR IZUMI CRAB 

North American Mercantile 

Company, Inc. 

318-320 Front Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 



Good Things To Eat 

are made with good ingredients. 
All that is good in milk is contained in 

BORDEN'S 
PIONEER BRAND 

EVAPORATED MILK 

(Unsweetened) 



Send for Recipe "Book 
Borden's Condensed Milk Co. 
Leaders of Quality" 
NEW YORK 




Northwestern 

Pacific 
lt.lt. 



Special-Rates 
For the 4th of July Holidays 



Purchase tickets in advance at the uptown ticket 
office 874 Market St., Flood Bldg. and have baggage 
checked direct from residence. 




SAN FRANCISCO NATIONAL BANK, CORNER CALIFORNIA AND UBDB8D0RF STREETS. 





EWKUvrm 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. LXXVIII 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 10, 1909 



No. 2 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market St, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second class mall matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway. C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office — 30 Cornhiil, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

Ail social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication In 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 

-The Wright brothers are described by a Baltimore belle 

as pretty fly boys. 

Still no news from Peary at the pole. He may still be 

dashing around trying to find it. 

— — Mr. Pinhead McCarthy still has hallucinations. He 
thinks he is going- to be Mayor. 

An Eastern newspaper has a headline which reads: "Dem- 
ocracy in the East." There isn't any. 

Kermit Roosevelt is so fond of following in his lather's 

footsteps that he killed seven cheetahs in one day. 

The nickel-in-the-sloi machine fiend will have to move 

his habitat to Oakland or buy a second-hand machine and let 
his wife operate it. 

Somebody has been trying to kidnap Abdul Hamid. We 

always thought there was some resemblance to Older in the CFn- 
speakahle's facial expression. 

Pumper crops! That is what we hear from all over the 

land. Patten is going to be proven the worsl kind of a liar. This 
is so of all other produce as well as of cereals. 

The resident orehardist in Messina district has an easy 

time of it. All lie has to do is to wait undeT the trees, and an 
earthquake comes along ami shakes the oranges into his basket. 

Taxing net incomes is akin to painting landscapes on 

summer clouds with invisible colors and an air brush, it sounds 
good, but it is not a tangible source of method to secure a 
revenue. 

Some college professor says that I In- tirst duty of 

America's budding womanhood is to learn lo say "no!" This is 
had advice. Woman acquires the "no" habii at birth and never 
gets over it. 

— — A five million dollar corporation is about to build new 
steamer- lo develop trade along the Mississippi. What's the mat- 
ter with a like corporation hero to develop the San Joaquin and 
the Sacramento? 

A scientist says thai no man can tell a lie without wig- 
gling his loos, especially the big ones. It would !»• a good idea 
to make the tariff tinkers argue with their shoes oil', and in full 
view of the people. 

The nature fakers are not all dead. Here's one by the 

name of John Howard Jewet, who tells of a fox who was trained 
to play hall, catching the hall from the hat with his teeth. Ernes! 
Hyphen Thompson cannot heat that, although he is such a good 
juggler with his own name. 

And now a French professor comes out and says thai 

the French people are decadent. Tie adds (hat this is due to In- 
decency, Alcoholism, ami the Loss of Spiritual id. 'as. This is 
pretty tough on the part of Mr. Lavollee, hut. ni passant; rfs a 
pretty dirty little bird that befouls its own nest 

It was a real scoop this time. The Call scored heavily on 

all of them, .and the next morning they were all standing around 
wiping their eyes and wondering what hail happened. Mr, 
Hearst of Nowhere will make the win:- hot enquiring as to why 
the stuffed owls in the local room didn't get the news. 



-The Young Turk must lie growing whiskers. 

-1'ntil the Portola festival, all roads lead to San 



Fran- 



— ■ — A girl thirteen years old. living with her stepmother, be 
il noted, was arrested a week or two ago for shoplifting. Tim 
reflection on (he stepmother is not very creditable. Tt is hardly 
likely that a girl of such tender years would voluntarily enter 
upon -ue!) an occupation; and the presumption is strong that she 
must have been "coached" by some older person. 

Carrie Nation Bays that she has the right to certain ter- 
ritory in Southwestern Kansas. Her title is disputed by an old 
rosidenter. with verdigris whiskers, who says he settled there 
under a grant from Presideni Harrison the First. He calls 
Carrie names, ami she retorts, and there is a chance for a fine 
scrap. Better put a fence around tin- place and give them both 
a copious supply of dynamite bombs. 

Dollars and sense is a phrase that is often used, hut 

whether it is spelled in the good old way or in the new, it i- not 
ni appropriate attribute of the big corporation. .lodging by the 
high-handed methods of some institutions who should have 
learned much by experience, the Sugar Trust, for instance, it 
should read dollars and nonsense. Some of our larger financial 
institutions are always courting disaster and breed antagonism 

to the people upon whom they depend for a living. 

The people resident in near-by cities where the water 

shortage is beginning now realize the necessity of making into a 
law fhe suggestion of the News Letter that water companies be 
forbidden the extension of distribution before making adequate 
increase of supply and storage. The first communities supplied 
have the call on the company's delivery, and if the original con- 
sumer cannot he protected fully in his rights, the newcomer must 
wait until the storage is increased. The next legislature should 
pass this into law. 

By the way, P. H. McCarthy might furnish the "down- 
trodden toilers/' even though of the "objectionable race." some 
assistance. The cause of labor is sacred, irrespective of nation- 
ality. At least that is what agitators of the Pin-Head type are 
always telling us. Tin- San Francisco demagogue, however, is 
busily engaged at present in hogging assistance from his dupes. 
fhe tantalizing dream of a future Mayor of this municipality, 
named McCarthy, haunts his nights and occupies all his time 
mil energy during daylight hours. 

Seven hundred ami twenty newspapers have given us that 

moth-eaten, diisl-covered. crippled, lop-sided, cross-eyed, how- 
legged and inn pigram of Edward Everett Hale's beginning: 

"Look up and noi down, look onl and not in," etc. If you follow 
(hat advice to the letter you'll fall over the cliff, step in the 
paint [iol, jamb your eye on the edge of the door, catch vour lin- 
ger in the circular saw. hammer your thumb with (he tack ham- 
mer, catch your index linger in the lathe .gear, and chop oil' your 
big loe with the axe. Hale may have been all right as an ordinary 
man, hut as a epigrammatist he was punk. 

A lady writes to a local daily, staling (hat marriageable 

men are becoming as extinct as a dodo, and that civilization is 
confronted with the problem of an Adamless Eden. Methinks 
the lady must have formed her conception of a "marriageable 

man" From reading Dorothy Dis or Mrs. Wilcox. The male biped 

who conns up lo the requirements specified by these connoisseurs 

of I he hymeneal problem has not yet been horn. If. in some 
whimsical caprice, Mature should allow such a freak lo cumber 
the earth, it is to he hoped that some ull ra-li nicil maiden will 

capture him. 



The Third Degree is one of the 
The Thibd Degree. anomalies of our judicial or legal 

system of Government. The wrack 
has been abolished, but the caricature of the wrack remains. We 
have laws on our statute books making it wrongful to extract 
confessions from suspected persons, and we know that when a 
witness is on a stand, he may refuse to testify on the ground that 
to testify may incriminate him. A man may not testify himself 
into jail except by voluntary confession. We are growing every 
day into methods which belong to the dark ages in the handling 
of people who are suspected of crime. 

The Third Degree is probably one of the most horrible tor- 
ments invented by man, because it is a slow and insidious mental 
torture, and the information elicited by such methods is of a 
character which renders it absolutely valueless in court. It is a 
case of (be end justifying the means, and is on a par with that 
other indefensible act of the police which consists in holding in 
jail for months on the small book, without charge or explana- 
tion, while investigations are going on. More than one private 
vengeance has been sated in this way. 

Within the last few years, in one of the larger bay cities, a man 
was charged by a wholesale grocer with embezzlement of goods 
and an arrest followed. The man was locked up, and no investi- 
gation was made. It soon developed that he was mildly insane. 
Slill the police held him in jail, and the ex-employer failed to 
press the charge. For three months the man languished in the 
pen, until one id' the editors of the Xews Letter received a letter 
from him. calling attention lo the outrageous affair. Scenting 
trouble, the authorities released the prisoner. The. whole affair 
from beginning to end was run in the most high-handed manner, 
ami the release of the prisoner was no less illegal than bis origi- 
nal detention. 

Investigation showed that the man had been hired as a peddler, 
and thai be bad qui! the employ of the wholesale grocer, and 

taken employ with a competitor, lie was a German and quite 

Capable and, resenting bis loss, the first employer bail him ar- 
rested on a false charge, lie lav in jail among felons I'm' three 
months. The man's mind is completely shattered. 

This is only one ease in plenty of the disastrous effect id' the 
del i n He book methods. 

The Third Degree must have Originated ill the mind of a 

brutal, incapable detective, aid it has been improved upon by all 
the descendants of the same brutal, incapable man. It is a con- 
fession of inability as a sleuth, and the information elicited is 

worse than worthless, as it is more often false than 

Professor Munsterberg, who has investigated criminals and 
Criminal chasers, holds thai it is Useless, and that then' are " 

means of arriving at results, lie has invented a mechanical 
electric contrivance real help al arriving at the 

guilt of suspected people. The evidence o i m 1 lould be se- 

cured by other means than brutality or , riiellv. and In tie' 
Cleverness of the detectives set to unraveling crime. It is an 
easy matter to drive a man into insane confession by keeping him 
from sleep for fifty or sixty hours, by shouting at him. and 
threatening him with all the horrors of the Inquisition, by Sash- 
ing eh.ni> lights at him every time he drops into a doze, hut it is 
net easy, nay. well nigh impossible, to find one detective out of 
five hundred who has enough intelligence or sense to pound sand 
into a rat hole. 

Both methods, the one of arrest and detention without pre- 
ferring a charge against the prisoner ami holding him in 
municado, and the other, of extorting confession of guilt b] 
hire, are plainly in violation .if and in evasion of the law's in 
Such provisions are the protest of the modern against the meth- 
od- -,. when rack and hoot and the burning and the 
wrung from the lies of victims confessions thai in man;, 
stances were me i further infliction of age: 



were more cruel than the punishment, for the crime itself. That 
these laws, the result of the wisdom and humanities of the ages, 
are set at naught by every flat-headed and ignorant and brutally 
inclined detective and police authority is a reproach upon our 
times and civilization. That a violation of the law is resorted 
to by those charged with its enforcement, is an incentive to the 
commission of crime by those before whom the example is set. 
"Necessity demands it," is the craven excuse of the law-breaking 
and inefficient police official who resorts to it, and the same de- 
fense ought to hold good when presented by the thug who oilers 
his hunger and a need for money as reason for plying the black- 
jack. The police powers must operate within the law. When they 
have recourse lo the breaking of it in order to enforce it, the 
matter plainly becomes one in which the official at fault is plainly 
ill-fitted to continue in authority, 'time was, in the past, when 
the jurist of the cruet and heartless type was considered the model 
of the judge. The world thinks differently now, and our judicial 
system to that extent has beneficially progressed. The police 
arm, however, is in need of reform, and its methods court re- 
vision. Conditions poinl lo the intelligence and humanity, as 
well as an appreciation of the law. as being more essential in 
the qualities id' police authority than hulk ami muscularity. 
There is no need for violation of law or evasion in order to 
enforce it, and the excuse I'm' 80 doing becomes criminal when 

offered by the law executing power. It is a travesty that pardons 
Hie dogma of anarchy. Protest against such methods is fre- 
quently entered, and the resorl to them by the police of New York 

in extorting confession from the Chinese associate of the r- 

derer of Klsie Seigle dulls the brutal edge of the tragedy ilself. If 

practiced upon an American in similar stress by Chinese officials, 
the gone would he vigorously sounded I'm- battleships to cross the 
main ami rescue the victim from the clutch of the barbarian. 

Has il come io he that the crux of barbarism is merely distance 

from home. 



(loon Roads. 



The salvation of the farmer, and in- 

ntallj of the en ire counl ry, de- 
pends mi its g 1 roads. Bad 

roads mean 6 saster and loss to the agriculturist, ami Ibis is in 
no Siate iii ih,' Union so true as in California. 
The season- are -o distinctly separate. We have ••half .1 

of dust and flowers, half a vear of wind and showers,"" and the 

wet and tin' dry seaso markedly typical that the mads 

suffer from the sudden outpouring of rain ami wildcat- are 
numerous, while in the dry season flic surfacing is easily broken 
up into dust and rrtt. 

The farmer of California should he included in on 
good roads club. Every little communal center should have its 
club, where the making w g I n 'be weekly topic 

of conversation. 

It should be apparent to every man who raises produce ' 
good road to town or railroad siding is an asset, ami wje 
taken into consideration that the statistical reports <>: 
states Government show that good ro 

ami in many instances less, every f 

and every orchardist should be willing to lend 

the making of the highways - ilifornia H 

the land has ever known. 

The price of produce is the highest when the roads of the coun- 
try are at their worst. The cost of transportation is a 
over the vehicular routes when the tran- 
difliculf. Good roads at such times would mean larger profits. 

A good road to town or railroad - - r life 

draft animals, and an equally ' 
[f. It ne -iter conditions for f] 

In one of the inties of California 

mated that in a given period of 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1909 



been expended on roads, and that it was not until the experts of 
the Government were sent out from Washington that the people 
realized that politicians, quarry men, boomers of real estate and 
other tyros were not the propei persons to trust with road con- 
struction. 

It is the purpose of the News Letter, in the future as in the 
past, to agitate for the formation of the good roads club to the 
end that the parries most interested, that is, the producers, take 
an interest in a question that is vital to their welfare. No count)' 
ever secures good, reliable roads until the farmer takes hold, and 
this is the history of the experience of the Government's experts 
in road making! All other classes seem to prefer makeshifts 
when they are not simply agitating the question for graft and 
personal aggrandizement. When the rest of the community will 
come to realise that the prosperity of the country rests on the 
base of the prosperity of the farmer, then we will have good 
roads, and when the farmer realizes that to ensure his own pros- 
perity he must take the matter of roads in his own hands, pros- 
perity will follow. Let us have good roads in the best State in 
the Union, and let us have happy, prosperous farmers and a eon- 
sequent happy people. Form your little good roads -club in 
every little farming center. 

The commission merchant, by the 

The Privateer force of his organization, is in close 

Commission Man. touch with the producer. Because 

of this close relationship, he has the 

canners of the city of San Francisco practically at his mercy. 

It is because of the relationship, between the canner and the 
commission man and the producer, that the cannery, one of the 
largest employing agencies in the city, has been driven into the 
country. 

Here in San Francisco we have the required labor in abund- 
ance. But other conditions are not so favorable, and the prices 
for fruit are extortionate. 

This is the way of it, and this is the reason why we find the 
canners moving countrywards. 

There is no orchardist that at times is not wanting accommo- 
dations. He may require money, or it may be supplies that he 
needs, and the commission man is ready to let him have both. 
It is thus that the commission man secures the strangle-hold 
on the fruit grower, and, when the note is exchanged for the 
money, the orchardist becomes a pawn in the game, to be moved 
hither and yon by the commission man in gaining advantage over 
the canner. The canner, of course, is no saint, and he, too, is 
out looking after the interests of "number one," and the com- 
mission man comes on to testify to that fact and further impress 
upon his victim, with the promised harvest, that their interests 
are as one. 

The canner can only purchase the select part of the crop, 
the two and a half inch Bartletts, and the commission pirate 
can handle it all; the latter and his confederates tie up the crop, 
and the canner is at their mercy. As far as San Francisco is 
concerned, they have him, always, tied hand and foot. 



several lots or blocks for free market purposes for the use of in- 
dividual producers or a duly accredited representative of the 
producer's associations or organizations. The Eastern shipper 
will buy of those who have to sell in quantities. 



A few years ago the Pacific Cannery, 
An Instance in a Chinese concern, ventured out 

the Game. among the orchardists to purchase, 

for their own use; a few tons were 
secured on options for $25 a ton. Twenty-four hours afterwards, 
through the hocus-pocussing of the commission pirate, the crop 
of that season was being quoted at $G0 per ton — and the trees 
were not yet fruited ! 

To scare the producers, commission men telephoned and tele- 
graphed 'everywhere to their agents, and by dangling before the 
eyes of the orchardist the alarming rumor of an almost total 
failure of the pear crop and a consequent scarcity, prices soared. 
The foolish fruit men bit ; they all did. Pears rotted on the trees 
that year. They were dumped from the wharves by the train 
load and but a very few were canned. Prices later went down 
to nothing. The orchardist would have made money, would have 
beer fortunes in pocket, had it not been for the baneful influence 
of the commission man. who had nothing to lose and everything 
to gain. He was the only gainer — by the few tons of pears sold 
early in the game at the enormons prices secured through the 
dissemination of his false informa+ion as to orchard crops" 

In order to preserve the equities between the producer and the 
consumer, it would seem that the commission merchant must be 
eliminated. The State, or the various cities, should reserve 



Express and 
Railway Charges 



No one will deny that the farmer 
would like to have his freight bill re- 
duced to such an extent that it 
would take a pretty powerful micro- 
scope to And it. The cry against freight and express charges is. 
as a rule, folly. Take eggs as an instance. A case of eggs is 
brought from any of the producing points about San Francisco 
from sixty to seventy-five miles, for "25c. a case. That is less 
than one cent a dozen. Now note this: when eggs are begging 
up in the country at 18 and 19 cents, they are quoted at twenty- 
five to twenty-seven cents in this city. This, it must be seen by 
the merest tyro, is a tremendous profit to make on an essential. 
Fruit and potatoes may be brought down the Sacramento for 
from 5 to 8 cents a sack. High prices are manufactured by the 
produce combine so as to more easily plunder the producer. 



The producer does not profit by the 
The Fake Hifiii Price, establishment of combine-made high 
prices. Nothing is made by such 
methods by the produce]'. There is more money in fruit raising 
to sell one thousand boxes of peaches at twenty-five to thirty 
cents than at GO cents a box. This is what it resolves itself into 
season after season. The consumer is plucked, but he limits his 
purchases. The great consuming population of San Francisco 
and Oakland, in the very heart of the finest, richest and most 
productive fruit growing section of the whole world, is limited 
by reason of cost to a far smaller consumption of orchard pro- 
duets per capita than is St. Louis and Kansas City. St. Louis 
is half negro in population, and Kansas City is not far behind 
in its colored citizenry. Water melons sell for 10 to 15 cents 
apiece, retail. These are great, huge water melons. 

Peaches go for 15 to 20 cents a basket. Grapes at about the 
same price. Great baskets of Concords are sold at ten cents, in 
the season. St. Louis and Kansas City have vast public and free 
markets. Chickens, in that land, which is half winter all the 
time, are quoted at twenty-five cents. It is the vast markets 
that do it. The producer flocks in from everywhere, with good 
roads to run over, with low freight rates, and with everything 
in his favor, and the wagons are loaded to the axles. They 
barter and sell from early dawu until the set of sun. The hotels, 
families and the consumer in general, buy their supplies there. 

Washington, D. C, offers the same condition, and the farmer 
about these cities have money in bank. 

Our farmers, despite high prices, complain of no profits and 
no money in bank. The commission buccaneer and the fact 
that we have not provided the farmer with good roads and free 
markets, is what is at the bottom of all the troubles of the agri- 
culturist and the consumer in California. We should have the 
finest roads in the world, and we have not. We should be a fruit- 
eating, fruit consuming people, and we are not. Fruit should 
be the larger part of our diet, and it is the smallest, and fruit in 
San Francisco is a luxury. You can buy better California fruit 
of all kinds in Saint Paul, Minnesota, at about the same prices, 
than you can buy in San Francisco in the season. 

The commission buccaneer keeps up the prices, and bad roads 
and no free markets are the conditions that help him in his for- 
ays on the public and the consumer. He creates the abnormal 
and prevents the normal. "He catches 'em comin' and goin'." 

The free market must not be placed, as it was in San Fran- 
cisco, in the hands of the Harbor Commissioners. That body 
has quite enough to do handing about the political rewards in the 
shape of jobs and keeping up the constant alterations on the 
Ferry building, without meddling with free markets. It is un- 
thinkable that a wise man and deep thinker, such as William H. 
Mills undoubtedly was, should have incubated an idea that was 
to be known later as a "Socialistic Experiment," The Free 
Market is not an experiment at all. It is a tried and useful and 
successful institution. It is manifest that if you would have 
a tree grow that you would not place its life in jeopardy by 
handing over its care to one who had determined, before taking 
on the trust, to chop it down. It is surely a foolish thing to 
have given over the free market to business men who are by every 
tie, by friendship and by custom, allied to the men who deny to 
the farmer, the orchardist, the chicken raiser and the grower of 



July 10, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



berries the benefits of normal and healthy competition in sale 
and purchase. The Free Market is a success everywhere that it 
has been tried — except in San Francisco. By one stroke of the 
pen. aided by an underhanded onslaught by the commission 
merchants who captured the works by consent of the commis- 
sioners, an institution that was wisely designed to make the fruit 
and berry business, the egg and produce business, many times 
larger than it is to-day, was wiped out of existence. Years of 
thought by the wisest publicist California has ever known were 
wiped out by one moment of heedless stupidity by the Harbor 
Commission. This error must be retrieved. The mantle of 
William H. Mills fell from his shoulders when he died, and 
there has no one been found of depth or breadth of mind large 
enough to pick it up. 



The business interests of San Fran- 
Harmony and Discord, cisco are united for harmony, while 

the people themselves, or that par- 
ticular section of the people which is opposed' to Mr. Calhoun and 
his railroad, are representative of discord ; and this does not 
mean discord in business circles alone,' but makes for acrimony, 
division and hatreds in private and social existence. 

Why not admit that the entire prosecution is wrong and that 
it has gone about its work in the most careless and slipshod 
manner. Why not admit that there is no possibility of convict- 
ing Mr. Calhoun without proof? It has been shown that with- 
out any evidence to counteract that offered by the prosecution, 
and relying solely on the sense of fairness that actuates a jury, 
Mr. Calhoun was practically acquitted of the charges brought 
against him by Mr. Spreckels and his aids. There is nothing 
to show that any further trial would bring any more tangible 
result to the people, through the District Attorney, than ex- 
penses. These expenses, by the way, are no small matter, and the 
bill will have to be footed up by the people. Mr. Calhoun was 
practically acquitted, and the verdict must be taken as an en- 
dorsement, no matter how much the special prosecutor may ani- 
madvert or the Bulletin screech about it. 

It is about time the people call a halt and that harmony pre- 
vail once more in the community, to the end that all may work 
together for the common good. The commercial and industrial 
bodies are a unit in their expression of disapproval. There are 
a number of labor unions who object to the continuance of the 
persecution. Why not come together with a will to make pros- 
perity a permanent fixture and banish the hard times, always 
attendant on civic discord? 



The people of the United States do 
A Warning to Taft. not want an upward revision of 
the tariff. The people of the United 
Slates waul closer relations with the Philippines. There should 
be no tariffl restrictions between the United States and it- 
farthest outpost. 

The people look to the President to enforce their will. Con- 
gress has failed utterly in carrying out the wishes of the people, 
and has surrendered to and dragoon to be trusts. The 

House is subservienl to the Senate, and the Senate no longei 
represents the wishes of the Legislatures of the various state-, 
hut represents apecial interests. We nave had he exhibition of 
men from various northern and southern States admitting, with 
unparalleled ell'ronterv. being interested in the industries for 
which they were demanding an additional impost to be wrung 

In, in an alrea.lv n\ or-l,,i, ■ !. lie. We know that Aldrieh 

and his gang arc in tin- Senate, not for the p repre- 

senting the State Legislatures as the me-- : their will, 

hut that, having bough! their several ways to the Senate, they 
senting their own and their employers 1 money. 
The News Letter doesn'1 wish to accept the common rumor 

'resident Taft has surrendered his manhood and his nobility 

to i hi- crew of wreckers. The New- Letter, a Democratic news- 
paper, has given Taft support in season and out of season, and 
it does not see a single reason for a change of view. 

Taft has the power of the veto, and it is hoped that he will 

rly and often. 
The Democratic party is without leaders and without 
or guide. II 'S without hope of victory, and S 
brains in its alleged big in mnd. 

To resuscitate the party, to wrest it from the Bryans an 
sons and other hot-air nincompoops is a duty whii 
not fall to Mr. A!'r lie. It is rich in traditi, 

it has served its pui 



If the Aldrieh tariff programme is lo he followed out, then 
the old Republican party is also beginning the task of casting 
off its life. If is not to Mr. Aldrieh thai ii will turn in i 
fcremis and ask for life. 

Taft is the only man who can save the Republii an party. Ee 
can re-create it. He can give it life. lie can scrape nil' the blood- 
sucking vampires and leeches such as Cannon, Aldrieh and 
Payne, and sweep himself into power, for a second term, as the 
most popular man ever elected. It is a condition calling for 
firmness and statesmanship. Is Taft equal to the task? 

In the case that Mr. Taft is the molly-coddle his false friends 
describe him. then it means that the "I WILL COME BACK" 
of Theodore Roosevelt looms up as big with events as any utter- 
ance ever given voice by man. It means that Roosevelt's "I will 
come back" will bring him to us, and that at the next Presi- 
dential election will be waged a fight meaning in its results the 
life or death of the Republic. 

Taft is a President without the brass band and the theatrics. 
but if it is true that only the big stick prevails, and that Taft 
is already surrendered to the trusts, let us have the big stick 
with blare and noise and fight and conquest and freedom. We, 
the people, want a downward revision of the tariff. 



The corner of Grant avenue and 
Abate the Nuisance. Market, street is one at which the 
• activity of traffic is most manifest, 
and yet the Board of Public Works has allowed the maintenance 
of all sorts of nuisances and obstructions at this particular 
place. The noise is deafening, and the smoke, sand and dust 
is an additional insult to the injury already assessed on the citizen 
by making the street well nigh impassable. 

A great dummy engine belches out volumes of coal soot and 
smoke, and there is the continual dumping of sand into an over- 
head hopper from which it is dropped into wagons below and on 
the passing wayfarer. 

The contractor, who has this particular building in his charge, 
should be taken gently aside by the Board of Works inspector, 
and told that this infliction of unnecessary hardship must stop 
at once. The dummy engine may easily be dispensed with alto- 
gether, and indeed there is no excuse for its use. Tn these days 
of electric power, such an engine belongs to the ante-bellum per- 
iod. The smoke is in itself injurious to every dealer in merchan- 
dise for blocks around, and people who have to pass and repass 
this corner are annoyed by the swirl of sand from the uncovered 
carrier as it swings into place to make its regular deposits in the 
wagons. The whole affair is exceedingly primitive, and with it 
all are elements of danger, of maiming by the breaking of tackle, 
which does not seem oi -nil'., ient weight to carry the load- to 
which it is subjected, and also because of the flimsy construction 
e i, mnorary wooden sidewalks. The whole should be subjected 
to rigid inspection, and Chi objectionable features should be 
eliminated, that the public for blocks a round may enjoy life. 




XCHAS KEJLUStfCC 
EXCHC/S/VTE * 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No Branch Scores. No Agents. 

WHEN MEN WANT GOOD CLOTHES THEY MUST SELECT A GOOD 
SHOP. HERE IS JUST SUCH A PLACE. WITH A LARGE. CORRECT 
STOCK. OUR CLOTHES ARE MADE FOR US BY THE MOST TAL- 
ENTED MAKERS. WE STUDY EVERY GOOD POINT TO HAVE OUR 
CLOTHES RIGHT. AND WHEN YOU FIND OUR KINO IT IS IN AN 
EXCLUSIVE SHOP. 



Brokaw Bros.. 
New York. 

Mail. Clothes. 






Are now included 
in our album 
of make re. 



- ii smartness not required here. All we ask of our 
salesmen is to be attentive. We nave no "premium system" t-> 
disqualify truth. Here you gel exactly what you want or no 
sale. You're not coerced by a "turnover salesman." We only 
handle exclusive clothes shop the kind made for 

"needle to an anchor" St "ten up for 

and the "P. M." system < "ir absolutely different 

f way. 



Jewelers Building, Post Street, near Kearny, San Francisco 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1909 




SMKER0N 




The Call's writer on naval subjects has been making an ass of 
himself again, likewise of his paper, by delivering himself of 
some marvelous opinions regarding the new British warships "l 
the Invincible class, which have recently startled the world by 
developing a speed in excess of twenty-five knots. The Call 
man says: "The Invincible is not a fighting ship in any sense. 
She was not built to tight, but to run.'' In view of the fact 
that the Invincible carries eight 12-inch guns in her main bat- 
tery, it would be extremely interesting to know just what the 
Call man regards as constituting a fighting ship. Inasmuch as 
the United States navy, with the exception of the new Michigan 
and South Carolina, does not at the present time contain a sin- 
gle ship carrying more than four guns of calibre as great as 12 
inches, the fighting capacity of our navy may be open to serious 
doubt, if the Call is to be believed. The fact of the matter is, 
that the Invincible can lick the stuffing out of any ship of the fleet 
that recently circumnavigated the globe under the Stars and 
Stripes. She can run, oh, yes, but run after the other fellow, 
and catch him before he can get away. 

If tiic daily newspapers are too penurious to employ a man 
competent to write intelligently upon naval subjects, let. them 
avoid making themselves ridiculous by discussing such subjects. 

Wake up. Mr. Call Naval Expert. 

* * * 

I witnessed a laughable scene in a moving picture show 
last week. A rural old gentleman and his wife, of a type now 
rare, were gazing at the exhibition with undisguised wonder. It 
was evidently a complete novelty to them. The pair watched 
beautiful young women step out of nothingness in obedience to 
the wand of the magician ; their faces were a study as they ob- 
served the potent effect of a mysterious powder when sprinkled 
on a lazy messenger boy; the pictures of the Civil War pleased 
them immensely,- and the portrayal of a banquet, delineated with 
the ultra-magnificence which the managers well know appeals to 
the masses, drew from them exclamations of wonder. Finally 
the operator threw on the screen the semblance id' a Xew York 
Central express train, rushing at full speed. As the gigantic 
engine, puffing and steaming along a track which apparently led 
into the body of the theatre, suddenly switched aside at terrific 
speed, on the very edge of the first row of chairs, the old 
lady hurriedly arose from her seat and rushed out of the place, 
followed by her husband. "You don't drag me into no stub 
place no more," she exclaimed, to her astonished protector, "I 
never was so scart in my life." 

* * * 

Extensive maneuvres are about to be undertaken by the 
United States Navy on the Atlantic Coast. They will doubtless 
be profitable and eminently successful. But they would be more 
so if the army acted jointly with the navy in their conduct. The 
real aim of such maneuvres is to simulate (lie conditions of actual 
warfare, with a view of preparing the service for the problems 
which the latter may present. The lack of harmony between 
army and navy has been the cause of much blundering in the 
past, blundering that a little previous co-operation might have 
obviated. In time of war the army and navy must act cojointly. 
They should do so in the peace maneuvres. If the Federal au- 
thorities have any gumption they will direct that the army and 
navy conduct their maneuvres simultaneously and in co-opera- 
tion. Only by this means can the actual conditions of war be i di- 
rectly simulated. Petty jealousies of rival services and their 
officers should be eliminated for the common good of the people 
of the nation. 

* * * 

An authoritative definition of the duty of a unionist toward 
his employer appears in a late issue of the Xew Zealand Times. 
A speaker at the Trades Union Hall is quoted as saying: "It is 
the duty of every man to get as much wages for as little Work as 



possible." This damning indictment of the guiding principle of 
unionism as it is to-day, if it were pronounced by an opponent, 
would be denied by most unionists. We do not believe it is ac- 
cepted as an article of the faith by the more reputable members 
of the trades unions. According fo this dictum, the ideal union- 
ist is the individual who can shirk as much as possible bis duty, 
who — lacking the nerve of the highwayman — appropriates money 
not his own by overawing his employer with the club of organized 
labor. The worker who makes such a principle the maxim of 
his conduct is condemned already to be a hopeless malcontent and 

drudge throughout his career. 

* * * 

In the recent Thompson divorce case, it was alleged by the fair 
plaintiff that her lord and master frequently came home in a 
hilarious condition. A specific instance was desired, and the 
lady slated that on one occasion the defendant arrjved and de- 
liberately sat down upon some "lady fingers." and other pastry. 
As a certain sea captain was momentarily expected to dinner, 
this occurrence created consternation in the household. The 
lady-fingers, however, in parlance of the fighters, while "disfig- 
ured, were still in the ring," and accordingly did duty that even- 
ing. Such episodes produce the grist which keep our divorce 
courts busy. 

* * * 

The English suffragettes are certainly strenuous in their 
methods. Being denied admission to the Houses of Parliament, 
they have taken to balloons, on which are inscribed in gigantic 
letters, "Vote for Women." Others devote their time to chalking 
their opinions on the sidewalks, while steamers on the Thames 
are liberally placarded with banners expressing their sentiments. 
The London policeman is having the time of his life, silencing 
fair orators who bawl through megaphones in the public squares, 
and no one seems to know where the agitation will stop. 

* * * 

The Rev. William D. Ronden Pos. deposed pastor of the 

Church of Xew Jerusalem, insists that he is not a bigamist in the 
eyes of the law, merely because he has married a second time. 
His quondam parishioners assert that they care nothing for the 
interpretation of the human law. They pin their accusations by 
the thesis of the Divine law. and claim that judged thus, the 
minister is a bigamist indeed. We give it up. As a general 
proposition, however, it would seem pretty safe to fie bound by the 
code of the law of the land in which church members live and 
move and have their being. 

* * * 

The familiar form of expeetorator Bradbury will not be in 
evidence on the streets of the city for a year to come. The aged 
millionaire, who has seemed to court litigation, has been sen- 
tenced to serve twelve months in the State Prison for perjury. 
In his seventy-third, year, possessing a splendid country estate 



©/©J^7 


w 


n¥&. 


Large reductions 


on 


Summer 


Apparel in every 


Department. 


Garments which 


are 


specially 


adapted for vacation and out- 


ing wear. 






GRANT AVENUE AND 


GEARY ST. 



.It i.v in, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



and drawing a large income from his city properties, the law 
condemns him to wear a convict's stripes; owing to his in- 
satiable desire to domineer and control his financially weaker 
Marin County neighbors. 

* * * 

A Loaded cigar is held responsible for a "near" breach in the 
family of Frank C. Havens, of Piedmont, shattering the mutual 

trust between the capitalist and his son Harold, and furthel 
threatening the ties of an outside friendship and undermining ,-> 
business deal. The story is this: 

Havens pere has a predilection for a particular brand of cigar 
and, as befits a gentleman of quality, an hospitable entertainer 
and an appreciative smoker, keeps on hand at his home at all 
times, a plentiful supply of the fragrant weed. All of which has 
been kept no secret from the younger Havens, though it was 
not known that he knew so thoroughly where the supply was kept. 
Havens, Sr., genially tendered one of his cigars to his head 
gardener, while looking over his residence park, the other day, 
and in return the gardener gave his employer an interesting 
course of instruction in the noble art of "loading" a cigar ac- 
cording to a tried and proved method. Havens experimented 
with several of the articles of his supply, and then thoughtlessly 
replaced them with the rest, and immediately forgot the whole 
matter. Havens, Jr., soon after stopping at his father's home 
en route to town to discuss a business deal with another well- 
known capitalist, helped himself to his father's cigars. The deal 
was to be discussed at a down-towp. cafe, and afterward Havens 
and his guest were to proceed to some social affair. Both, there- 
fore,- were in evening garb. After the meal, Havens tendered 
a cigar with due recommendation of the superiority of that 
particular brand, and just as his guest raised a re-filled glass 
of wine to his lips, Havens lighted his weed. The incidents fol- 
lowing are described as being numerous, brief and spectacular. 
A display of pyrotechnics from the Havens side of the bible was 
followed by the utter baptism of his guest with the sparkling 
wine and fire-works. Business was utterly routed in the retreat 
to replace linen and stained Tuxedo. Whereby, it is said, is the 
reason one of the big business deals of the week was mil pulled 
off as expected. While Havens, Sr., is undeniably justified in 
the opinion that the laugh is his, the younger Havens' guesl is 
equally sure that the wine was on him, though the blow-out was 
supposed to be Harold's. The gardener, having succeeded in 

planting the seed of mistrust, refuses to i>e interviewed. 

* * * 

The new "slot machines." designed to provide a quarl of 

fresh milk every day tor the babies in charge of ihe Associated 
Charities, can safely he patronized by everybody. No more wor- 
thy charity was ever instituted than ibis, am! if a one-thousandth 
pari of the money recklessly thrown aua\ In the Bends ran be 
collected, manj an infant life will In' saved, and many a weakling 

baby grow up a strong, healthy child. 

* * * 

Sam Shortridge, the silver-tongued orator, was interrupt 
a man al the Cliff House opening last week. The California 
Demosthenes was the victor in the verbal encounter. When Mr. 
Jerome, of New York, at the very climax of an impassioned trib- 
ute in ihe view afforded from the hostelry by Shortridge, averred 
thai Conej Island discounted it, Sam quickly replied thai the 
visitor came from Hell Gate, while San Frani iscans bail from the 
Golden Gate. Which retort silenced the New Yorker. 



— Ladles, when you're shopping and grow hungry, don't you know. 
Swain's Is quite convenient, and 'tis there you ought to go; 
The pastry Is delicious, and the meats and wines are fine — 
Swain's for hungry people is the place where they should dine! 
Swain's Restaurant. Van Ness avenue, near Sutter. 



Rockaway Beach 



SAN MATEO CO. 



FOR SALE AT A SACRIFICE 

5 CHOICE LOTS FOR $750 CASH 



Apply room 16, San Francisco News Letter. 
773 Market Street. San Francisco 



Pears' 

The public's choice since 1789. 

"Your cheeks are 
peaches," he cried. 

"No, they are 
Pears'," she replied. 

Pears' Soap 
brings the color of 
health to the skin. 

It is the finest 
toilet soap in all 
the world. 




New York K^MJji/f/IjfJ/fAtfr Paris 

//vc vonoa* reo 
New Location 139-143 Geary Street, between Grant Ave. and Stockton 



Phenomenal Sale of Waists 
at $4.95— $6.95 

Embroidered Chiffon, Lace Net, Applique 
Lingerie, Messaline. in black and all 
colors, at one-half and less than one-half 
their regular value. 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 



OFFICE OF THE I HISERXIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, corner 
Market. McAIUstei Jones tated Savings 

Banks of San Fran . 1:10:1. At :i meeting of 

the Board of Directors <>' this society, bold this day, a dividend has been 
1 and eight-tenths (3 8-10] tier an- 

num ..ti alt deposits for the six tnon res from 

ill taxes, Mini payable on and after July 1. 1909; dividends not drawn will 
be added to depositors' accounts, and become a part thereof, and will earn 
dividend from July 1. 1909; deposits made on or before July 10. 190 
draw interest from July 1. 1909. 

R. M. TOBIN. Secretary. 

THE CONTINENTAL B: ILl'lNO AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, junction 
of Golden Gate avenue. Taylor and Market Sts.. San Francisco. Cat., will 
on July 1. 1909, pay the usual Interest of six (6> per cent per annum on 
time deposits or class C stock, four 1 4) pel uinum on ordinary 

or class D stock. The ordinary deposits, if not withdrawn, 

will be added to the prii. thereafter draw interest at the same 

rata WASHINGTON DODGE, President; WILLIAM CORBIN. Secretary. 

CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA, Market and Sansome 
streets. Branches, 624 Van Ness avenue and 3039 Sixteenth St. For the 
half year ending Jul i dividend has been declared on deposits in 

the ravines department of this bank at the rate of four (4) per <:■ 
annum, free of al! ible on and after Thursday. July I 

Dividends not are added to and bear the same rate of interest 

as the principal from July 1. 1909. 

E. G. TOGNAZZI. Manager. 

FRENCH SAVINGS BANK. 101 Sutter street.— For the half year ending 
June 30, .i.l.n.l has the rate of four 

cent per onnun :) and after Thurs- 

day. July 1. 190:*. Dividends not called foi 1 to and bear the 

same rate of interest as the principal from July 1. 1909. 

CHARLES CARPT. President. 

Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty little booklet of exquisitely perfumed powdered leaves to 
carry In the purse. A handy article for all occasions to quiclcly Im- 
prove the complexion. Sent for 5 Cents in stamps or coin. F. T. 
Hopkins. 37 Great Jones St.. N. T. 



San F: 



rancisco 



News Letter 



July 10, 1909 




When the broad-minded and intelligent policy was 

adopted of recognizing the necessary social evil and confining 
it to a certain isolated district, sensible men approved. It meant 
the removal of the Jezebels to a section of their own, like the 
Yoshiwara of Japan and the Hooker's Division of Washington. 
D. C. But the present city Government has deceived us in this 
as in other things. Their laudable step has not been sincere, 
for notorious houses of prostitution are permitted to run 
brazenly, without any kind of interference, right in the heart of 
the business and residential sections. For example, the houses 
of the unspeakable Tessie Wall, Roma Graham and Jessie Hay- 
man are running full blast on streets frequented daily by hun- 
dreds of decent women, children and young girls. They are over 
a mile away from the loudly proclaimed "dead line" of the social 
evil. Who permits this? Why are these strumpets favored, 
and others driven to the Barbary Coast? What is their "pull," 
and upon whom do they exert it ? 

Among the many silly things done by newspapers, one 

of the most tiresome is this thing of constantly attaching to some 
ordinary article by a staff writer a portrait of said writer. It 
becomes absolutely ridiculous when the article has as its subject 
a world-wide celebrity. Rev. Thomas B. Gregory will rehash 
from a column of biography a mess of six inches of words. To 
offset the dreariness of the text, it might be a good thing to run 
a portrait of said celebrity with the reverend gentleman's effu- 
sion. But instead, we are confronted, for the seventh time with- 
in a month, by a picture of the Reverend Thomas. In the first 
place, no one cares what he looks like; in the second, his smug 
face has been presented to the readers week after week for many 
a dreary month. It becomes farcical. I mention Gregory's name 
simply because it happens to be the first one to occur to me. 
There are plenty of others of whom we weary. It is time to 
drop this senseless fad. But the trouble is, that when news- 
papers drop a fad they take up a worse one. 

Charles Kaiser, a full-blooded Indian, was hanged last 

week in Carson City for the murder of his wife. The crime 
was committed but three months ago, and the aborigine, in 
imitation of his associates in crime. Thaw, Hains, et al., justified 
the murder on the plea of the "unwritten law." Unlike those fel- 
low criminals, however, he was unable to employ the best legal 
talent, was not possessed of means to hire alienists to confuse 
the jury, or to appeal to powerful friends. In a word, he was 
but a poor, friendless Indian, who had the additional plea that 
it has been the custom since time immemorial to avenge such 
crimes with death at the hands of the injured one among his 
tribesmen. Nevertheless, justice in this case moved with British 
celerity, which is in itself very commendable. To the casual 
reader, however, the impression created by the continued ex- 
istence in detention, with every prospect of early release, of 
wealthy Caucasian criminals, convicted of similar offenses, is 
somewhat distasteful. 

The absurdity of permitting the landsmen of the United 

States Coast and Geodetic Survey to make the charts and sailing 
directions for the use of mariners is evidenced by just two little 
incidents which occurred upon this coast after the naval officers 
were withdrawn from this highly technical work, which they had 
so ably conducted for years. One of the high officials of the Coast 
Survey, a landsman, of course, told a subordinate, in so many 
words, that "the hydrography is of no importance; the topogra- 
phy is what must be attended to." In other words, the land 
must be surveyed before the water; the little streams and pretty 
rooks and things before the path of the mariner. The other in- 
cident was when the landsmen surveyors produced a chart of the 
Hawaiian islands, with the latitude and longitude scales omitted. 
as well as an island! Yet these people are trying might and 
main, right now, to secure a complete monopoly of all the litera- 
ture for the benefit of seamen. 



Beware of the dog hospital. If you have a valuable dog, 

or one that you are fond of, it is better to have him treated, if 
sick, at home or in solitude at a regular kennel. If you wish 
to have him boarded, send him to the country or to a private 
house. For the majority of so-called dog hospitals are prolific 
breeding places of contagious canine diseases. Many dogs, of 
many breeds, of many ailments, are herded together in them, 
breathing the same atmosphere, and new-comers are often placed 
in boxes vacated by diseased dogs, without proper disinfection. 

If you should nevertheless determine to send your dog to a 
hospital, satisfy yourself that it is one where he can enter quar- 
ters that are isolated and have been disinfected. Better yet, if 
he is merely to be boarded, send him to a private or public ken- 
nel where no diseased dogs are taken. Otherwise you may lose 
him. 

In their efforts to bring the Japanese strikers to terms, the 

Hawaiian plantation owners are again importing labor from 
Porto Rico. The Paradise of the Pacific, in the commingling 
of the various races of the earth, is far in -the lead of any other 
portion of the globe. In the effort to procure efficient labor, the 
temperate and torrid zones have been scoured. Russians, Ital- 
ians, Portuguese, Filipinos, Japanese, Chinese and numerous 
others, work alongside the Hawaiian, while Americans, English 
and Hermans are much in evidence, mostly in positions requiring 
executive ability. In no tropical country is such wages paid as in 
Hawaii. In no other tropical country is the condition of the 
worker more safeguarded. When it is remembered that these 
striking Japanese were glad to work for fifteen cents a day at 
home, as against ninety cents in Hawaii, sympathy cannot be 
extended them. 

Enshrouded in a living tomb for ages, some strange crea- 
tures resembling frogs were dug out of a sandstone quarry near 
Denver last week. Local palaentologists are of the opinion that 
the reptiles have existed since the time, aeons ago, when the sand- 
stone was a beach on some primeval ocean or lake. This is very 
interesting. It is also interesting to note that there is a type of 
man, not uncommon, who resembles markedly these survivors of a 
past era. I mean the species of homo sapiens who, having eyes, 
see not, and being endowed with ears hear not; in short, the in- 
dividuals who, existing at this marvelous period of the world's 
history, are utterly indifferent to the tide of progress. Most of 
these own unimproved real estate in San Francisco, while many 
have offices on Sansome street. 

The claim that the Japanese are cheap wo'rkers is not 

founded on fact. During a recent visit to the country, my host, 
during a discussion of the help problem, informed me that he 
was compelled to pay forty dollars a month and found to his 
Japanese cook, while expert white gardeners were to be hired for 
thirty-five. The newly-arrived Oriental may for the time, as does 
the white emigrant, work for low wages till he gets his "bear- 
ings," but he is quick to perceive the possibilities and chances of 
securing high wages, and is an expert in the principles of union- 
ism. 




■ fl YOU will buy a piano 

^T of us, of any make, we 

I I will agree to exchange 

I I it for a Steinway at any 

■ ■ time within three years, 

■ I allowing you on the 
I ■ Steinway every dollar 

you have paid upon the 
other instrument. 

You'll ultimately want a 
Steinway, so you better get 
your temporary piano where 
you won't lose anything on it 
when you get ready to trade 
it in for a Steinway. 

Sherman Ray & Go. 

STEINWAY AND OTHER PIANOS 

Victor Talking Machines 

Kearny and Sutter Streets, S. F. 

Clay, at 14th St., Oakland, Cal. 



July 10, 1909 



and California "Advertiser 



3Faurtt>tm PrpBuVntB lefor? Hasljtngton 



Vim captious one before the camp-fire, where discussions are 
easiest to provoke, and arguments entertainingly round out the 
linn 1 till weariness prompts retreat to blankets and cot, express re- 
gret that though "First in war, first in peace and first in the 
hearts of his countrymen," Washington was miles away from be- 
ing the first president. Of course a protest, a long one and a loud 
one, will go up. Just as when the fame of originality was shorn 
from the Immortal Act of Independence by the unearthing of 
another document of similar import given to the world at Penn- 
sylvania, two years previous to the adoption of the one we hold 
dear to our hearts. But to dethrone George Washington from 
his place on the pedestal alloted to our first President is a sac- 
rilege to the average patriot, and he had not a few predecessors 
in that exalted place. In 1774, when the American colonies de- 
clared themselyes in favor of a Republic, and a complete separa- 
tion from the mother country, a de facto Government assuming 
all the powers of Government was organized by the accredited 
representatives of the several colonies which assembled, and has 
since been termed by the historian as the Continental Congress. 
It was not until 1789 that George Washington took office under 
the Federal Constitution, and between that time and 1774 is an 
interval of fifteen years, when all the forms of Government were 
present, treaties made with foreign countries, ambassadors ac- 
credited to friendly powers, armies maintained and Washington 
himself commissioned and given command over the country's 
battalions. The exercise of such powers are executive and bind- 
ing. From 1774 to the inauguration of George Washington 
there were no less than fourteen Presidents, who, under I lie 
conditions then prevailing, were the presiding officers of Con- 
gress. 

Peyton Randolph, of Virginia, was the first President. He 
was elected in September, 1771. but in consequence of ill-health 
he resigned a month later to he succeeded by Henry Middlton, 
of South Carolina. In the reorganization of Congress, May 10. 
1775, Peyton Randolph wbb re-elected President, but having been 
chosen Bpeaker of tin' Virginia House of Burgesses, he retired 

in favor of John Hancock. The latter was President of the fam- 
ous Congress that adopted the Declaration of Independence, and 
in October, 1777, he retired to return to Massachusetts. Henry 
Laurens held the office for one month, when he vras commissioned 
minister lo Holland, but was captured en route to his destina- 
tion by the British and held as a rebel prisoner in the Tov 
of London for fifteen months. 

John Jay. of New Vork. who became first Chief Justice of the 
United Slates. I I mm n- :in,| retired upon being ap- 

pointed minister to Spain in L779 Samoa] Huntington, one 
of the signers and hailing from Connecticut, began his term 
President September 88, 1779, and continued until July 10, 
1781, when be w:n succeeded by Thomas McKean of Pennsyl- 
vania, though be represented Delaware in Congress. On Novem- 
ber . r '. 1781, he was succeeded bv John Hanson, and a year later 
Hanson was displaced by Flias Boudinot. Almost a year after, 
lacking one month, General Thomas Mifflin, of Pennsylvania, 
came into the office, and continued therein until Novembei 

1784. Then cams Richard Henry Lee, of the famous Virginian 
lee family. Nearly two years later he was succeeded by Nathan- 
iel Gorham, of Massachusetts, His term lasted eight mom':'. 

until February 2. 1:87. when Genera] Arthur St. Clair of Penn- 
sylvania .ame into power. His term expired in January. 1788, 
and Cyrus Griffen, a Virginian, was elected his successor. He 
continued until Washington was inaugurated. In all. there « 
fourteen Presidents before Washington. The revolutionists be- 
lieved in rotation in office, and in the theory of the new broom 
sweeping clean. Then there were jealousies to placate, and the ' 
rebellious colonies were all favored by permitting their son- 
swing the gavel, exercise supreme power and — step down. Q 
ernmenl by the people was a toy — suspicion was rife, and i: 
not until the Briton was banished that definite policies were 
tinned and given Constitutional effect. Anyhow, the arsrument 
that Washington was not the firs! President, but the fifteenth. 
bears the authenticity of record, and has the aeknowledgmer. ■ 
of law. 



Announcement 



The Tozer Co. 



beg to announce that they 
are now permanently loca- 
ted at 228 Grant Ave. Next to 
White House. Second floor. 



Fine Wall Papers, Draperies, and Interior 
Decorating 

Telephone Douglas 1869 



R. Bujannoff 

MANUFACTURING JEWELER 

AND 

DIAMOND SETTER 

51 LICK PL ACE. off Suiter, between Kearny and Montgomery 




Phone. Donrlis 1833. 



Goodyear "Hippo" Hose 




Best and strongest Garden Hose 
Stand 600 lbs. pressure. Any length 

Goodyear Rubber Company 

R. H. PEASE. President. 

587. 589. 591 Market Street 



A. W. Betft 



Best's Art School 



1628 Bush Street 



Life Classes 
Day and Nieht 



Alice Betft 



Illustrating 
Sketching 

Paint iner 



White Diamond Water Co. 



Pure Water for Oakland 
Alameda 

Incorporated Berkeley 

An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 

treated, but bacteriologically purified by electrical process 6 gallons 

DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK. »1 50 per month. Single 6 gallon 

bottle. 60 cents. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 4192. 
980 45lh Street Oakland. Cal. 



MAYERLES GERMAN EYEWATER IS 

a firnpli and parted]* harmless- Ere Rtoirfj. fcr children »iH 
•dalta 

V POLICE San fraan .-.«•-■■ — M (trM «• fraat plea-- 
ar* to nmnnu4 to tha public Mr. Georf* Malaria of HO Market M 
Saa 1'r.nn.f.. I hat* tx-ea aim* glateee far ih- p»«1 lw«I«« fun 
ind dir'Dt that lam* h»T» eooanlted **'-r»l opticians bat tot oniti I 
bad fDoanlU t Mr > ■*■ re Ma*erle and had him flt claaeea In m ; a *#e 
■» | retpactfttlij. 
J H aMDEMSOM. Saraaaat of I 
IT IS MaRTKLOrS TL* rfert wi Ma>erl«'i Ey» Water ha. haaa 
■mil tlnae aad I •hull r«**-mm*nd it a* the pear of all -re raaaadiaa 
Ta*an truly. T IKLLT. alanada County BoapttaJ. Sa* Laaadra. Cat. 

WCUI * C raa ' CUC umtaliM of Op*.ca . MO Market Siraa*. »*•«**• Hale'. 




I SSTt. San Fr&ad 



MlTSftLES atRxa* eti wim. By * 



Union Lumber Company 

Redwood and Pine Lumber 

Redwood Ties. Telegraph Poles. Shingles. Split Shakes. Etc. 

Main Office— Crocker Bldg.. San Francisco 

Yards and Planing Mills— Sixth and Channel Sts.. Saw Francisco 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1909 



(tarns- A peasant (©ttftnor Bpavt 



Lawn tennis is in big vogue this season. It is the game that 
confers health and finds expression of its virtues in grace of 
movement, lightness of step, brigthness of the eye, lithesomeness 
of form, and blush on the cheeks. A man may be married and 
love his' wife, but the girl with the racket is the real poultry in 
his eye — and all other eyes that men of any and all conditions 
see through. Li wn tennis will do more for its votaries than the 
most extolled patent medicine promise? to — and don't do. The 
girl who swings a racket is easily identified among her fellows. 
She is healthy and fascinating, and has sparkle and go. Tin- 
young man who keeps her company on the court is always worth 
his salary, and a frequent increase which he usually gets without 
praying for it. 

fhetennis player is immune to indigestion, dyspepsia and 
other ailments that make those who have them cantankerous, 
sallow-faced and anxious to get into wings to get rid of their 
stomachs and digestive apparatus. 

The philosophies of Horace Fletcher and the prescriptions of 
the physician find no application around the vicinity of a tennis 
court. 

As a game, it excels golf in that it does not exact too much 
physical strain. It is as far above croquet as the bean bag is re- 
mote from baseball. Tennis has settled down to stay and stick 
as the royal sport of those who yearn to be happy and healthy. 

It is plaved by two persons on a single court, and where three 
or four players participate a double court is required. 

The single and double courts are easily constructed and at 
little outlay. The principal requirement is that the ground upon 
which the court is placed is level and well rolled. A well-sodded 
area will suffice for home and practice purposes, or bare, hard 
ground will do. Some put on a top dressing of macadam rock 
and roll it into the soil, while the asphalt paved court has of re- 
cent seasons come to the fore with star players. 

The divisions are marked off in white-wash or chalk. If 
permanency is desired, a mixture of cement and marble dust 
will endure through several seasons. 

The dimensions of the single court, as outlined in the diagram, 
are as follows : 

Length of court, 78 feet ; width of court, 27 feet ; from net 
to service line. 21 feet; height of net in center, 3 feet; height of 
net at sides, 3Vo feet. 



Post 







Service 

Net 


Line 
Net 


Service 


Line 









Base- 


Line 












Service 
Net 


Line 
Net 




Service 


Line 









Post 



Base Line 

Diagram of 
Single Court 



Diagram of 
Double Court 



The dimensions of the double court are the same as for the 
single court, except that 4% feet are added to each side of the 
court between sides and service lines. The netting is stretched 
from posts set outside of the side lines. It can be purchased 
from any dry-goods store or sporting goods house. 

The pleasures of the game are enhanced by enclosing the 
court with closely woven wire, such as is used to fence in young 
chicks, carried to a height of ten feet, fastened to posts set in the 
ground, at varying intervals. This prevents the balls from 
straying into the street and neighboring yards, and obviates a 
hunt for them. 

However, a beginning may be made without going to this ex- 
pense, and the game will be as enjoyable if the mesh fencing is 
not at hand or beyond the means. 

The two other requirements of the game are the balls, made of 
hollow rubber, covered with cloth, and the raquets, of elliptical 



hoops of bent wood, over which catgut is stretched and set in 
handles. These are to be had at stores dealing in sporting goods 
and toys. 

The game is played by striking a ball to and fro with the 
rackets over the netting or net stretched across the center of the 
court. 

In single or two-handed tennis the players decide by lot which 
shall play first and on what side of the net each shall play. One 
side of the racket is rough and the other smooth, and the choice 
is usually made by one of the players taking a racket and saying 
to the other, "Rough or smooth?" He then throws the racket 
into the air, and if it falls with the side uppermost which the 
other has designated, then his opponent has the choice of turns, 
or sides, as the case may be. Thus, if the winner of the toss-up 
decides to take the first turn, then the other has the choice of 
courts. 

These points having been decided, the player who has the first 
turn takes his position on the base line of his side of the court, 
while his opponent stands where he pleases on his side of the net. 
The player then takes the ball, tosses it up and strikes it over 
the net into the court next to the net. This is called serving 
and the player is called the server. The other player is called 
the striker-out, and his business is to catch the ball on his racket 
after its first bound and return it to the server. The ball is 
then tossed back and forth across the net until it does not fall 
within the court or cannot be returned, and the one opposed 
to the player failing to return the ball scores a point. 

In beginning a game the first failure to serve a ball does not 
count. If the ball does not go over the net or falls in the wrong 
court, then it is called a fault, and the server must try again. 
The second failure is called doubles, and the striker-out scores a 
point. 

When two faults are made or either side fails to return the 
ball properly, then another service must be played, but this time 
the server must serve the ball from the left of his service line 
into the court next to the net on his right, his opponent also 
changing his position so as to receive the service. The same 
player serves every time until the end of the game, alternately 
serving the ball first from one rear court and then from the other 
until one or the other wins the game. In the beginning of the 
game, the first service must always be from the right court. In 
the second game the one who was striker-out serves the ball, and 
thus they change about until they have finished playing. When 
a player has won six games he has won a "set," and the play be- 
gins over again. 

The points scored are called respectively fifteen, thirty, forty, 
deuce, vantage, and game. When a player has not won a point 
his score is called "love." The progress of the game is called out 
as it is played, by first calling the server's score and then the 
striker-out's. Thus. "Thirty-Love" would mean that the server 
has thirty points while the striker-out had nothing. "Fifteen- 
Thirty" would mean that the server had fifteen points and tin- 
striker-out thirty. "Love-AU" would mean that neither side 
had won a point, while "Forty-All" would mean that each had 
forty. The one whose score is forty, if he wins next point, wins 
the game, but if the game stands "Forty-All," meaning that both 
have forty, then the score is called "Deuce," and the one who 



.5? 



Boord's Twilight 

THE PERFECTION OF DRY GINS 

OLD TOM 

DRY (square bottle) and 
SLOE GINS 
ORANGE BITTERS 



ALL "CAT ON BARREL" BRAND 
FROM 

BOORD & SON 

London, England 

Charles Meineeke & Co. 

Agents Pacific CoasT; San Francisco 



July 10, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



11 



wins the next point does not score game, but instead scores "Van- 
tage." If the player winning "Vantage" wins the next point, 
then he scores the game. When the server has the vantage it is 
called "Vantage-in," and when the striker-out has the vantage'it 
is called "Vantage-Out." 

Lawn tennis, like ail other games, has terms and phrases 
peculiar to itself, which are replete with meaning to the player. 
They are as follows: 

Base line. The line at either end of the court. 

Court. The level place laid out for the playing of the game, 
and also the subdivisions of the ground so marked. 

Cut. To strike the ball so that it will whirl and bound ir- 
regularly. 

Deuce. The score when each side has made three points and 
the score is "Forty-All," and resumed whenever there is a tie 
thereafter, until one of the players scores game by winning two 
successive points following each tie. 

Doubles. Two successive faults; also games between two pairs 
of players. 

Fault. A failure by the server to drive the ball into the proper 
part of his opponent's court. 

Fifteen. One point score. So called because in old court 
tennis the numbers up to fourteen being used to designate the 
chases, could not be employed in announcing the score. 

Forty. Three points scored. 

Game. The number of points that must be scored to win a 
match. 

Let. A stroke in which the ball, especially in serving, touches 
the net as it passes over. 

Love. The term used for the score of the side who has won 
no points. 

Love-All. The term used when neither side has scored a point. 

Net. The loose meshed material stretched across the center 
of the court to divide it into two sections. 

Net-pole. The pole to which the ends of the net are fastened 
to hold it in position. 

Return. The batting, playing, or directing the ball back over 
the net. 

Serve. To put a ball in play by throwing or driving it to a 
player on the opposite side of the game. 



THE NOISELESS Gf.X. 
Sic transit gloria meindi. War has been shorn of its noise. 
The roaring of the lion has been transformed into tin' <! 
stealth of the panther. A simple yet effective &e\ ii e, the inven- 
tion of Hiram Percy Maxim, has done all this — and set the 
agog. It is a cylinder or chamber five or six inches in length 
and two inches in diameter, the interior of which coni 
coil of wire. The device fits around the muzzle of the rift 
consumes both noise and smoke. More wonderful still, it 
the "kick'" or recoil of the weapon at firing. To the huntsman 
and those at target practice it is heaven Bent The extraction of 
the noise spares the drum of the ear. an the shoulder 

I'rmii the stiffness ami lameness that follow steady shooting. It 

increases the '-lie, tiveneflS of war and i rs- -to thus 

hasten the day when such savagery among 

have us Betting. \l an exhibition given in this city by Mr. 
Phil B. Bekeart, one of the leading stockholders having control 
of the invention, the Maxim silencer met every qualification it is 
pledged to possess. Noise, recoil and smoke were eliminated. 
The deafening (•porl oi a large calibre riile without the 
was followed by the slight ping of the speeding bullet, and the 
almost imperceptible snap 01 the hammer as it struck the metallic 
cartridge. The absence of recoil was noticeable. Vet the world 
is divided into two camps as to the "morals" of this new device, 
or those involved in its introduction into general use. It is 
it will make the trade of assassination easier to practice 
and more difficult to detect. Vet a- i oa are frequently 

committed by the knife to which no warning \\!iis;i, - 
or the black-jack without a gong. That it will grow into 
in the sporting world is undoubted. As to war. 

-. and wh( i jo into 

ethoda and means that effect results and attain the end more 
certainly and the quickest will always be in vogues — desp 
gumenta before and after. Mr. Bekeart is to be congratulal 
the success of the invention in which he is 



WEDDING PRESENTS 
The choii -elect from at 

fornia ami Polk :t Fairmont Hotel. 




THE BE C T PART OF THE SHAVE 
IS WHEN YOU COME TO 

Pond's Extract 

Relieves Irritation 

Prevents Inflammation 

Assures Comfort 

Used by men of discrimination 
everywhere, Sold only in Bealed 
bottles— never in bulk. Write 
for intrrrstinc booklet on shav- 
inp.— mailed free on request. 

I.aniont. O.rTiss Sc Co. . 78 Hudson St. 
Sole Agents, New York 



^-.v^' /i 


Phone 


Franklin 2803 


<fy°ki£ 


^y Art and Refine- 
^^ m e n t are Dis- 
played by Taste- 
ful Attire 


y (y^ 


-MAKERS 0F-- 


LADIES* GOWNS and FANCY 

1321 SUTTER STREET. New Van Ness Ave. 


COSTUMES 

San Francisco. Cat. 



ALFRED BANNISTER 

ACCOUNTANT AND AUDITOR 



1424 Post Street 
Public Expert 



San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 2871 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone, Douglas 4300 



MAKER OF HIGH GRADE CUSTOM SHOES FOR 
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 




E.Ubiilh.4 ISM 

Coachmen's and Riding: Boots a Specialty 
2839 California St., San Francisco Telephone West 5431 



(JO A I To Housekeepers 



Please remember when ordering your coal, if you want the 
GENUNE CLEAN RICHMOND COAL at wholesale prices 



and full weight, you must order from or through us. We 
deliver in any part of the city or country in sacks or in bulk. 



J.J. 



\l O r f n BS-ZB PINE STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 

luUUlt? W. \jU. Pkoaa Kearay 4tf tad Kearey 465 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1909 



3Flptrtj?rtztng mb 3lts Attttjor 



A new word has been given to language. It is Fletcherizing. 
and its author at present fills the public eye. It is not a fad or 
fancy or passing movement. It is a gospel of the dietary that all 
may follow at reduction in the cost of living and live the longer. 
The creed is simple. It is "eat slowly," and enjoins the perfect 
mastication of every morsel of food. It was given to the world 
twelve years ago by Horace Fletcher, once of San Francisco, but 
who now divides his home between New York and Venice of the 
Adriatic. A physical wreck, from indigestion and kindred ills, 
the despair of physicians and for whom the Spas of Europe and 
the compounds of the pharmacopoeia held forth no magic of relief 
the apostle of this new faith in dietary submitted himself to his 
own experiment. By leaps and bounds hte returned to normal 
health, and though at the age of sixty years, his skin is as pink 
as that of a child, his step is as elastic, nerves as strong and vigor 
as vital as those of the normal at thirty. His own remedy was 
"eat slowly" and "masticate perfectly." To Fletcherize, as the 
world now calls it, is the antithesis of "to gourmandize," the ban 
of present day life. Ignorantly, all men eat too much. The 
promptings of hunger and pressure of business impel them to 
eat hurriedly and hastily. The mouth that was given, not as a 
chute only to convey the food lo the stomach, has a mechanical 
purpose. It is intended to reduce food to a pulp before being 
submitted to the chemical and digestive processes of the stom- 
ach. Moderns, however, in their haste and hurry, pile in the full 
of food, and task the stomach with the duty of both mastication 
and digestion. It is a violation of the laws of nature, and an 
unjust taxing of the physical powers. The violation of these 
canons merits the punishment that comes in the form of diges- 
tion, billiousness, dyspepsia, kidney diseases and a train of other 
maladies. 

The penalty is pain, unhappy lives and shortened time on 
earth. Fletcherizing is a truth; therefore is as old as creation it- 
self, for truth always was, is and will be, but it is forgotten and 
lies dormant, to be awakened by necessity, and the world accepts 
it again just as it has the doctrine of Horace Fletcher. Fletcher- 
izing has been translated into a score of tongues. The highest 
medical authorities acclaim its value and it costs nothing. Its 
rules are simple, almost childish. It proscribes no particular 
dietary, and is only difficult at first to the habitual bolter of food. 
It does not declare for temperance, and places no ban on tobacco. 
It does not place anathema on the cucumber, hot cake or oyster 
loaf. Condensed, and without the necessity of reading volumes, 
it requires no prescription to be filled at the pharmacy, no phy- 
sician is needed, and summed up it is contained in the following 
five rules : 

1. Chew food thoroughly and until it swallows itself. 

2. Never eat unless hungry. 

3. Stop eating when the taste is satisfied. 

4. Sip all liquors, whether spirituous, malt or pure water. 

5. Trust the taste for the kind of food most suited. 

That is all there is to the canons of the new health creed as 
formulated by Horace Fletcher. Any one can practice them, 
and every one can abide by them. 

These canons are advocated by scientists and the world's most 
eminent physicians. They have been tried and have not failed. 
The Catholic clergy commend them to the institutions in their 
care; the Christian Endeavor has uplifted the banner of Fletcher- 
izing, and the famous Chatauqua has fallen into the procession. 
In Italy, France, Germany and Spain it has been accepted as a 
solution of the problem of living happily and well, and of econo- 
mizing to the extent of half the cost of food. 

This has all come as the result of an American, non-profes- 
sional, seeking to regain health, and having the brains and 
humanity to make known his discovery of a natural truth to 
others, that they might profit thereby and live the longer with 
fewer pains and at less cost. 

Horace Fletcher once had a store in San Francisco. He came 
here after visiting Japan, where the novelties made by the people 
there appealed to his eye and business acumen. He broughi 
over a large stock of fans, dolls, lanterns, dishware and trinkets, 
and profited. This induced him to enlarge the field for this spec- 
ial line of activity, and he established stores in Chicago, New 
York, New Orleans and other centers for the sale of Japanese 



goods and amassed millions. He retired to take life easier, and 
since then his hobby has been to uplift his fellow man by the 
simple ways. He started the "Don't Worry" movement, and 
organized it into clubs. "Eat Slowly" is the banner of his new 
crusade, and it has the sensible of the world in its trail. Fletcher 
stands for the simples of life, and history shows that they alone 
survive the ages and are of value to man. 



MOTHERS BE CAUTIOUS 
In selecting a food for the baby don't experiment. Baby can't stand 
much experimenting. Borden's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk Is acted 
upon by the infant stomach substantially the same as mother's milk 
For 50 years it has made glad mothers and started thousands of babies 
on life's Journey with health and happiness. 




New 

Poodle 

Dog 

Restaurant 

and 

Hotel 



N. W. Corner 

Polk & Post Sts. 

San Francisco 

Phone 

Franklin 2960 



For Oysters 
Moraghan's Restaurant 

26 Ellis Street 

Music during dinner. Open Sundays. 







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V ^A 


(&JkKJianiil(u<z> 


iBKi it tW i llll^r 




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The Leading Restaurant 




fl 


of San Francisco 

REGULAR DINNER $1.25 
or A la Carte 

342 Sutter Street San Francisco 







MAISON DOREE HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

151-157 ELLIS STREET, ABOVE POWELL. Up-to-date Establishment 
Lunch with wine 75c. Dinner with wine $1.25. Music every evening- 

Phone Ex. Douglas 1040 connecting all apartments 
Emilc Fonteiller, formerly with the Pup: Victor Laborie; John Dubourdieu, formerly with the 
Poodle Dog. 




JULT 10, 19t>9. 



and California Advertiser 



13 




PLMKE'SUND 




Ilk <>fyj»ttmJU J fJaxa<Tj-S./%^i 



By Barnett Franklin. 
"The Merry Widow" Trips Gloriously into Town. 

Her ladyship has come to town at last. These three years 
have we been awaiting her anil conjecturing. Echoes of '"The 
Merry Widow" music have reached us; we have waltzed a la 
Merry Widow; we have dined to the accompaniment of its musi- 
cal strains; we have had the barrel-organists grinding its merry 
melodies : — we have seen the hats. We have, in fact, been merry- 
widowized out here in the West to the fullest extent, barring 
an actual hearing of the operetta itself. 

Now she is with us for a' three weeks' visit, and it is up to the 
woolly Westerner to' affix the official seal of approval upon the 
judgments of his Eastern friends. We are prepared to wax 
quite as enthusiastic and get just as excited aud go into fully 
as many raptures over the beauties of this dainty Franz Lehai 
opera as they. In fact, we would just as lieve go them a couple 
better, in this matter of appreciation. And we are prepared to 
forgive the gentleman in the middle Hat next door who has been 
merrywidowwaltzing on a very squeaky cornet these past nine 
months with a daily regularity that may have been commendable 
from his viewpoint, but which was hardly appreciated from ours. 

Morning after morning, at the unholy hour of (i ::i0, has this 
persevering musician dallied with his favorite air, arousing us 
from our deepest slumbers, until we thought seriously of wander- 
ing away to some remote island of the South Seas where Merry 





,'. the fan 
Irphtum in 



George Osbourne, (he eminent tutu,-, trim »■/// siurcrd flrt»-<je 
Foster Piatt as stage director ai the Valencia Theatre. 

Widow waltzes are unknown — although we really doubt the actual 
nee of such a plan 1 . Often of a rosy morning we tnade un- 
gentle remark- to this neighbor of ours acros- the light court, bin 
he was never dissuaded. He scorned our frappeed and cutting 

-I chi nailing sardonically, continued to merrywidow- 

waltz on bis instrumenl of torture. Naught could stop him. A 

cheerfully welcomed the beheadi 
this human Bend, and j today we com- 

pletely ami freely tender him our forgiveness. The arrival of 
Widow" has caused the lacteal fluid of human 
kindness to once again flow in our veins. We are more 
charitable., 
"i'is a moi i '• this V i etta. Hoi 

thing equal to it in wealth of genuine 
i given us, and. as 10 the ["he Merrj 

Widow" is head and shoulders above that of "The Geisha." 

The most extravagant press reports have been vindicated, aud. 
■f us who have gone to the Van Xess Theatre these nigbts 
expecting much, have gotten all that and a little bit more. Such 
a delightful parcel of light musical entertainment as "The 
Merry Widow" looms out of tic >mic opera rot of the 

W years like a scintillating gem. It is in a class all by its 
lonely, as satisfying and delicious an affair as one would wish 
to have. 

And be it known, the famous waltz is not all there is of "The 
Merry Widow." There are melodic* upon melo make- 

up quite as happy. It is not a one-tune opera. Real music runs 
-'v throughout the action, mu- <■ and delirious. 

And "The Merrv Widow" is full of atmosphere. You b 
conscious of that fact in the intermissions, if you happen to 
step into Van N'.ss avenue t:e — or a ■ 

is mastical. You discover that composer and librettist have 
united gloriously toward the creating of a hypnotic Land-of- 
Make-Believe. Extravagant this may all sound, but I'll 
you won't find a dissenting verdict in the length and breadth of 
the citv. 

:i2 down to the plain, unpoetic facts, let it be recorded 

ellent first aid to Lehar through the 

of the verv "grand opera orchestra" he has sent with the 

company to interpret the gems of the composer. It is a band of 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1909 



musicians of the first water, under a very eloquent baton, and 
there is nary a flaw to find with this portion of the production. 
The company itself is not brilliant, but generally satisfactory, 
and anyway, this is a case of where "the play's the thing" with 
a vengeance. The widow herself is personated by Mabel Wilber, 
a young woman of presence, dash, and an acceptable singing 
voice. The main male character is in the hands of George Dam- 
eral, who is an accomplished dancer and quite a good actor. Dam- 
eral is also possessed of a personality that gets over the foot- 
lights magnetically, and so you forgive the fact that as a singist 
he is far from a conspicuous success. The dancing and costumery 
are particularly fine features of the production. From the prin- 
cipals to the gels of the merry-merry every one is admirably 
garbed, and they all minuet, two-step, waltz, and cut other weird 
shoe-shuffling capers at a great clip. 

Don't by any chance overlook the opportunity of making the 
acquaintance of "The Merry Widow" during her sojourn here. 

She is all that the heralds made her out to be. 
* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
"The Merry Widow" has been making a tremendous hit at the 
Van Ness Theatre, and crowded houses have been the rule in its 
opening week. The engagement of this world-famous operetta 
will be limited to two more weeks only. 
"The Merry Widow" is reviewed in an- 
other column. 

* * * 

"The Frisky Mrs. Johnson," a Clyde 
Fitch comedy, is announced as the Alca- 
zar's attraction the coming week. Flor- 
ence Roberts regards it as one of the bes 
vehicles in her repertoire. She starred in 
it one whole season, under Frederic Be- 
lasco's direction, and i; achieved quite a 
success. Tt affords her abundant oppor- 
tunity for a display of her best acting 
finalities, as comedy and emotional scenes 
alternate throughout the three acts. The 
situations are said to be very strong, (lie 
characterization is deftly drawn, and one 
of the climaxes has been pronounced the 
besi that Fitch ever conceived. 

All the scenes are laid in Paris, hut the 
principal people are Americans, with one 
Englishman prominent in the plot. Mrs. 
Johnson's married life lias not been ex- 
tremely happy, her husband having be- 
come enamored of and finally eloping with 
a chorus girl. The remainder of the play 
is devoted to straightening out the tai 
upon tangles that are created. Through 
an accidental episode, an admirer discov- 
ers tin' true worth id' [lie woman whom he 
had regarded as a soulless flirt, and of 
course he makes her his wife. 

Florence Eoberts is east as Mrs. John- 
son; Thurlow Bergen as the admirer, am! 
E. L. Bennison. Brnesl Glendinning, 
Louise Brownell, and the other favorites 
will appear. When the play was pre- 
sented in the old Alcazar about -i\ rear 
ago it scored a three-weeks' run. 

"Sapho" will he given for the last time 
I hi- Sunday night. 

* * * 

A genuine novelty will In- presented 
next week at the Orpheum in the shape of 
a one-act grand opera, entitled "The 
Patriot," by those well known writers of 
verse and music, Stanislaus Stange and 
Julian Edwards. Its action lake? placi 
during the American revolution. The 
principal feature of the cast will he Hel- 
ena Frederick, a gifted dramatic soprano 
of the most attractive appearance, and a 
graceful actress. Miss Frederick will be 
supported by Huntington May, Pacie Rip- 
ple, Fred Hanley, John Rogers, J. V. 
Prescott, James Wall and the old Tivoli 



favorite, William Schuster. Other attractions tor next week 
will be the Three Leightons, among the most popular comedians 
of the Orpheum Circuit : Selma Braatz, said to be the greatest 
of all European feminine jugglers ; and Charlotte Parry, a 
protean artist, who impersonates seven separate distinct charac- 
ters in a one-act play. Next week will conclude the engagements 
of the three Athletas, Armstrong and Clark, Ilerr Londe and 
Fraulein Tilly, and George Hillman and his Redpath Napanees. 

* * * 

The last performances of Broadhurst's highly hilarious farce, 
'"What Happened to Jones," will take place at the Valencia 
Theatre this Sunday afternoon and evening, and on Monday 
night "Mrs. Temple's Telegram," which has had the whole coun- 
try laughing for some time, will be given in capital style. The 
telegram around which the play revolves is one sent by Mrs. 
Temple to an address in a London suburb, given by her husband, 
when questioned by his wife, as that of his resting place of the 
night before. Naturally, she desires to know where Mr. Temple 
has been, and it happens that he cannot answer truthfully with- 
out inviting a row. The fact is, that he has been up in a Ferris 
wheel which has refused to revolve, and has left him hanging 
between earth and sky the whole night long. The predicament 
in itself might not be an unexplainablc one, were it not that 




George Dameral and Mabel Wilber in "The Merry Widow" at the Van Ness Theatre. 



July 10, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



15 



there was another occupant of the car — another lady — and Mrs. 
Temple is of a jealous temperament. 

Confessions, some willingly giveD and Borne forced, a few 
extra prevarications and a prodigious amount of side-stepping, 
finally bring about a happy ending to an unusually entertaining 
ami an exceedingly clean farce. Paul McAllister, who is as- 
lonishing his warmest admirers by his ability as a grnuine 
comedian, will have another strenuously funny part as Jack 
Tcni|>lc,-and Uobert Homans, Geo. Osbournc, Charles Dow Clark, 

Grace Travers, Edith Lyle and Peggy Monroe will appear. 

* * * 

The presentation for the first time in this country of Mas- 
cagni's opera, "L'Amico Fritz," has resulted in a glorious tri- 
umph for the International Grand Opera Company at the Prin- 
cess Theatre, and it is safe to predict that it will be repeated to 
crowded houses. Another musical event of great importance 
was the first appearance of the famous tenor, Samoiloff, as 
"Otello," on Thursday evening. The programmes for the com- 
ing week will be as follows : Monday night and Saturday matinee, 
Mascagni's "L'Amico Fritz," with Bertossi, Colombini, Arcan- 
geli and the same splendid cast as was given on its first produc- 
tion; Tuesday night, "II Trovatore," with Therry and Samoiloff; 
Wednesday matinee, "Lucia," with Norelli and Pari ; Wednesday 
evening "Otello,*,' with Bertossi, Samoiloff and Arcangeli ; 
Thursday and Sunday nights, first times this season, "Giaconda," 
with Therry, Bari, Arcangeli and Gravina : Friday evening, 
"Cavalleria Pusticana" and "T'Pagliaeci." with Samoiloff; 
Saturday night, "Eigoletto," with Norelli. 

Ollie Mack, the popular comedian with Murray and Mack's 
greatest success, "A Night on Broadway," which comes to the 
American Theatre this Sunday afternoon, is known the world 
over for his quick Irish wit and humor. Tie is the originator of 
many popular sayings, and his "1 love my wife, but Oh, you kid," 
seems to be the rage right now. Another one Mr. Mack has used 
and the public copy it, "Ping the bell en the trolley car of 
prosperity, so a lot of lomr hairs can get off the track." To see 
Mack at his beautiful home, with his horses and dogs, romping 
with his babies, one would not think he could ever be induced to 
go on the road, especially when it is known that lie is possibly 
Ibe richest comedian on the American Btage today; but Mr. 
Mack gets as much enjoyment watching his audiences laugh at 
bis crazy antics as the neople do who rjn to lew. 

* * * 

Beginning next Sunday, the summer stock company of the 
American Theatre will present Henri Lavedan'e "The Duel," a 

play in three acts in which Otis Skinner starred a couple of sea- 
sons ago, and played here at Hie Van JJeas Theatre. Herscnel 
Mavnll. well known in this city, will do the bads in the new 
summer stock company, along with Harriet Worthington, the 
young actress who came here a few months ago to accept li 
with the Valencia Stock Company, but who was compelled to 
cancel her engagement on account of injuries received while 
playing in "Peter Pan." 



THE OPEMXr; OF Till- NEW CHUTES. 

San Franciscans, particularly those who crave the dips, the 
whirls, and the curves peculiar to the amusement park, with its 
"thrillers" and multitudinous fun de looking forward 

lo the opening of the New Chutes, scheduled to take 
m-day. July i ith. Fillmore. Eddy, Turk and Webster streets, 
will bound San Francisco's new playground, which will be the 
most comple of its kind ever attempted in the city. It 

will combine those features which were most attractive at the 
old Haight-sl uids. with the latest thrills and Bene 

of the p.ast's ma sful parks. Do f those fun 

machines that are proving most in Coney bias 

the Riverview Exposition in Chicago will be made feati 
the Fillmore street Chutes. A lo "i . • - ' ■ - 

dread; reached the site of operations, and are being in- 
stalled. Others will he ready for the opening day. 

In addition to the scores of concessions, the New Chut 
offer manv free, open-air attractions. One of the fit: i 
will be the Royal Panda Roma, an organization of 
musicians, led by Signer Qinseppi Sirigi 

\ galaxy of sensational acts will entertain Xew ( 
patrons during the opening week. All of the perfon 
seen twice each afternoon an. I every evening, beginning w 
opening day. 



ENNEIN'S 



*>C. BORATED 
O TALCUM 



^.OWDER 



PRICKLY HEAT, 
CHAFING, and 
SUNBURN, 

"A Utile higher In prtee, perhaps, thin worthless Sutstt- 
ititutts. but treason for it." Removes all odor of pc tip I- 
ion. Ddlfjhiful jfitrShjiin)-. Soldcvcrywhere.ornislltd 
Cip! or 25c. Cs( Mcnncn's (ihe original). Simple Free. 

GERHARD MENNEN CO., N.wmIc. K. I. 



NeW ChuteS ™<«o^-^<iy 



Turk and Webber 



A solid block of fun and refined amusement. 

GRAND OPENING WEDNESDAY, JULY 14TH. 

Open air attractions afternoon and night. Continuous concerts 
by the 

ROYAL BANDA ROMA. 

Led by Signor Guisseppi Sirignano. One thousand surprises. 
Elegantly fitted cafe and grill. "Everything new but the name." 



Princess Theatre 



ELLIS ST.. NR. FILLMORE 
Class A Theatre. 
S. Loverich, Manager Phone West 663 

INTERNATIONAL GRAND OPERA COMPANY. 



Next week's repertoire— Monday nisht and Saturday matinee, Mas- 
eaeni's L'AMICO FRITZ; Tuesday night. IL TROVATORE; "Wed- 
nesday matinee. LUCIA: "Wednesday night. Otello; Thursday and 
Sunday nights. GIACONDA; Friday night. CAVALLERIA 'RUS- 
TICANA and I'PAGLIACCI; Saturday night, RIGOLETTO. 
Prices. $2. $1.60. $1. 60c. 



Valencia Theatre 



Valencia Street, between 13th and 14th 
Telephone. Market 17 



This Sunday afternoon and evening. Last times of WHAT HAP- 
PENED TO JONES. 
Starting Monday, July 12th. Another big scream! 

MRS. TEMPLE'S TELEGRAM. 
With Paul McAllister and a fine cast of funsters. 
Wednesday n Saturday and Sunday matinees, 10c. 

25c. 35c. and 50c. Evening prices— 2. r >c. to $1. Seats on sales at 
the Emporium. 
Next— TOO MUCH JOHNSON. 



New Alcazar Theatre CornerS r"" ,rMU 

Belasco & Mayer. Owners and Managers. Absolutely Class A Bide 
Commencing Monday, July 13th, FLORENCE ROBERTS, with 
Thurlow Bergen and the Alcazar players In Clyde Fitch's clever 
comedy. 

THE FRISKY MRS. JOHNSON. 

One of Miss Roberts' best vehicles. 

Prices — Nights, 26c. to $1. Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 



American Theatre Ml 



rket St. near Seventh. Phone Market 381 
The playhouse of comfort and safety 

RAT & 



One week, commencing Sundav matinee. July 11th 
MACKS' MERRY MUSICAL SUCCESS 

A NIGHT ON BROADWAY. 
evenings, fl 50 cents and 25 cents. 

Matin- 

July 18th — Openlne of the summer stork season. First production 
Otis Skinner's BUCC6SS, THE PI' EL. 



New Orpheum 



O'Farrell Street. 
Bet. Stockton and 



Safest and Mosl Macnifirrnt Theatre in America. 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. 



Matinee every day. 



ARTISTIC VAUDEVILLE 

HELENA FREPERICK In lh THE PATRIOT:" 

CHARI.riTTE PARRY IIP.EE LEIOHTON3; SELMA 

Z: r.EOR.IE HILI.MAN and HIS RJBDPATH XAPAXEES; 
ARMSTR'~>xr, and Cl.VRK: HERR LO NTJE and FRAULEIN 
TILLY: N'EtY ORPHKUM MOTION PICTL'RES. Last week of 
THE THREE SISTERS ATHLETAS. 

Evening B"X seats. $1. Matinee prices 

(except PHONE DOfO- 

I.AS ■ 



Van Ness Theatre 



CORNER VAN NESS AVB 
AND GROVE STREET. 

Phona Markat 500 
Second week begins Sunday night. July 11th. Matinee Saturday 
only. Henry W. 9 ^v York production of the operatic 

■ -^n of the w 

THE MERRY WIDOW. 

Music by Fran« Lehar. 

Coming— POLLY OF THE CXRCUa 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1909 




B 5 ?^ 



^tXIETX 




<t. 



SUMMER DREAMS. 

A fellow falls to drcamin', 

An' 'twould break his sweet repose 
For a wayward wind to ripple 

Tie red breast of a rose. 

An' the world is getting drowsy, 

With blossoms on its breast; 
It's muffled music echoee 
A song of peace an' rest. 

But there's little time for restin' : 

The seed is there to sow, 
An' toil there, in the green fields. 

To make the harvest grow. 

An' dreams are for the roses, 
With dewy drops impearled : 

We've got to keep a-goin' — 
We've eot to build a world ! 



Xo less a personage than Mrs. Eleanor Marl in said the other 
day that there ought to be a training school for "guests!" Mrs. 
Martin does not bristle with epigram, possibly because there is 
a thick, smooth rind of common sense over all her opinions. So 
there is reward in parsing her words, and the idea of the average 
guest needing more training than the average hostess is worth 
thinking about. Of a truth, don't you know more people capable 
of playing host than guest? Honestly, now, don't you, yourself, 
play the role of hostess better than that of guest? 

I know this is not the usual point of view. The journals are 
full of advice to the young hostess; whole books are written 
for the need of the entertainer, and the landscape is cluttered up 
with people willing to give the budding host or hostess all the 
high signs and pass words of the craft — I almost wrote graft! 
For isn't there something of ''graft" in the attitude most people 
assume toward a hostess? They accept an invitation in the same 
spirit that they go to a place of amusement. Their formula, 
coined into words, would read: "Well, here 1 am; now 1 dare 
you to go ahead and amuse me. I dare you to make me smile!'" 
At a theatre at least one pays the price of admission to enter . 
with this mood. But isn't it a peculiar form of graft to take 
for nothing the hospitality of a friend and not even meet pleas- 
ure half way. The modern host is spendthrift with arrange- 
ments for the pleasure and comfort of his guests, and mighty few 
of the guests earn their passage by radiating enjoyment. Which 
possibly accounts for the fact that so many people who are able 
to entertain handsomely very infrequently attempt, it. The 
effort of carrying the dead weight among the guests — the people 
who "dare" you to prick their blase disdain — spoils the pleasure 
of entertaining. 

A Burlingame hostess, who had been discussing the state of 
affairs, told me that she had a house-party over the Fourth, and 
arranged for a horseback ride for her guests. Her own stable 
could not supply the dozen people with mounts, and she had 
rented the best animals obtainable, but, of course, there was a 
disparity in the horses. When it came to giving mounts, a livery 
stable horse fell to the lot of a young woman who has been out 
in society about ten seasons, ami as a result has rather a frappe 
disposition. "Does she expect me to ride that thing?" shrilly 
exclaimed the young woman. "Well, I won't do it, that's all!" 
"Take my horse," said a girl, who is deservedly beloved, and after 
the exchange was made, the party galloped off, but not faster than 
the remark was carried to the hostess, who was not present at the 
time. "Why, she spoke of me as though I were hired to provide 
her with horses, as though I were a stable man ! It's humiliating, 
and it-makes me feel as though I never should entertain again," 
said the hostess, afterwards. 

A Menlo Park matron told me that a girl she invited down 



FAIRMONT HOTEL 



^ 



Provides every requisite for the comfort 

and convenience of its guests. 

Single rooms with bath, from S2.50 upwards. 

Under the management of 

^Palace Hotel Company 



j 



for a week stayed three, and although she knew the waitress and 
maid had both left, every time she wanted a drink of water she 
would ask the muchly overworked cook to get it. When it be- 
came evident that the guest was going to extend her visit to the 
horizon of their tolerance of her. the family packed up and went 
to Tahoe as the only polite subterfuge of getting rid of an un- 
welcome guest. 

"You can count the girls who are always welcome on your two 
hands," said this hostess, "and the men are not so much easier to 
handle. I could count them without using a Chinese counting 
machine. Take a girl like Mary Keeney, who always has the 
choice of two or three places to go to every week-end. She is 
always happy and appreciative, oven if there isn't 'something do- 
ing' every minute of the time. She helps the others to have a 
good time, and doesn't sit back and try to stimulate the hostess to 
further effort." 

A very pretty story was baked into the wedding cake given 
to the guests at the marriage of Miss Ida Remington and Mr. 
Walter Broder. The cake was made of "sugar and spice and 
everything nice." just twelve years ago, and presented by an 
English lady to Mr. and Mrs. Remington to be used at their 
crystal wedding. But as it happened, that event was not cele- 
brated in festive manner, and so Mr. Remington had the cake 
tinned and sealed, and if was carefully put away for an appro- 
priate occasion. When the earthquake and fire came, the cake 
was one of the first things Mrs. Remington carted out of the 
house. However, the house was saved, and the cake was once 
more restored to its place. The years passed, and then came the 
appropriate time to unseal the marv [ou£ cake. What more pro- 
pitious occasion than at the marriage of the only daughter of the 
household? The cake came out of its wrappings as rich and 
moist as the day it went in twelve years ago, and the first two 
slices were daintily boxed and beribboned and sent to Honolulu 
to the son and daughter of the lady who had made the cake. 

Miss Helen Dean's nearly-lost adventure on Lake Tahoe the 
other day reminds me of an escapade of the little son of the 
Peter Martin's. When they were out here one summer, they 
visited at the home of a millionaire who has a place on the Mc- 
Gloud river. Baby Martin disappeared one day, and the frantic 
nurse aroused the household, whose terror-stricken thoughts, as 
the child could not be found, kept focusing on the river that 
tumbled and leaped over boulders in a mad swirl that would 
mean instant death to a child. Just about when the river seemed 
the only solution, the baby was found in back of the kitchen, 
squatted between two garbage cans and mussing up its ears with 
a piece of pie ! Miss Dean's escape from the waters of Tahoe was 



An Ideal Auto Control Station 

THE VENDOME, San Jose 

Here are a few delightful trips: 

Santa Cruz Mountains 
Mount Hamilton 
Monterey- 
Santa Clara Valley 
Mission San Jose 
Santa Cruz 

Our Garage at your service. The Vendome offers 
every comfort for week end visitors. 

H. W. LAKE, Mgr. 



July 10, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



17 



not against such a kitchenette background but as Dearly as I 
can figure out, she was not in any more danger of death from 
the angry waters. 

Word bas just been received here thai Hamilton Vose Bryan 
bas distinguished himself by passing the examinations at An- 
napolis and receiving the highest number of credits in a class of 
six hundred applicants from every section of the United States. 
The achievement is all the more interesting in the face of the 
fact that young Bryan was only an alternate appointee of both 
Senator Perkins and Congressman McKinley. Both principals 
failed, and Bryan not only upheld California's supremacy, but 
showed up shoulders above the applicants from every other State. 
Hamilton Vose Bryan is the son of Mrs. Prentis C. Hale, and she 
is to be felicitated upon the good fortune of her son in the same 
degree as she must be proud of him. 

Lovers of beautiful pictures will have a rare treat at the 
Colonial ball-room of the St. Francis Friday evening, July 16th, 
in a stereopticon exhibition of lantern-slides photographed from; 
nature direct in colors. This is conceded to be the most remark- 
able advance in photography since the original discovery by 
Daguerre. The pictures include Western scenery, studies in still 
life, brilliant flowers, animals, street scenes, sunsets, child and 
costume studies and portraits. They are the work of Mr. Stanley 
McGinnis and Mr. George F. Clifton, amateurs of Denver, who 
have excited enthusiasm by their success in color photography. 
They are now touring California. 

Saturday's '"'flyer" from San Francisco brought to Del Monte 
and Pacific Grove something like four hundred people to enjoy 
the Fourth among grand old oaks or beneath the pines at one or 
the other of the charmingly environed hostelnes. A dozen 
motor parties put up at Pacific Grove Hotel. Among (linn. 
from the city, was E. L. Henrickson, A. B. Moon, H. H. Hen- 
rickson, A. E. Axe and N. Oleson, in a Peerless machine; Mr. 
and Mrs. John N. Pomroy, who had with them, in their ( ladillac, 

Mrs. Barrington, Mr. and Mrs. W. 0. Gaj >, Bailey Pomeroy 

and Gcraldine Gannon: W. G. Tibbetts and family, in bis Stev- 
ens, and Dr. Edward Topham, accompanied by his brother, who 
drove through Salinas, spending Saturday nighi there, W. li. 
Stewart was here from Oakland in his Miti In II car. With him 

were Mrs. Stewart, Gene Hawley and Q 'ge G. Hawley. F. J. 

Griffin, with his family, came over from Salinas in his Stude- 
baker, and Mr. and .Mrs. T. F. McConnell and Mr. and .Mrs. T. L. 
Price, from Morgan Hill, in a six-cylinder White steamer. 

Among other prominent people who had headquarters i\ Pacific 
Grove Hotel over the Fourth were Key, It. Fletcher Coo 
Episcopal divine. IV en Albuquerque, who Sunday 

services at Si. Mary's Church here, and will remain i 
July; Mrs. J. B. Nederost and daughter, with C. L. Mb ! 
IV. en San'Franeisco ; Mr. and Mrs. It. A. Hunter, Ri lard G 
with his wife and family ; Mr, and U is. K r. Mr. and 

Mrs. F. M. Swazey, Ruth Swa ey, Ollie Merdecker, of Oakland. 
J. Elliott Jennings, and William P. Judge, who is connect* 
the Hibernia Bank, of San Francisco; Harrj Hooper ol Ber- 
keley. 

Dr. 0. S. Ti'uminer and bride returned late in the week from 
a -iv weeks' honeymoon trip, which took the couple to inh i 
Alaskan points and down through Seattle, where they did the 1 
Seattle- Yukon-Pacific Fair. Dr. Trammer is a retired ph 
illli. whose homo has been in Pi e many \ 

Mrs. dames Campbell has the Kmile Bruguiei a Mon- 

terey's hill-side for the summer. She has her family of inter- 
with her, and they are seen often in their 
Thomas car, driving about the penii 

Mrs. d. P, Pryor is entertaining a; ber borne in Pi 
Miss Nellie Ord, daugl ter ol B. 0. C. Ord, I . S. A., n bred. 



Hotel Westminster 

American Plan 



Los Angeles, Cal. 

Fourth tod Maio So. 



REOPENED 

K.ites per Day. $2.50 Rooms without Bath. 
Rooms with Bath. S3.0O. $3.50 and $4.00. 



European Plan 

$1.00 p-r day and up 
With bath. 11.60 and up 



F. O. JOHNSON. Proprietor 



Mr. F. A. Somers and wife, from San Frani isco, are making 
an extended stay at Hotel Rafael. 

(Continued to Page 18.) 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

APACE 'WITH SCIENCE 



WHATEVER COMFORT IS KNOWN 

TO ANY TRAVELER IS AT THE 

COMMAND OF EVERY GUEST. 



HOTEL VICTORIA 

N. E. cor. Bush and Stockton 

Centrally Located 

A Modern and Up-To-Date Family Hotel. 
Sun in Every Room. Elaborate Furnish- 
ings. Excellent Cuisine. Large Lobby and 
Reception Room. Grill Room. Dining Room 

European and American Plan 



Hotel Rafael 



San Rafael, Cal. 



Under the management of J. H. HOLMES 

formerly of Hotel Green. Pasadena 



Buy tickets and check baggage direct to San Rafael. 
Special attention given to Touring parties. 



Hotel Del Monte 



Invites you to come and 

PLAY GOLF 

on the finest 18-hole golf course in the West, 
within five minutes walk of the Hotel. 

H. R WARNER. Manager. 



THE PENINSULA 

The big 1 , first-class hotel that is only half an hour's ride from 
San Francisco- 

THE PENINS ULA 

The lending suburban hotel of central California, with the 
splendid reputation for service, table and general conditions. 

THE PENINSULA 

The hotel with all the comforts that the mos\ fastidious could 
desire. Special rates in tne bachelors' quarters. 

JAS. H. DOOLITTLE. Manager, San Mateo, Cal. 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1909 




(Continued from Page 17.) 

The "Service Set" at the Fairmont is becoming almost as well 
known among the men and women of the "Service" as some 
of the clubs. Here, returning officers are sure to find some of 
their friends who are either coming or going out to the islands. 
And here the ladies find a comfortable and refined atmosphere 
that appeals to them. Among some of the more recent additions 
to the "Service Set" now at the Fairmont are Max Garber and 
Mrs. Garber, U. S. A. ; Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Glassford, U. S. N. ; 

F. A. Merritt, IT. S N. ; Rear-Admiral and Mrs. W. A. Mead, 
IT. S. 1ST.; Lieutenant Commander and Mrs. M." C. Gorgas, U. 
S. N.; and Mrs. E. W. Bannaffon, U. S. N.; H. B. Stickney, 
IT. S. S. South Dakota; H. A. Dunt, IT. S. N. 

• Dr. Samuel Weiss, brother of Attorney Win. G. Weiss, ar- 
rived in this city last Sunday from New York, and was greeted 
by his family and friends at a dinner given in his honor. 

Mrs. George B. Castle, of Honolulu, accompanied by her 
daughters, Miss Dorothy and Margaret Castle, are at the Fair- 
mont: The Castles'are among the most prominent of the people 
in the islands, and make frequent visits to San Francisco. 

Mrs. B. F. Brodie, of San Francisco, who is staying with her 
children at Del Monte, entertained at dinner on Saturday, the 
3d. Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Woods, Miss Woods, Mr. and Mrs. Cuyler 
Lee, Professor B. E. Allardice and Mr. Langstroth. The places 
at table were marked with name cards and beautiful carnations 
from the Del Monte conservatories. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Stone, of Burlingame, came up for a few 
days in town, and are at their apartments in the Fairmont. 

Major Charles A. Winship, one of the leading capitalists of 
the Pacific Coast, with his wife, are stopping at Hotel Rafael. 

George S. Allmon and Walter Dougherty, prominent business 
men of Wilmington, Delaware, are at the Fairmont for a week's 
visit. 

At a family dinner party given at the residence of Councillor 
M. A. Rapken, 2443 Sutter street, Wednesday evening, June 23d, 
the engagement was announced of Miss Sadie Rapken, only 
daughter of Councillor and Mrs. M. A. Rapken, to Attorney Wm. 

G. Weiss. 

Mrs. George H. Howard, of San Mateo, who is visiting her 
mother, Mrs. Schmieden, returned to Del Monte on July 3d. 

Harvey Bowring, P. M. Stewart, both of London; A. W. 
Campbell, Toronto, Canada, are among the distinguished visitors 
from outside our borders who are now staying at the Fairmont. 

J. B. Brook and family registered at Hotel Rafael this week. 
Mr. Brook is a prominent banker in San Jose, and is touring 
Northern California in his automobile. 

W. Pridham, of Alameda, one of the best known officials of 
Wells, Fargo & Co., was at Del Monte for the holidays. 

Mrs. H. T. Lally, with her daughter, are spending a portion of 
the season at Hotel Rafael. 

May Sutton won the State Championship from Hazel Hotch- 
kiss on Monday afternoon at Hotel Rafael Courts. About two 
thousand spectators witnessed the most exciting game ever played 
in the State. The first half of the game was" played fast and 
hard on both sides, the score closing 6 to 4 in favor of Miss 
Sutton. Miss Hotchkiss played remarkably well, but a few of 
Miss Sutton's back-hand smashes were too much for her, and 
the last game closed 6 to 1 in favor of Miss Sutton. They will 
play for the Pacific Coast Championship in September, and Miss 
Hotchkiss promises a stronger and swifter game with the cham- 
pion. 

Social Events Crowd one Another at the St. Francis. 

Rev. W. S. Ransford arrived from Paris last week and regis- 
tered at the hotel. Mr. Ransford was summoned from the other 
side by the illness of his son, a mining engineer, who is sufferino- 
from typhoid. 

Arrangements have been made by the Stanford Parlor, No. 
76, Native Sons of the Golden West, for a banquet to be' held 
on the evening of July the 30th. This event will be a notable 
one, as it wDl be a formal congratulation of the newly-installed 
officers. 

The Indoor Yacht Club, an organization of sportsmen who 



have never been aboard a yacht, and whose experience in marine 
affairs has hedn driven largely from observation of the chorus 
in "Pinafore" and other nautical productions, felicitated them- 
selves upon their continued good fortune in eluding the dangers 
of the deep, by giving a banquet in the Red Room a few nights 
ago. A goodly number of experienced navigators were assembled 
around the board, which groaned with mirth and the sources 
thereof. 

W. Mont Ferry, the well-known Salt Lake lawyer and city 
councillor, is among recent arrivals. W. N. Gifford, one of the 
capitalists of Hawaii, is here also. 

A quartette, consisting of Walter Burckhalter, Delma Borg, 
Miss Alice Bean and Miss Grace Kidwell, rendered patriotic 
songs in the drawing room on Saturday evening, and on the 
porch alter luncheon, on Sunday, the 4th, at Hotel Del Monte. 

Brigadier-General Marion P. Maus, U. S. A., formerly Colonel 
Commanding the 20-th Infantry, and now in command of the De- 
partment of the Columbia, spent some days at Del Monte last 
week. He entertained Major W. B. Wright and Mrs. Wright at 
dinner. 

Dr. and Mrs. G. C. Rimmons, prominent members of Sacra- 
mento's smart set, have been spending the week at the St. 
Francis. Before returning to their home, which is one of the 
handsomest in the Capitol City, they will visit Del Monte, and 
later the Hutch in Sausalito. which is the residence of Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Miller. 



The San Francisco woman is a woman of taste, and she 

knows the real thing in style when she sees it. Paris is in her 
eye, for Paris is the model of fashions feminine. "The Bonnet 
Shop," importers of Parisian millinery, at 121 Geary street, em- 
bodies in all its displays all that is "chic" in the very latest 
Paris modes in headgear for women. The hats are strictly tail- 
ored and are snappy and smart in design and color. • 



Try Murine Eye Remedy 

For Red. "Weak. Weary, "Watery Eyes, Granulated Eyelids and Pink 
Eyes. Murine Doesn't Smart. Soothes Eye Pain. Compounded by Ex- 
perienced Physicians; Contains no Injurious or Prohibited Drugs. Try 
Murine for Your Eye Troubles. You Will Like Murine. Try It In Baby's 
Eyes for Scaly Eyelids. All Druggists Sell Murine at 60c. 




rmsMitmtnmiK 

Ridgurau: Limited: Ettablithtd 1836. 

Of all accommodating Grocers 
" There is no tea just as good." 

RIDGWAYS supplied tea for the late Queen Victoria's use for 
forty years. 

RIDGWAYS' prices are no greater than other high-grade teas 
that do not compare with Rldgways In quality. 

PRICES, 50c, 65c, 75c, $1.00 PER POUND. ASK YOUR GROCER 



MANZANITA HALL 



A School for Boys, Palo Alto, Cal. 
Will give your boy a thorough preparation for college, while 
training him to be strong, self-reliant and manly. Special attention 
given to preparation for Stanford. Absence of rigid classification 
permits rapid advancement. Ample facilities for athletic sports. 
Write for illustrated catalogue. 

W. A. SHEDD, HEAD MASTER. 



HOTHER WISMER, (VIOLINIST) 

pupil of Royal Hig-hschool of Music, Berlin, and Ysaye, will resume 
teacmng August ls"t. Address 2945 Fillmore Street, San Francisco. 



MOVED 



Gladding, McBean & Co. 

Olfice: 311-317 CROCKER BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

Warehouse: 147-151 MINNA STREET. Between New Montgomery and Third 



CLAY 
PRODUCTS 



July 10, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



19 



altfe f aaemiU Bailey an& 3lta Artist 



All on account of one measley dollar ($1.00), Chris Jorgensen, 
the Bohemian artist, whose Yosemite studio is one of the show- 
places of the famous Valley, has run amuck of one Major H. C. 
Benson, of Uncle Sam's Fourteenth Cavalry, the Government 
official who ifcted as guardian of the Yosemite National Park 
for the last two years. 

Benson thought, and still thinks, that Jorgensen should pay 
more than one dollar a year rental for his studio bungalow. He 
says that Jorgensen several years ago made "an unconscionable 
bargain" with the Yosemite State Commissioners, signing them 
up for an "absurdly low" rental for a long term. 

This "unconscionable bargain" Benson complains of in his 
annual report to the Secretary of "the Interior, just published. 
He says that the shrewd artist so framed the lease that it has 
been found impossible to revoke it. The Major himself is very 
sorry that it can't be revoked. 

The facts favoring Jorgensen are that he has, in the ten years 
of his residence in the Valley, spent something like $9,000 im- 
proving the plot of land assigned to him. This is an invest- 
ment which he stands to lose when his lease expires, for it is one 
of Uncle Sam's rules that all property improvements in the Val- 
ley revert to him — belong to him, in fact, from the very date 
they are put in. 

At the present time, Jorgensen has, unquestionably, the most 
comfortable resort in the Valley. It is his home, but, like a 
good Bohemian, he has the latch-string out day and night, and 
no visitor, friend or stranger, fails to receive the hospitality of 
the big studio and its home-like hearth. When Roosevelt made 
his flying trip through the Valley six years ago, Jorgensen en- 
tertained him at the studio, and, since then, celebrities from 
all over the world have been accorded a warm welcome at the 
same bungalow. 

So, Jorgensen argues, he is giving the Government and his 
fellow-citizens enough to warrant his being relieved of a heavy 
tax. Furthermore, it is whispered, there are enough high Fed- 
eral officials and influential Californians who share Jorgensen's 
view of the case, and are ready to aid the artist in keeping his 
rental down to a minimum. The Major, so far, is the only per- 
son to file a vigorous objection, and his official kick reads like 
this: 

"The Jorgensen lease includes about five acres of land, two 
dwelling houses, a stable and other outhouses, located in the im- 
mediate vicinity of Sentinel Hotel — one of the finest sites in the 
valley; for this lease, and the privilege of selling his paintings, 
lie pays the absurdly low price of $1 a year, having 
."M'vssion for a Long term from the State Commissioners, when 
it became apparent that the valley would lie re-ceded to the Fed- 
eral Government, This is recognized as an on 
gain, but the lease was so framed that its revocation is pra 
impossible." 



THE ISSUE IX HAWAII. 

The Hawaiian people arc face t" face to-day with an issue, u 

is not the question of labor that is agitating the people of the 

mid-sea islands. It is something that is more agreeable and 

In topic of conversation from one end of the group to the 

other. 

\ special commissioner of the Overland Monthly has arrived 
at Honolulu, with the Overland Monthly for July. It is on all 
the news-stands and in every home, and by the time the News 
Letter reaches you, it will be mailed to all points of the com- 
pass. The July issue of the Overland Monthly has been pro- 
nounced the finest of any magazine ever published West of the 
Rocky Mountains. 

It must not be thought that Hawaii is the only topic 
in this number of the standard Western magazine, for its 
contain as much of the matter going to make up a maga 
usual. 

The fiction is of the summer order, and the feature stuff is 
er, the Overland Month 
ile summer vacation magazine. Take it with you U] 

:nds and on all 
The pi - usual. One hundred and nin 



OUTRAGES OF THE TELEPHONE. 

The Drunken Sailor's fate having been satisfactorily settled, 
what shall be done with the Telephone Fiend? This distres <<<■ 
problem is agitating more than one long-suffering soul. The 
Fiend is petticoated, rarely trousered, who holds you up until you 
are ready to hurl, anathemas upon the very Inventor. Where is 
the specialist who will conquer this disease of (he wire — disease 
that is working such wholesale havoc, rilling husbandly purselets, 
stealing time bodily, breaking the needed rest of invalids without 
a qualm, and robbing the "party" at the other end of all surety 
of peace. For all else seem we to have found a quietus, but 
for the "caller up" at any old time or place, no remedy seems 
forthcoming. 

That the telephone has blessed many a man, saved many lives, 
and helped pile up fortunes, is true; but has it not cursed some 
women, ruined more lives, and hastened domestic, misfortune? It 
has. Has it not become the favorite pastime of the woman with 
nothing to do ? It has. Does it not accelerate gossip ? Aid 
the flirt and the wayward constantly? It does. Self-indulgent 
women waste their husband's money by ordering food "over the 
too handy telephone, rather than bother to dress for the street," 
thereby losing both their wholesome morning exercise and their 
chance thriftily to secure the best there is for the price at market 
or at stores from which the family larder is supplied. The time 
wasted by women in foolish 'phoning can never be offset by time 
gained by forehanded men in business, for what shall it profit a 
man if he gain the whole world if his "world" is lost through 
folly? 

Telephoning, from a habit, finally becomes a vice, and a men- 
ace to the courtesies. It has destroyed the fine art of social 
correspondence. It has crowned Haste with Courtesy's laurel. 

Another phase of the telephone madness, and one of its most 
audacious, is the impertinences ii makes possible against the 
party "called up." Impulsive women say tilings to men and to 
each other over the telephone that they would never say face to 
face. To be rude to an acquaintance is at all times shocking to 
the gentle, therefore to have to answer the long-drawn-out "call" 
of an idler, who wishes to kill time at your expense, is outrageous. 
Nevertheless, seemingly it must be done and very graciously. 
with "thank you" added, or — become a target for ire. Sometimes 
you pay the price of discomfoTJ to your eniiiv family. If you 
protesi verbally, forthwith von arc a "crank," disagreeable, un- 
feeling, and what not Again if you fail to "call up" in turn, 
you are "queer." If you do. it is a signal foT renewed mortgages 
upon your time, patience, and quiet. Busy men whose women- 
folk, friends, or sweethearts call them up inopportunely are be- 
ginning to lie dil igenl ly, in ordi i neir day. 

A telephone in a residence Bhonld be Eor the convenience of the 
user, for imperal ■ needs, ir exceptional social emergi 
where writ ing, sending able— for ; 

illness, for bad weather, for im or trains, or 

Service of any sort. For these lie til I mii-aMe. but for 

the e\i He between foolish women, communi 

n the prowling wolf and the unsuspecting lamb, it hi 
come an unmitigated domestic curse. 

The i tea with the Man of the House. In his wife's 

good taste and judgment one man may safely put his trust; he 
needs no remedy. The other man, whose wife's stability of pur- 
pose, and dignity, are of a dubious quality, does well to look to it 
that he affords madam neither an unlimited service nor oppor- 
tunity to decorate him metaphorically with a Fool's Cap and a 
(telephone) bell. — Minna Thomas Antrim in Lippincotrs Maga- 
stne. 



$12,000 
Marine View Lot 

45x120 on Green Street through to alley. 
Unobstructed Marine view. 1 block from 
cars. Nothing better in the city. Apply 
Room 16. 773 Market St.. San Francisco. 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1909 




The New Era of 
Gold Mining. 



"Within the next three years, Cali- 
fornia will reach, if not excel, in the 
output of gold the record established 
in the early fifties, when it exceeded 
the $50,000,000 mark," is the assertion John Hays Hammond 
makes in a recent letter to a friend in this city, who is heavily 
interested in Californian mining properties. The eminent en- 
gineer bases his auguries upon the recent discovery of proi esses 
by metallurgists here and in Europe which make profitable the 
treatment of ores now regarded as waste, and also from the fact 
that the great financial interests are investing as heavily in gold 
properties as in other propositions. The development of elec- 
tric power by the big companies is another factor that has made 
mining operations possible in districts that heretofore have re- 
ceived°but scant attention. Deep mining and the profitable work- 
ing of low-grade ore have become possible by the development of 
electric power. A conservative authority estimates that there 
are (500,000,000 tons of five to ten dollar ore lying on the dump 
heaps in California available for profitable treatment by new- 
processes and cheap electric power. The Herault smelter, which 
has given practical demonstration of its capacity, utility in the 
reduction of refractory ores, will undoubtedly be a factor in dis- 
tricts where there are mountains of that kind of gold bearing 
rock which cannot be worked profitably except by this new in- 
vention. Deep mining is the cry from all sections, and in Nevada 
George Wingfield has demonstrated beyond all doubt that the 
lower levels of the Goldfield properties are more productive than 
those above. The Sturgis interests are backed up by the advice 
of leading authorities that the greatest wealth of the Comstock 
is yet untouched. The gold mining era has fairly set in, and it 
is being promoted by those who have made success in copper, 
petroleum and iron; men who not only have the capacity for 
directing development on a gigantic and profitable scale, but who 
possess the prestige of having attained success in all their prior 
undertakings in exploiting the treasures of mother earth. 



Tonopah Mining. 



The Tonopah Mining Company has 
declared another quarterly dividend 
of 25 per cent, or $250,000, and an 
extra dividend of ten per cent. This dividend will not be pay- 
able until the 21st of this month. The Tonopah Mining Com- 
pany to date has declared dividends amounting to five millions 
of dollars. The treasury is reported in line shape, with a strong 
reserve on hand, and the mine is in splendid condition. 



The boast that was made after the 
Geaet-Steeet Road. fiasco of voting on the Geary street 

bonds will eventuate in nothing, as 
it seems more than likely that the plan to place the question be- 
fore the people again, at their expense, at a special election, has 
practically been abandoned, or will be. The probability is, that 
when all is said and done, the lease of the road will be extended 
or renewed or the road sold. Possibly in view of the vote, the 
Supervisors will themselves continue the road as it is. 



Wiping Out Defunct 
coepoeations. 



The State of Washington will wipe 
out at one fell swoop about 15,000 
corporations. This includes such as 
have not paid their corporation tax 
for more than two years. The Attorney-General has decided 
that it will not do to pay up now, and in addition, such corpora- 
tions as are deemed unworthy of charter will be weeded out as 
well. There are thousands of old corporations delinquent, and 
many others will occupy the same position by the time the dras- 
tic emasculation occurs. It would be a good idea if the scheme 
were followed out in California, and steps taken to wipe out 
the countless corporations doing business here, incorporated in 
this State and in Arizona and Nevada. There are a large num- 
ber of corporations, incorporated at the time of the oil excite- 
ment, and, later on, when the fever was greatest at Goldfield and 
Bullfrog, that should be eliminated. The other day certain min- 



ing stocks were offered, on the exchange in San Francisco, that 
have no existence, t'ompanies have ceased operating, leases have 
expired, and a thousand and one things have conspired to make 
them a dead issue. Still, these stocks are being handled and sold. 
When such companies are killed off by time, there should be a list 
published, to the end that gullible people do not trade in worth- 
less stocks. 



A comparison of the statements 
The Bank Statements, made at this time last year and the 

statements made at this date, show 
an increase in individual deposits that is indicative of improving 
financial health. Last year showed deposits aggregating $45,- 
211,466.94, and this year"s, showing an increase of $1,497,- 
538.S4, is placed at $-R;."'I!),<Hi:,.;n. ' There is. due to these con- 
ditions, an increase of loans and discounts as well. These show 
an increase of $1,329,186.82. 



Statistics That Show 
the Heal Thing. 



The compilations id' William Han- 
hart, secretary of the Savings Bank 
section of the American Bankers' 
Association, show that the people of 
this country have on deposit in the various savings institutions 
the enormous aggregate of $9. -1 66. 111. 488. In this amount and 
in the number of depositors we find no parallel in any other 
country on the globe. The figures given by Mr. Hanhart are 
a revelation as to the aggregate of American savings. Reports 
heretofore have been accepted without question from the statis- 
tics furnished by the Comptroller of the Treasury, whose credita- 
bility is knocked into a cocked hat, and fall short of nearly 
$6,000,000,000 of the actual figures. Mr. Hanhart's report en- 
ters into detail and substantiates every dollar that he has set 
down in the aggregate. In the compilation of the Comptroller's 
statistics, he looked no further than the 1 153 -livings banks, 
with their $3,660,553,915 deposits. Mr. Hanhart, however, has 
a larger range of vision, and presents the following array of fig- 
ures to add to those furnished by the federal statisticians: 15,- 
000 State banks, savings banks holding in their savings accounts 
deposits of $1,568,720,391 : 201 1 national banks, holding savings 
deposits, not included in the Comptroller's report, amounting i" 
$331,562,680; 5159 building and loan associations, with 1,876,- 
967 members, and accumulated savings of $7)5.993,398: 827 
life insurance companies, having savings assets of $3,159,581,- 
074; making a grand total of $9,466,411,488. The Hanhart 
figures are not only a revelation, but they explain some of the 
conditions that could not be accounted for under the meagre 
(Continued to Page 22.) 

HIGH GRADE INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

LIST ON REQUEST 

SlltrO & Co., Brokers 

412 Monteomery St.. San Francisco Established 1858 

Private Wire Chicago — New York. 

J. C. WILSON 

f New York Stock Exchange 
Member < Chicago Board of Trade 

(. Stock and Bond Exchange, S. F. 
Local and Eastern Stocks and Bonds 



Main Office 
Mills Bide. 

Tel. Klirny 482 



Branch Office 
Hotel Alexandria 
Los Angeles 



FRANK P. MEDINA, ATTORNEY AT LAW 

of Medina and GrifRn. Dissolved, remains at the old address, 812-814 
ClauB Spreckels Blder. Patents. Trade Marks, Copyrights, Patent Liti- 
gation. MANY YEARS EXPERIENCE WITH PATENT OFFICE EXAMINERS. 



Vanderbilt Elates Company 



Gilt Edge Realty Bonds 



Apply 



First Mortgage 



REALTY EXCHANGE, 1047 PHELAN BUILDING, San Francisco, Cal. 
Home Office— New York City 






July 10, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



21 



r 




DC 



DOE 



E=JE 



DDE 



in 



n 

NINETY-FOURTH HALF YEARLY REPORT OF THErl 

San Francisco Savings Union 



(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) Temporarily 
located at northwest corner California and Montgomery Streets. Pending 
erection of its new building at junction of Market and O'Farrell Streets with Grant 
avenue. Conducts a Savings Bank Business exclusively. Money deposited 
on or before July 10th will receive interest from July 1st. 



□ 



L 



DC 



SWORN STATEMENT 

of the Condition and Value of its ASSETS and 
LIABILITIES June 30, 1909: 

ASSETS 

Loans secured by first lien on real estate wholly within the Stale of 

California $13,205,095.73 

Loans secured by pledge and hypothecation of approved bonds and 

stocks ." 806,293.78 

Bonds ill' the municipalities and scl I districts of the Sta 

California, railroad bonds and bonds and stock- of local cor- 
porations, the value of which is 9.12 

Bank Premises 700,0 

Other real estate in the Slat : i alii 666, 

Kin nitinv and Fixtures 500.00 

Cash in vault and in bank '• 132,006.3 I 

Total assets $25,934,816.52 

LIABILITIES 

Due depositors '. $23,698,195.30 

al paid-up > ' 

id Contingent Funds 1,222,804.61 

General Taa &.ccouii . Balance I ndisbu 'ed 16.61 

Total Liabilities "■•"'•' 



San Francisco, dun,- 30, 1909. 



ed) LOVELL Will 1 I . P 
id) K. M. WELCH, I 



State of California, City and County of San Frani is o, sa 

Wc do solemn:' Bweftr thai are have (and each 
the matters contained in the foregoing report, and tl 
matter and thine therein contained 

ed) LOVELL WHITE. 
(S gned) B. M. WELCH. 

- scribed and - ' 

lh i FRANK L. 

Notary Public in and for the City an - - tte of California. 



DDE 



DDE 



3E3E 



DDE 



DDE 



i 




n 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1909 



iFtttanrtal 



(Continued from, Page 20.) 

showing made by the federal statisticians. It is strange that 
Washington, if it cannot display American progress in its enor- 
mous aggregate, should attempt the job of sending forth statistics 
that are less than 100 per cent of what we really are. 



A Handsome New 
Bank Building. 



In the many changes that have 
occurred in the habitations of 
the large financial institutions of 
San Francisco since the big fire, 
there are but few that are as important as the removal to a per- 
manent building by the San Francisco National Bank. The bank 
opened for business in its new quarters at the corner of Califor- 
nia and Liedesdorf street, in the heart of the city's financial dis- 
trict, on July 6th. 

The San Francisco National Bank building is one of the finest 
in the city, and the designing and architecture is by the very 
capable Messrs. Burnham & Co. This firm has provided the 
bank with every imaginable modern convenience for the transac- 
tion of business. Coupled with utility, however, a splendid re- 
gard for artistic unities and the beauty of design. The banking 
quarters are flooded with light, and they are airy, and are deco- 
rated in white and gold. The ceiling is done in mosaic, and is 
a work of art. The vaults aie of armor plate and are substantial 
in character and absolutely fire proof. 

Everything is substantial and beautiful in appearance. The 
combination of Vermont marble, the bronze work of exquisite de- 
sign, all of the lighter shades relieved by the dark color of the 
unvarnished solid mahogany, makes a fine tonal picture which 
grips the onlooker. The opening day, the sixth, found the bank 
decorated with floral gifts expressive of the well-wishing of 
friends and depositors. 

The counters are of white Vermont marble, and are topped in 
verde antique, and from this rise the pure Corinthian columns, 
supporting between them the bronze scrolled windows. These are 
appropriately designated by inscriptions denoting the various 
departments in a modern banking house. This work is original 
and beautiful in effect, and it follows in general the Italian Re- 
naissance. 

The ceiling is supported by gold-capped pillars, and it shows a 
mosaic effect in plaster of soft. shades of color varying easily 
one into the other. White and gold is the predominating tint, 
and the general result is pleasing to the senses in the highest de- 
gree. The rooms of the President and the directors are in direct 
contrast, and are in wainscoting of mahogany. 

Adjoining these is the ladies' room, and this is fitted up for 
the convenience of this patronage, to the end that women may 
enjoy privacy in the transaction of their business affairs. 

This is one of the substantial banking institutions of San 
Francisco, and it commenced business on December 1, 1897. The 
original capital was $500,000, and this was later increased to 
$1,000,000 on July 1. 1905. The dividend payment up to De- 
cember 31, 1901, was at the rate of five per cent per annum, but 
since December 31st, of that year, the dividends have been con- 
tinuously maintained at the rate of six per cent per annum, pay- 
able quarterly. The surplus and undivided profits are $100,000. 

The bank's correspondents are some of the leading financial 
houses in the largest cities of the world. 

The officers of the bank are: James K. Wilson, president; 
W. J. Johnson, vice-president; C. K. Mcintosh, vice-president; 
F. W. Wolfe, cashier; C. L. Davis, assistant cashier. The direc- 
torate comprises some of the most substantial and best-known 
business men of the city, namely : W. P. Johnson, William J. 
Dutton, George A. Pope, C. S. Benedict, George Aimer Newhall, 
W. H. Talbot, H. D. Morton, C. K. Mcintosh and James K. 
Wilson. 



The Remains of 

a Swindling Concern. 



The Pacific Coast Savings Society, 
of eons ago, the complex compound 
of savings institution and building 
and loan association through which 
the people of this city were swindled, still lives an insolvent. Its 
care-takers have ensconsed its fast-ebbing assets up in an office 
where a plentitude of attorneys are prescribing all sorts of legal 



mixtures that mean the rapid absorption of the remains. The 
institution comes within the province of the administration of 
Superintendent of State Banks Alden Andersen. Judge Seawell 
to the contrary, and so that Mr. Andersen will know where the 
records of the tottering institution are kept, he is directed to 
the offices of Samuel Rosenheim, on the eleventh floor of the 
Chronicle building. Mr. Rosenheim is in Europe, but in charge 
of the invalid are a multitude of attorneys who will explain how 
much legal attention is being devoted to the prevention of any 
of the assets being lost on repayment of depositors. The insti- 
tution requires the light of public inquiry. There are over 
$300,000 of the people's money tied up in this concern, and it is 
time their interests were guarded. 



That standard savings and loan in- 
Hibernia Statement. stitution, the Hibernia Savings and 

Loa.n Society, publishes a most flat- 
tering statement of its condition. The assets are. placed at the 
enormous sum of $54,925,421.87. These consist in bonds of the 
United States, amounting to $12,133,098.15 cash in United 
States coin in gold and silver, and checks, $2,551,448.43, and the 
balance is made up of miscellaneous bonds, in promissory notes, 
in real estate and in the contingent fund. The Hibernia Society 
is a very conservative managed society, and its success is due 
primarily to this fact. Gradually its repute has grown to such 
an extent that it is pointed out as one of the signal successes and 
second to none in its class in the financial world. 



The statement of the San Francisco Savings Union is be- 
fore us, and it is one of the most flattering ever issued by this 
old-established financial institution. The Savings Union is tem- 
porarily located at the Northwest corner of California and Mont- 
gomery streets, and will remove later to its new building at the 
junction of Market and O'Farrell with Grant avenue. The con- 
dition of the bank- is excellent at the date, June 30th, and it 
shows total assets of $25,934,816.52. 

The officers of this 'bank are well known as conservative fac- 
tors in the financial world, and with such executives as Lovell 
White as President, and R. M. Welch as cashier, its tide of pros- 
perity will not wane. 



Wells Fargo Nevada National 
Bank 

Of San Francisco 

UNION TRUST BUILDING, NO. 4 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Capital Paid Up 
Surplus and Undivided Profits 
Total 



$ 6,000,000.00 

4,868,154.20 

$10,868,154.20 



ISAIAS W. HELLMAN 
I. W. HELLMAN. Jr. 
F. L. LIPMAN 
FRANK B. KING 
GEORGE GRANT 
W. McGAVIN 
E. L. JACOBS 



President 
Vice-President 
Vice-President 
Cashier 
Assist. Cashier 
Assist. Cashier 
Assist. Cashier 



Isaias W. Hellman 
Leon Sloss 
C. De Guignc 
Percy T. Morgan 
Dudley Evans 



DIRECTORS 
I. W. Hellman. Jr. 
Wm. Haas 

E. H. Harriman 
Wm. F. Herrin 

F. W. Van Sicklen 



James L. Flood 
H. E. Law 
J. Henry Meyer 
Chas. J. Deering 
F. L. Lipman 



Customers of this Bank are offered every facility con- 
sistent with prudent banking. 

New accounts are invited. 



Jolt 10, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



23 



($itffliiatt0 of % Sag 



Facts Versus 
Theory in Hawaii. 



The Good Roads movement, on ac- 
Good Roads Movement, count of the single-handed advocacy 
of the News Letter, is taking tan- 
gible shape in the State at large. Steps have been taken to mac- 
adamize, widen and to keep sprinkled fifteen miles of stage road 
from El Portal to the Sentinel Hotel in the Yosemite. The Gov- 
ernment authorities now have something like forty-five thousand 
dollars on hand for the improvement of the roads in the Yosemite. 
The probability is that, in the very near future, the Yosemite will 
have just as good roads as any in the Yellowstone, and the roads 
are perfect in that Government reserve. 

The above mentioned sum will be expended on the road from 
El Capitan bridge on the Merced to the Sentinel Hotel Bridge. 
This road will be twenty-one feet wide, and will be Telford mac- 
adam. It is expected by Major Forsyth, who has the work in 
charge, that enough money will be made available to complete the 
road to El Portal immediately, and to install a pipe line, hydrants 
and a sprinkling system. 

In Marin County there is a big boulevard project that is in the 
homing, and this, if built, will be the opening up of the country 
about Bolinas Bay. It is expected that this road will follow the 
ridge from Sausalito and that it will make available a magnificent 
country that is now practically beyond the reach of any one except 
foot-passengers. 

Directly due to the adverse criticisms of the News Letter, the 
trustees of the city of Mill Valley hired a capable engineer, a 
man who has had the valuable experience of supervision of 
roads in the most traveled part of Massachusetts, and, as a result, 
the city of Mill Valley has made a beginning on a system of 
splendid roads. Those in the heart of the business section have 
been so improved that the city now presents quite a metropoli- 
tan appearance. Attention later will be given to the roads in the 
hills, and by next spring the beautiful little town will have fine 
roads throughout the district under the supervision of the trus- 
tees and through the expenditure of the money provided for by 
bonds. Of course, the present work will by no means furnish 
the city with anything like a complete system of roads and 
bridges, but it will be perfection compared with the roads of this 
time last year, and it will be in the winter months that the 
good roads will be most appreciated. 

In addition to the road mentioned in Marin Countv. the 
Supervisors, Michael Burke and Louis C. Pistolesi. have come 
to realize that good roads are the highways of prosperity, and 
they have, together with A. W, Meyer and A. W. Foster, taken 
steps to provide lor a bond election that will take the stains of 

Mann as a county out of the back woods and give il as g 1 

thoroughfares as there are in the whole State. 

It is figured by engineers that it will cost $■?•.' I. o build 

fifty-five miles of macadamized road, twenty-fivi 
straighten out and widen this road at the same time. This can 
be done by increasing the tax rate in the district at a very low 
outlay of money. 

Already all the large property owners in the district, who pa] 
the majority of taxes, have Minified their intention of support- 
in- the measure, and it is argued that the farmers and 
of good horses will Bave the little extra tax several times over in 
the "ear and tear of their horses and vehicles. 



The Alameda Mole 
Boi i i \ LED. 



Alameda has long hern known as 
the city of California having tl. 
macadamised roads. The proj 
now being agitated for the building 
of a road the length of the narrow gauge mole, to the end that 
fry may be reached from Alameda without the long detour 
to Oakland, and also to furnish, the public with something that 
will be more than a mere boulevard. The project includes a 
speedway along the estuary. On this speedway might be held 
automobile races, and from it aquatic sports might be viewed 
to advantage. The railroad owns a right of way _ mole, 

but this only includes a given quantity of land on cither side of 
the track. Sufficient ground could be added inside the Govern- 
ment line to make a splendid boulevard. This boulevard would 
be an additional advantage to the Aiamedans to 
a splendid thorough fare on which to enter this verj heautifu 
home town. 



A writer in the Pacific Weekly, pub- 
lished in Honolulu, dwells acridly 
on the alleged failure of Christianity 
in the islands in competition with 
other creeds. He say9 in part: "Some ninety years ago, at Hie 
request of the Hawaiian monarch, a band of missionaries arrived 
in Honolulu bringing with them the Gospel of Christianity 
which the native sons and daughters of the mid-Pacific kingdom 
readily embraced. Today the sons and grand-sons of the earl] 
Christian missionaries have wonderfully converted these islands 
to Confucius, Buddha and Shinto. We have at least 80,000 dis- 
ciples of these religions in our midst. * * * Go throughout the 
islands and you will find a pagan temple, if not two, for every 
Christian house of warship." Again, seeking for the cause of 
the alleged decadence of Christianity, the writer designates the 
planters as largely responsible for it. He says : "In their greed 
for the Almighty dollar, our Christian planters are slowly but 
surely making Confucius, Buddha and Shinto masters where 
once Christ and his gentle teachings reigned." 

This is amusing. The planters of Hawaii may have many 
sins to answer for, but they are guiltless in this instance. The 
demands of commerce, and the development of the sugar industry 
of Hawaii, render it necessary that a large and abundant supply 
of labor be available. Oriental labor, in the competition, has 
proved itself most united for the work, and is naturally preferred. 
The planters have made numerous experiments with European 
immigrants, and as a whole, those experiments have proved un- 
satisfactory. In no tropical country is it expected that the 
Caucasian will continue long at hard physical labor. He is con- 
stitutionally incapable of it. For weeks past, paupers of Spanish 
descent have been at riving in San Francisco from Hawaii. Why, 
in the face of an unsatisfied demand for labor on every island in 
the group, is this so? The Spaniard is reputed, in the Canal 
Zone and elsewhere, to be the most capable white toilerunder the 
equatorial sun, and yet he prefers to land, a pauper, on the Coast 
seeking employment. Further comment is needless. 

As regards the decline of Christianity, it may be said that 
if the Hawaiians are not Christianized to-day, they never will be. 
On no spot of the earth's surface has so much missionary effort 
been expended for nearly a hundred years. A strange and signifi- 
cant commentary on the success which the missionaries have at- 
tained is to be found in the decrease of the natives, from a popu- 
lation numbering hundreds of thousands a century ago, to a 
paltry thousand to-day. 

As regards the Oriental, no one resident of the Far East for 
any length of time expects to witness them embrace Christianity 
to any extent. A Ee I here and a few there, mostly from motives 
of self-interest, may do so, but the mass are quite content to 
follow in the faith of then- ancestors. And we are quite will mil; 
thai they should. It may be brought to mind that the Oriental 
murderer of the polyandried Sigel woman in Xew York, and his 
associates also, are Sunday-school Chinamen. The while man 
who has lived any length of tune in the Orient, knows well the 

i Mongolian that embraces Christianity. They ari 
trusted by Oriental and Caucasian alike, and the few genuine con- 
lut serve to emphasise the general truth of the assertion. 

It is to be hoped some plan may be evolved by which satis- 
factory white labor, not only in Hawaii but in California, ma;. 
be secured; it is much to be desired that the Caucasian popu- 
lation of the islands be largely increased; but, if the islands 
must have Chine: rapanese plantation labor, let it have 

them rather as original heathens than as commercial "Chris- 
tians." Paradoxical though it may seem, they are better Chris- 
tians in their original roles as Confucians, Buddhists or Shinto- 
tan as "converts." endowed with a ""lively sense of favors 
lie." 



The fact that Japan has dropped out from the list of the 

icntial producers of antimony, and with the mi 
Prance, Austria. Italy and Bohemia giving evidence of depletion, 
indicates an almost immediate rise in the price of that metal, 
which at one time figured largely in California's metallurgical 
output. It is now quoted in the worlds markets 
a drop of from li' - from the prices of 1906, 

tion of the old prices, under the new methods of handling, would 
t the many now closed down properties in this State, and 
add materially to the development of sections where antimony 
abounds. 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1909 




INSVMGE 




The Nevada law requiring that all surety companies doing 
business in that State shall, after July 1st, keep on deposit Ave 
per cent of the total amount of which they are liable, on Nevada 
business, has lad the effect of withdrawing all the companies 
from that State, and one of the commonwealths of the Ameri- 
can union is to-day without fidelity or surety protection. For 
the privilege of writing less than -$7,000 in annual premiums, 
the companies must deposit the modest sum of $223,000. Seven 
surety companies wrote business in Nevada last year, receiving 
premiums amounting in the aggregate to $13536, distributed 
as follows: United States Fidelity and Guaranty Co., $6,638; 
Empire State Surety Co., $3,179; Aetna Indemnity Co., $1,178; 
.National Surety Co.. $772: American Surely Co., $394; Title 

Guaranty and Surety Co., $345; Fidelity and Casualty Co., $30, 
* * * 

A statement in the Insurance Law Journal, giving the results 
of its investigation as to death claims of life insurance com- 
panies resisted, is of interest. It has consulted the conn digests 
and finds the eases that get into court are about 1 to 2,000. 
Frequently agents meet- the argument that life companies eon- 
test too many claims. The conclusion' reached by this exhaustive 
investigation is that litigated claims are insignificant. No com- 
pany invites a law suit. It gives the claimant the benefit of 
the doubt rather than incur public prejudice. The fact is, that 

every honest claim is paid. 

* * * 

Credit insurance has not anywhere been, so far as we know, a 
marked success. The system, which some years ago was said to 
be well established and profitable in this country was com- 
plicated. There were so many rules, regulations, conditions, 
limitations and what not in those days that the system was on- 
suited to commercial life. How far the modern version of the 
system is acceptable, it is difficult, if not impossible, to ascertain. 
The results of the trading in that department are in no sing]'' 
ease published; its working is always hidden in accounts dealing 
with other and very different classes of business. 

* * * 

Since the repeal of the law compelling a deposit of $50,000 
by each. company for the special protection of Oregon policy- 
holders, fifteen fire insurance companies have been admitted to 
that State, and eight applications arc now pending the approval 
of the insurance commissioner. This justifies the promise made 
at the time the bill was discussed that the abolition of the de- 
posit would bring in many additional companies and relieve the 
shortage in insurance protection in Portland and other congested 
districts. 

* * * 

The Washington investigating committee lias reported to 
Governor Hays that former Secretary of State Nichols, as ex- 
officio insurance commissioner, charged insurance companies 
seeking admission to Washington from $50 to $200 each in ex- 
cess of the statutory fees for pretended examinations to determine 
their fitness for admission, and that this additional charge H is 
pocketed by both Nichols and his deputy, J. II. Si hively, who b is 

since been elected insurance commissioner, thi i :e hai ag been 

created by the recent Washington Legislature. Sehively is a 
severely arraigned for having accepted salary and commissions 
amounting to $2,500 for acting as president of the Pacific Live 
Stock Association, now defunct, while ai fine as deputy insurance 
commissioner and drawing a salary from the State. Ee 

eharged with having accepted a $300 fee as deputy insurance - 

missioner for examining the association while serving as its 
pn -elent. It looks like a bad mess. 

* * * 

gin & Bloom, of Spokane. Wash., have consolidated 
with the Hege Real Estate Company. — The Sun of Xew Orleans 
is now writing in California. — The local life association held no 
meeting in June.— Catton, Bell & Co. have moved to California 
street. — Manager H. H. Smith, of the Law Union and Crown, 
has returned from a two weeks' trip. — V. C. Driffield, a former 

manager, is in London.— The $1,200)000 born I from the 

New York Life on the Lick House block on Montgomery street, 



will not be used to further improve that property. — Manager 
Clarence M. Smith paid a visit to Southern California last week. 
— When last heard from, Manager George H. Tyson, who is mak- 
ing a Continental tour, was doing Paris. — Vice-President Fay- 
monville, of the Fireman's Fund, has resigned the presidency of 
the Fire Commission. — Second Vice-President John F. Roche, 
of the Pacific Mutual, will not leave the company until January 
1, 1910. — The new local building of the Metropolitan Life In- 

Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, $1,500,000 



Assets, $7,000,000 



California and Sansome Streets, 

San Francisco. California. 

Cash Capital, $200,000. Cash Assets. $629,181.18 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

Employers" Liability, Genera] Liability, Teams. Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Burglary. Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green. President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors— A. Borel, H. E. Bothln, Edward L. Brayton. John C. Cole- 
man. F. P. Deerlng. E. F. Green, James K. Moffltt, J. W. Phillips, 
Henry Rosenfeld. Adolph A. Son, William S. Tevls. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 422 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,462,739 

Total Cash Assets 6.865,877 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING. 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. Ltd. 

Of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

320 SANSOME STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

The Wesft Coa& Life Insurance Co. 

San Francisco, Cat. 



A strong, well managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
A«k any agent, or write the company for Bample of policy forms. 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Organized 1853. Cash Capital, $3,000,000 

Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 
anywhere In United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss 
by fire, lightning, wind storm or tornado. Indemnity for loss of rental 
income by fire or lightning. 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent. J. J. SHEAHAN, Ass't General Agent 
38 Sutter St., San Francisco. Cal. 

National Fire Insurance Company of Hartford 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

CAPITAL $1,000,000.00 

ASSETS 8,260.000.00 

SURPLUS TO POLICY HOLDERS 3.178.458.64 

McNEAR & WAYMAN, GENERAL AGENTS, 

National Building, San Francisco 



Roy C. Ward Jas. K. Polk Jas. W. Dean Geo. E. Billings 

Geo. E. Billings Gompany 

ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED 
ji2 California Street San Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 2283 



July 10, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



25 



surance Company on the hill will be ready for occupancy next 
month. — The Jefferson Fire people deny that the company has 
any intention of retiring from the Coast. — The Globe and Rut- 
gers Fire has entered British Columbia. — Lumber tires in British 
Columbia have been unusually heavy recently, and consequenl 
Loss large. -Duncan & Kchfisch are busy installing the Spring 
Garden in California.— American Surety opened offices in Los 
Angeles, July 1st. — The Indiana & Ohio Live Stock Ins. Co. is 
establishing agencies on the Coast. — The Northern Life, of Seat- 
tle, will probably come to California next year. — Life insurance 
companies are permitted to commence business in Washington 
with $50,000 paid in capital. — Seventeen new life insurance 
companies are said to be sprouting in Texas. — During the five 
celebrations of the Fourth of July, from 1903 to 1907, inclusive, 
21,520 persons were injured and 1,153 killed, according to sta- 
tistics just gathered. — A. C. Morgan, special agent for the Provi- 
dence-Washington, has had Oregon added to his field, and will 
make his headquarters in Portland. — Special agent George F. 
Stamford leaves the Westchester to go with the Fire Association. 
— Morris Behfisch, of the General Agency firm of Duncan & Reh- 
fisch, died at Niagara Falls of apoplexy on June 25th, while en 
route to Europe. — The Western of Pittsburg has abandoned the 
project of a Pacific Coast department. — Wheeler Bros., of Los 
Angeles, get the Sun of New Orleans. 



AT* 
n b 

• * Get 



E 3 ^** 



l3*^~ 



HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLERS 



Bear the script name of 

Stewart Hartshorn on label 



Get "Improved,' 

Wood Rollers 




no tacks required 

Tin Rollers 



John Kirby, Jr., President, of the Dayton Manufacturing 

Company, was unanimously elected president, of the National 
Association of Manufacturers at the convention in New York on 
May 19th. He succeeds J. W. Van Cleave. Mr. Van Cleave 
was presented by the Association with a bronze tablet commemo- 
rative of his administration, a ruby stick pin, and a check for 
$10,000, in token of "his heroic tight for industrial freedom as 
against trade union tyranny." Mr. Van Cleave is now in San 
Francisco. 



The Hawaiian edition of the Overland Monthly has 

Created a large demand in Honolulu and the smaller towns of 
the islands. The edition is in a fair way to be sold out. 



LIFE INSURANCE FURTHER REDUCED 7.')' THE 
PRUDENTIAL. 

Voluntary concessions aggregating over $20,000,000 additional 
benefits to Industrial policies already in force, and increasing the 
amount of benefits to all similar policies issued after July 1st, 
briefly states the effect of an important and Ear-reaching an- 
nouncement just made by the. Prudential Insurance Company 
through President John F. Dryden. 

For years it has been the practice of the Prudential to add to 
the benefits already granted to policy-holders, giving more in- 
surance than the contracts called for whenever experience has 
demonstrated that it could safely be done. Close and careful 
study is given every feature of the company's business. The 
gains made in different departments each year, the earning power 
of the company's assets, decrease in mortality, etc., as compared 
with what was expected, are all carefully scrutinized. In this way 
the Prudential is able from time to time to grant increased bene- 
fits to policyholders. 

According to the announcement just made, on all Industrial 
policies issued after July 1st the benefits will be increased by an 
amount averaging more than ten per cenl more insurance for less 
money than ever hitherto granted. 

In furtherance of this liberal practice, the Prudential has also 
made these concessions retroactive — that is, applicable to similar 
policies issued since the beginning of the year 1907, and in force 
on the 1st of Julv of ibis year, thus enabling holders of old poli- 
cies to share in the increased benefits granted to the new. 



Murine Is a Domestic Eye Remedy. 
Reliable Relief for Eyes That Need Care. Doesn't Smart. 



LOW RATES 
TO 



Alaska- Yukon - Pacific 

Exposition 



FOR ROUND TRIP TICKETS 


FROM 




SAN FRANCISCO 


$32.50 


SACRAMENTO 


32.50 


LATHROP 


32.50 


STOCKTON 


32.50 


TRACY 


32.50 


SUISUN 


32.50 


DAVIS 


32.50 


NAPA 


32.7S 


SANTA ROSA 


33.60 


CAL1STOGA 


33.95 



Greatlv reduced rates from other points in California. Tickets sold 

daily until September 30, and cover two months' trip going 

and coming via the famous 

Shasta Route 

of the 

Southern Pacific 



Stopovers going and coming. Many other routes at slightly higher 
rates for you to select from . 

Write or call on our nearest agent for full details of service, etc. 
or add r 

FLOOD BUILDING for information 



San Francisco News Letter 



Jolt 10, 1909 



AN UNQUALIFIED SUCCESS FROM THE START. 

Techau Tavern opened last Saturday evening in a blaze 
of glory. July 3d will always be a red-letter days to the bohemi 
ilori'c of San Francisco, for a more enjoyable occasion has never 
been devised for their delectation than by Mr. Carlton Wall and 
his associates. The heralded announcement of the opening 
brought a rush for reservations of tables and seats, and the 
rivalry was keen. The attendance was representative of the best 
San Francisco may present in beauty and chivalry, and the ton 
was there in force. Imagine a management that secures a Rigo, 
a gypsy who has stirred crowned heads with his playing, to en- 
tertain its patrons while at its meals with the romantic airs of 
Hungary. Of course, everybody was on the qui vive. 

Techau Tavern is original in its design, and the predominant 
note in the coloring is green and gold. It is most difficult to do 
justice in words to the beautiful ensemble of this model eating 
house of the elite. There is a certain dignity and grandeur to 
the place that is indefinably associated with coziness and with 
comfort. The picture that strikes the onlooker is that of a 
beautiful palace. The walls are set with mirrors, and the light 
effect by day and by night is perfect. Above is a balcony, and 
this is partitioned off into small compartments from which an 
open view is had of the floor below. 

Much of the success of the opening night and the simplicity 
ami perfection of detail in arrangement throughout, including a 
kitchen that is unsurpassed in the Wesl is due to the man- 
ager. Mr. A. 0. Morrison. Mr. Morrison has the entire man- 
agement of Techau Tavern, and he is well and favorably 
known here, and because of this esteem he may be congratulated 
in advance in the management of a great restaurant success. 
Mr. Morrison has been identified with Techau Tavern for many 
years: in fact, since its inception, under the old management. 

It was a revelation in the craft of managers to watch the deft 
way on the first night when the great crowd was handled, seated 
and catered to without a single hitch or one element of discord 
to mar a splendidly arranged evening of enjoyment. 

It is not at all necessary to dwell upon the culinary triumphs 
of the Techau cuisine. The local epicure testifies to that with- 



out the need of encomium from the lay man or woman. It is 
remembered that in the old days busy men came all the way from 
the wholesale district for the pleasure of the noon-day luncheon 
simply, and only because of its exquisite cookery. The condi- 
tions are even better now. Mr. Morrison has just returned 
from a trip to the East, where he visited all the newest and 
most modern kitchens, and as a result the Techau cuisine is up 
to date and perfect in every detail. The China, cutlery, glass- 
ware and chafing dishes are the finest in use in San Francisco, 
and an amusing rivalry took place between bon vivants to drink 
firsl the health of the manager and luck to the Tavern in the 
new glasses. Techau Tavern is bound to be Hie big show place 
in I be restaurant line for the Eastern visitor. 



THE NEW CLIFF HOUSE. 

What the Campanile is to Yeniec. the Cliff House is to San 
Francisco the most famous of its physical features. It is there- 
fore not indulging in exaggeration to say that the whole com- 
munity has been looking forward to the announcement that is 
here made, that the monumental structure, the third that has 
been reared en the precipitous rock which echoes back to the 
ocean the barking of our beloved seals, was thrown open to the 
public on Thursday evening. 

The new Cliff House will be under the management of John 
'tail, and will far surpass its predecessors as a resort for epicures. 

For lovers of scenery there are ample facilities, for now, on 
l lie face of the rock, there is a beautiful promenade, a concrete 
terrace above the breakers accessible to the public, where a brass 
band will play every afternoon between the hours of 3 and 5. 

On the floors above are banquet halls, private dining rooms 
and a ball-room. 

Arrangements have been made with the Auto Livery Com- 
pany and the Pacific Taximeter Company for special rate:- I'm 
the conveyance of people to and from the Cliff House, with no 
barge during the stay. 



The Overland Monthly for July, 192 profusely illustrated 

pages of Western literature, at all news-stands. 



FORD SUPERIORITY 

Demonstrated by winning 
Guggenheim Trophy 

New York 

to 

Seattle 

in 22 days, 55 minutes — 

winning over second 

car by 16 hours 

ROADSTER— 4 cyl., 20 H. P., 100 In- 
wheel base, magneto, top, gas lamps 
and generator, sells In San Francisco 
for $1030.00. Weight 1350. 

Touring car, same equipment and specifications $1065.00 This car arrived in Seattle with the original 
tires, not having a pundture in the two front wheels nor applying a pump to them on the trip. Hind tires 
intact but punctured on the way. No parts changed en route. The Ford method of light construction 
proven beyond question. Demonstration and delivery made immediately. Several good counties open 
for agencies. 

STANDARD MOTOR CAR CO. 

AGENTS FOR CALIFORNIA AND NEVADA 
Cor. Golden Gate and Van Ness Avenues San Franclsco , CaL 




July 10, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



27 




mowmii 



t^h^s^^^mf^ 






The week in autoniobiledoni has been full of quiet interest, 
and the Motor Hunt was in many instances the topic of con- 
versation. Owners of cars and agents talked over the possibili- 
ties of extracting enjoyment from such an event, and the fact 
that all motoring clubs in San Francisco have arranged to avoid 
having any meet or race of any kind on the date set, that is, the 
last Sunday in August, showed the car owners that the clubs 
were taking an interest in it, to the end that the big Motor Hunt 
may be a signal success. 

The rule that all cars must run at ordinary speed, and that 
any car exceeding the speed laid down in the laws of the State 
of California would be disqualified, seemed to appeal to the 
private owners of cars and to that rapidly-growing class of 
motor enthusiasts who do not believe in road negotiation at 
speed rates that prevent enjoyment and that endanger lives. 

Last week's issue of the News Letter contained the rules of 
the Motor Hunt in full, and these will be published again before 
the day of the Hunt. The map giving the course, which is laid 
in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties will be published next 
week. 

The section traversed is from Ocean View to Los Gatos and 
return, and will take in San Mateo, the Peninsula Hotel grounds. 
Redwood, Menlo, Palo Alto, Mountain View, Santa Clara, San 
Jose, and the points along the way. Control stations will be 
established all along the road, and as has been explained, these 
controls must be found. They will be arranged far apart or near 
together, as the case may be. No information will be given as 
to their location. The "quarry ear" will be easily identified and 
will stop on demand. 

The quarry car will follow the prescribed road except at one 
or two points which will be clearly shown on the map where 
the quarry car may leave the prescribed road I'm- (he hunters 
ami mi across in attempts In escape. This territory will !»• 
known as the sanctuary, and into it the hunters may not Eollow, 
but they may lay in wail. :is the quarry car musl be on the move 
ami back on the prescribed road again. The quarry car musl 
move continuously excepl when being identified, ami when de- 
livering quarry car to the contestant who has caught it. 

* * * 

At the Emeryville track, the Buick made itself proud with 
honors, ami (lie Mitchell, the Cartecar, the Comet, and the De- 
troit Electric came in for the plaudits -if the crowds and Eoi 
records made. The Buici ami the Cor i splendid exhibi- 

tion op a struggle Por first honors in .i race thai was run over 
;i most miserable i rack. While the race was interesting, on 
accouni of dust ami other conditions ii did nol 
of I he contestants anj records for fasl time. 

One evenl in which there was much interest was in the match 
between the two small i irs, the Rupmobile and the Cartecar. I: 

is said thai these two cars are the smallest ever entered in a race 

in California. Both cars m agreeable to look upon, ami are 
made on tine lines. This was the $1000 class and under, ami it 
seemed to he on this account that women ami people generally of 
the middle , lass « a sed ent bus asti ovei 

ddie Cartecar, a ne« aspirant to the public's favor, won. 

The Indian had it all its wav in the motorcycle ra - 

* * * 

accidents of ; ! iparl from those encountei 

them of a nature that class them in 
the avoidable kind. Most of them are due to bad roads 
iency in repair force in the various counties of th 
the ease of Air. Herman Shainwald is in point. Had the 
-lightest regard for the maintenance of a perfect road been re- 
garded, such an accident had been impossible. Hei 

along at a fast speed hut not at i racing clip and with an 
ordinarily decent road, such an accident would have been im- 

possibli \ slight rut which is allowed to remain in ft 
is encountered, and the occupants of the ear are sent to destruc- 
tion or crippled and the car is demolished. There have been 
enough losses entailed, enough costs piled up through bad roads 



in the last year to have kept all of the roads in California in 
prime condition and have money left over. 

The friends of Mr. Shainwald have expressed the greatest of 
sympathy for him. ami they are gratified to know that a strong 
constitution is enabling him to recover very quickly from the 
effects of being thrown thirty feet and landing on very hard 
ground. 

* * * 

Mr. Cowan, manager of the Hughson Merton Company, in the 
pride of possession of a Ford automobile of the same character 
as the one that won the oeean-to-ocean race from New York lo 
Seattle last week, was driving along Sutter street last week when 
his reverie was interrupted by a view of an exquisitely gowned 
woman. Instinctively, he made in the direction of the Nell 
Brinkley figure, clad in clinging folds of pongee silk, and, when 
he had passed clean through a plate glass window of the White 
House and had demolished the wax model who had so charmed 
him, he was rudely awakened from his dream of love and auto- 
mobiles by being presented with a bill by the White House de- 
manding pay for the broken plate glass to the tune of $400. Mr. 
Cowan's friends, up to this time, had no knowledge of such ex- 
treme susceptibility to the attractions of pongee silk and curves. 
It is the most expensive case of goo-goo eyes on record. 

* * * 

The new Hudson car is the product of a factory operated 
by several of the oldest and best-known automobile men 
in America. This machine, unlike other cars formerly selling at 
a price under one thousand dollars, embodies many features 
which are usually found only in the structural end of cars cast- 
ing from $2,000 to $10,000, viz : three speed selective type trans- 
mission, I beam front axle, water cooling system and large 32 
inch wheels. 

The following telegram is self-explanatory: 

New York, JuLy 6, 1909. 
Mr. Calvin ('. Eib. care Pioneer Automobile Co», 901 Golden 

(late avenue. San Francisen. 
Demonstrating Hudson Runabout going forward lo you by ex- 
press to-day. (Jreatest value ever oU'ered less. than fifteen hundred 
dollars. Car powerful, fust and material, workmanship excellent. 
Have ordered five hundred. Should sell one hundred before 
September 1st. Price nine hundred astounding. 

E. P. Brutegab. 

* * * 

'the dealers are all interested in results at Santa Monica in 

the races taking plan' to-day, and motor enthusiasts arc waiting 
for news of the entrants in the >j r ace. There are numcr- 

OUS entrants with favorite ear-, and this road race will be a big 

test el readability of the various makes thai stand as favorites 
with dealers and with miner-. There is more interest man 
in tin- than in any tin- year, and many San Francis-- 

cans are mi the ground, having down South through the « 
in he on the ground ai s una Monica. 
'the San Francisco Motor Club has finally turned down the 

idea of a tire contest, and this moot question may now 1 

sidered settled, as far as tie- club is concerned. The 
committee of the club will n or Bome kind oi a con 

-i. Johnston ami Tonj Nichols are now hob-nobbing with 

a \i w lo making plans for something next month. 




■Whatever model Speedwell you buy— Roadster. Touring 
Car or Baby Tonneau. you get the same marvelous 
40-45 H. P. engine on a car that is perfect in every de- 
tail — '"the bes't that can be built" — completely equipped, 
except top. at S26SO. 

Speedwell Motor Car Company 



of California 



Phone Market 6 U 51 



489 Golden Gate Avenue 



38 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1900 



Beautiful 

Paraiso Hot Springs 

The Mecca for AutomobiMs 



New Auto Boulevard from Soledad 
to the Springs. Roads in first-class 
condition from Oakland to Paraiso. 
Special Rates; care and attention 
paid to motor parties. New Garage. 
Supplies, gasolene, oils and repairs 
at city prices. 



Most wonderful natural hot mineral 
waters and baths on the Coast. The 
only HOT SODA baths in California 
positively guaranteed to cure rheu- 
matism, gout, malaria, liver, kidney 
and stomach troubles. 



Mineral waters awarded first prize 
at St. Louis Exposition. Climate 
unexcelled. Rates $12.00 to $16.00, 
baths included. 



Train leaves 3rd and Townsend at 
8 a. m. connecting with AUTOMO- 
BILE at Soledad, arriving at Springs 
for lunch. 



Booklets at Peck's, 789 Market St.; Bryan's, 2004 Sutter St., 
San Francisco,or H.H. McGowan, Paraiso, Monterey Co.,Cal. 



Honk! Honk! 

Throw her into the high for the 

Third Annual 

JficheUs 

Jubilee 
At San Jose 



Saturday 



July 10, 1909 



Hill Climb 2 P. M. 

Prize for every Starter 

Banquet --"..- 7 P. M. 

Mitchell owners will be the guests of the 

MITCHELL MOTOR CAR COMPANY 



The Southern dealer? will have ihe time of their lives at the 
Santa Monica road race. The details have been elaborated, and 
there is no doubt whatever of the success. of the races. 

A number of the dealers have waited until the last moment, 
to the inability of their factories to gel cars out in them 
for the race on July 10th. 

The course is being put into the best possible condition, and 
lere of the committee who went over the roads lately say 
that they are well pleased with what lias been dune, and their 
shape generally. 




Automobile roads from Jfiles to Santa Cruz, and side trips 
to Qih oy and other points. 

* * * 

Arrangements for the third annual Mitchell jubilee, the re- 
union of Mitchell owners, are now practically made, and every- 
thing points to a great success. The affair is scheduled for San 
Jose on July 10th. G. Vernon Rogers, secretary of the Mitchell 
Motor Car Company, has announced the list of officials who will 
hue charge of the hill climb which will take place at Alum Rock 
Park, San Jose. The judges are: A. H. Marten, George B. Pol- 
hemus and Dr. I\. L. Benepe. B. 1J. l'Hommedieu will start the 
cars. 

The events have been divided into several classes, so that there 
will be chances for all models of cars, and for both professional 
and amateur drivers. The owners of Mitchells will arrive at 
San -lose, going to Osen & Hunter's garage at 1 p. m. 

The hill climb will start at '.' p. m„ and, upon completion, the 

Mitchell owners will hold their annual banquet at the Hotel Ven- 

dome at 7 o'clock, when an extensive programme "ill be given. 

N, up of the best professional performers in the State having been 

obtained for the occasion. 



July 10, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



39 



The Pierce Arrow Sales Company 

330-340 Van Ness Avenue 

DISTRIBUTORS 
PIERCE ARROW MOTOR CARS 



1910 



1910 



Will be pleased to extend you every courtesy in their new home. 

Our business policy is clean-cut and unequivocal — we tell you what we ian do and 
do it. 

Our aim is to place selling automobiles to the public on the plane of legitimate 
commercialism. 

Our treatment is in keeping with the car we represent — high class — on the square. 

Those assertions are unnecessary to those who know us — to those with whom we 
are unacquainted our statements may serve as worthy of permitting an introduc- 
tion. 

■|'l„. | a te8j models— those to be known m "1 919" — embodying distinctive features 
making For the adaptability of the motor ear to present exacting requirements — are 
ready tor production at the factory. Our specifications are entered, and the cars 
are in work preparatory to the consummation of our promises of early deliveries 
in S:m Francisco. We have complete data covering designs, details and deliveries. 
It w iii be " - 1 "u this information either at the above address or by 

calling on yon personally to meet your convenieni 

in all. the reliability of the "PIERCE ARROW" is coupled with equipmenl 

the comple: which is appreciable. 

I„ . ..tor car it is natural to seek intrinsic value commensurate with 

the investmen) >u will find this and more in the 

PIERCE ARROW CAR 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1909 



1910 Models 
Stevens-Duryea 




Model Y. Six Cylinder, Forty H. P. 



Over four years' 
consistent six- 
cylinder successes 



Pacific Motor Car Company 

1310 Franklin St., Oakland 380 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Manufactured by Stevens-Duryea Co., Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

Members Association Licensed Automobile Manufacturers 




If you would consider ex- 
treme comfort and silence 
in your car you should 
consider the Peerless for 
1910 :: :: :: :: :: 



H.O.HARRISON CO. 



The Man in the Automobile Business. 

There is no doubt whatever that the thought of the human race 
has been on motor vehicles for road purposes ever since there was 
a dream of power. Six hundred years ago Boger Bacon prophe- 
sied in the plainest way the use of power vehicles on land, in the 
water and in the air. As the art of enginery developed, every 
man who made a motor thought of its application to a road vehi- 
cle. In the thirties of the last century there were steam vehicles 
on the road. The gas engine was indefinitely old at this time. 
Finally there came a time when it was seen that the engine 
had to be blended into a road motor vehicle in such a way as 
to leave the vehicle free for its ordinary uses, and that nothing 
could be done until the right, sort of engine, for such purpose, 
was i'ound. Thenceforth the many centuries long dream of the 
best speculative, scientific and mechanical minds of history be- 
came a practical reality. 

Just as the problem attracted for ages the attention of high- 
class men, so the commercialization of the road locomotion idea 
has, since the beginning of the industry something over ten years 
ago, drawn to its sphere many of the most able and public- 
spirited men of our country. These men feel instinctively that 
the automobile is a symbol of progress, a levener and developer of 
civilization, having a utility function co-extensive with civiliza- 
tion itself. They have not failed to see, or shirked the burden 
consequent upon, the great amount of labor necessary to the up- 
building of the industry, work on broad lines, often against the 
opposition of deep-rooted prejudice, always against the tremen- 
dous force of inertia for leaving things as they are. They have 
stood for integrity in business methods. They have brightened 
the hum-drum of common life in many ways, as in the beautiful 
custom of giving automobile outings to orphans and afflicted 
children. 

As examples of the type of men in the automobile industry, we 
may take the general managers of fhe Association of Licensed 
Automobile Manufacturers, cf whom there have been four. 

George H. Day, who largely deserves the credit for the organi- 
zation of the A. L. A. M., was its first general manager. He 
was. a born diplomat, whose untimely death deprived the auto- 
mobile industry of one of its most able and forceful elements. He 
was affable, dignified and endowed with an admirable person- 
ality, and a charming manner, joined with such unusual business 
ability as to leave a life work of enduring character, such as 
highly successful co-operation along many lines among asso- 
ciated automobile manufacturers and mechanical standards of 
automobile construction. Mr. Day was efficiently assisted by 
Mr. Marcus I. Brock (now manager of the E. R. Thomas Motor 
Cab Company), who left the learned profession of the law to 
go into motor affairs several years ago. Mr. Brock is consistently 
democratic, a great believer in his fellow man and in the future 
of the motor car, of which he is a faithful and keen-sighted 
student. 

Elihu H. Cutler, who succeeded Mr. Day, was also a man of 
large business experience, having been identified with the de- 
velopment of the automobile industry from many advantageous 
executive points. In early life he was successful in the grain and 
milling business. He then went into the electric elevator busi- 
ness, also with marked success. He is of a mechanical turn of 
mind, and has had much experience in patent matters. 

The third general manager of the A. I.. A. M. was Milton J. 
Budlong, now president of the Packard Motor Cat Co., of New 
York. He is one of the best-known men in the trade, and a man 
of great native ability, whose experience in the automobile field 
dates from its inception. For a number of years he was President 
of the Electric Vehicle Company, succeeding George H. Day in 
that position. 

E. P. Chalfant, who has just retired as general manager of 
the A. L. A. M., has won fame as a driving business man, and 
incidentally as a sportsman ; and has a strong personal follow- 
ing. He has now become associated in an executive capacity 

with the Packard Motor Car Company, of Detroit, his ambil 

being along manufacturing and selling lines. He was originally 
in the insurance business, from which lie went into the bicycle 
field, having been a well-known bicycle racer. For a linn he was 
engaged in the management of electric railroads. He entered 
the new empire of motordotn some years ago. His work with the 
licensed association deservedly won him many friends, and he 
leaves the association after accomplishing ranch good work for 
the association, the industry and the sport. 



July 10, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



31 



See That Seal 
Is Not Broken 





Have You Been Getting PANHARD? 

"The Oil in the Checker-Board Can" 

There is no longer room for doubt. The New Sealed 
Can insures the purchaser against substitution of 
inferior grades. • 

PANHARD OIL Will Save 1-2 Your Repair Bills 

It does not carbonize and does lubricate 

Let us recommend the grade suited to your engine. 

L. H. & B. I. BILL, Coasit Distributers 

132 Valencia Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Pathfinding Tires 

The E.-M.-F. Official Pathfinding Car 
for the Glidden Tour is equipped with 



MORGAN & WRIGHT TIRES 



They chose these tires in spile of the mosl generous induce- 
ments offered by other tire manufacturers. lOne concern 
offered $1000 in cash and an unlimited supply of tires free.) 
Furthermore. THEY ACTUALLY BOUGHT AND PAID FOR 
THIS TIRE EQUIPMENT, with no other inducement than Un- 
known quality of the tires. It was a choice based solely upon 
experience. 



About a year ago the K.-M.-F. Company after thoroughly 
investigating the merits of all the tires on the market, ehose 
Morgan & Wright tires as standard equipment. The fact 
that they stick to them on this important run is eonrlusiw 
proof that the tires have MADE GOOD. 



Much depends on this run. AND THEY HAVE CHOSEN THE 
TIRES THEY ARE SIRE OF. 



Wein&ock Nichols Company 

Northern California and Nevada Distributors 



AUTO LIVERY 
COMPANY 

Agents for the famous 

APPERSON CARS 



Salesrooms and Garage: N.W. corner 
Van Ness and Golden Gate Avenues. 
The finesl: livery service in the West. 



Ring up FRANKLIN 1535 



Bargains in second hand cars of various makes 




569 Golden Gate Ave.. San Francisco 



Phone Market 6000 



JONES 

Speedometer 



The JONES is THE speedometer which made the speedometer 
business. 

It's the Pioneer with 10 years of "Knowing how" to back it. 

UNFAILING RELIABILITY is the rock upon which the 
JONES reputation stands. 

ABSOLUTE ACCURACY— "Accurate to a whisper." is respon- 
sible for its preference by ALL motorists who want to KNOW 
how fast and how far they are travelling. 

When you consider the nicety and care with which the JONES 
is constructed — when you realize the proven excellence of its 
principle — you then know why there are FOUR Jones Speed- 
ometers in actual use. to ONE of any other make. 

Put a JONES oh your dash and took the TRl'TH in the face?" 

JONES SPEEDOMETER DEPT. United Manufacturers Inc. 

Broadway A 764b St.. NEW YORK 
Chinslor & Lyon Motor Supply Co. Los Angeles San F r a - 



38 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1909 



The Peer of All! 



DEMAND 



PLANET AU Ts B,LE 



TAKE NO SUBSTITUTE 

Bass-Hueter Co. 



816 Mission Street 

Adapted to Every Machine 

"Fricftion Costs More Than Lubrication" 



Distributors 



ARRIVED 



1910 



1910 



The Autocar 

4 cyL 30 H. P. Type XX Light Touring 
Car, J1900, t o. b. San Francisco 



Bosch Double Ignition System. Come in and see the 
first of the new season's models. 

Walter C. Morris, 

TeL Franklin 3777. 640 VAN NESS AVE- 





REO 


£t 


0&frar&~!ayi0n 




J. W. LEAVITT & CO. 


Golden Gate Ave., cor. Hyde St. Phone Market 411 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF REPAIRING AUTO 
LAMPS, RADIATORS AND FENDERS AT SHORT 
NOTICE. Phone Market 751 




METAL SPINNING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 



T A X I C A B S 

(Genuine RENAULT Cars) 
PACIFIC TAXIMETER CAB COMPANY 

Solicits your patronage of its equipment of imported 
Renault Taxicabs and will show its appreciation by 
prompt and reliable service. * * * * 

TELEPHONE 

FRANKLIN 4848 

Private Exchange connecting all Departments 

MAIN STATION AND GENERAL OFFICES, 1355-63 BUSH STREET 

FAY C. BEAL. General Manager. 



With considerably over one thousand of its six-cylinder cars 
in successful operation on the road, and the demand for them 
greater during the past season than the immense new factory 
could supply, the Pierce-Arrow Motor Car Company has an- 
nounced that for the coming season it will manufacture nothing 
but six-cylinder cars. 

A number of considerations have been responsible for this de- 
cision, the first of these being the unqualified success that has 
attended the use of the cars under all conditions to travel by 
owners. Another is that the indications for the coming season 
are that the demand for six-cylinder cars of this make will be 
so great as to engage the entire work of the factory to the exclu- 
sion of other types. 

The coming season will be the fourth in which the Pierce- 
Arrow Motor Car Company has made six-cylinder cars, although 
it. is the first in which it has confined its output to this class. The 
first six-cylinder cars of this make were placed on the market in 
the latter part of 1906. In that year one model was made. One 
of these cars was entered in the Glidden Tour as a non-contest- 
ant in order to give it the hardest and most thorough test pos- 
sible. The car was subjected to much greater hardships than 
any contesting car, and at the end of the tour showed a mileage 
of almost double that of the tour itself. By this proof of general 
efficiency and dependability. this performance paved the way for 
the adoption of the six-cylinder motor by a large number of 
motor car users which has resulted since in their widespread 
popularity by those who want a car for year around work under 
all road and weather conditions. 

It would be a rather difficult mutter to overestimate the sig- 
nificance of the announcement of the Pierce-Arrow Company. It 
would seem to indicate that this company, one of the pioneers in 
the industry, in making nothing but six-cylinder cars, has found 
that its experience has cancelled the last doubt in the mind of 
the public as to the advantages of the six over any other type of 
motor. 

For the coming season, the company will make three cars, a 
thirty-six horsepower, a forty-eight and a sixty-six horse power, 
all of which will be fitted with runabout, miniature tonneau tour- 
ing and enclosed bodies. 

* * * 

These are the days of long automobile trips. Doctor Charles 
Ford, the osteopath, has just returned from a trip made in his 
Thomas Flyer to Seattle. He made the trip of eleven hundred 
miles t" the big exposition in leisurely time, and was gone five 
weeks, returning by train, and shipping his car. The up trip was 
made throughout without a single mishap to machinery and with- 
out a stoppage of any kind due to the car. Doctor Ford enjoyed 
his vacation immensely, and reports the exposition as one of the 
very best. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Putnam, of Berkeley, returned a few days ago 
from ;i three weeks' trip to Porterville in their Oldsmobile. The 
party had a most enjoyable time, and the roads this side of 
Fresno, through Tracy and the Livermore Valley, are in splendid 
condition. Rough going was encountered between Fresno and 
Porterville. where the road is in wretched shape. They made 
the trip to Fresno the first day, which proves Mr. Putnam a very 
consistent driver. Others in the party were Miss I la Putnam, 
Miss Knutt and Mr. Reginald Knutt. 

* * * 

L. H. Demurs, of Sacramento, returned lately from Coalinga 
in his 1^09 sixty horse-power Thomas. Mr. Demurs spent sev- 
eral days touring in the oil field district, and reports that the 
time he made from Oakland to Coalinga via San Benito, a dis- 
tance of three hundred miles, was eleven hours and thirty min- 
utes. This he considers a wonderful performance. Mr. Demurs 
owns two Thomas caTS. 

* * * 

Mr. F. H. Newlove, of Rio Grande, secured delivery from Mr. 
L. V. Lynch, of the local agency, of the Speedwell car that is 
probably the finest ever delivered, as it has every convenience in 
equipment that can possibly be imagined by man. It is a mag- 
nificent machine, and the owner is proud of his acquisition. 

* * * 

The suggestion is made that the several automobile clubs of 
the city be brought into an association or consolidation. The 
idea is that this merger would tend to make the clubs a more 
efficient fighting force for good roads and more potent as a Factor 
in securing honest legislation. 



.Idly 10, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



33 



Si Perkins' Store, si:iiin,i Soakum County. 

July I. 1909. 
Editor News Letter — Dear Sir: I am riliif you to let you kno ! 
what the fisical condition of Spaghetti Ded Rotti is, since his 
arrest by that Society of Prevention of Croolty to Animals guy. 
Old Ded Rotti tried to get 'munity, tried to turn traitor aginst 
the otlier traitors, but that lawyer guy would nut stand for his 
game, so old Ded got down on his knees and solemn promised 
if that San Francisco Motor Club lawyer would let him go on 
his 0. Pi. that he, Spaghetti Ded Rotti, the one mean sneakin' 
dog in the manger, a Supervisor of Soakum County, would vote 
with the other members of the Honorable Board on a proposi- 
tion to issue bonds to improve the roads (such as they are) of 
Soakum County, an' you hav kno doubt red in the noospapers 
that the Board is agitatin' good roads in Soakum County now. 
Now old Ded Rotti at hart oncet ment to do the rite thing by 
his fellermen, but he wus kinder under obligations to them other 
guys up there in the woods who raised so meny hosses, an they 
says to him that he must nock out them automobiles so they 
could git a good price fer ther stock an' he kinder bein week 
in the hed, an' havin' no mind of his own, 'lowed them to run 
him, but since he has been taut by that lawyer guy that other 
peeple hev rites in these United States besides Soakum County 
dagoes, he kinder got onto hisself an' says now that he reckons 
he is not livin' in Sisily, an' old Garibaldi ain't ruunin' this 
here county nohow; an' then when that smooth-faced insurance 
guy called Bill dinger comes up tofore the Board and says 
they ought to go to the meetin' of them there good roads fellers 
down in Montray County, old Ded was bitterly opposed to spend- 
in' any money to go to that there man Hcrreman's hotel down 
there an' lern how to spend honest money on honest roads, an' 
he says right away "no," an' the other guys on this Honorable 
Board kinder nods ther heds in a kinder "I'm with ye" stile, 
an' old Ded says to them auto fellers, we ain't goin' to 'cept yer 
invite to go to Del Monte an' listen to Mike de Kronikle and 
Mantcrn Martop talkin' to undressed pullets 'bout good roads 
when they never broke any rocks or paid road taxs in ther Uvea. 
So just about this time there comes thet big fat feller what says 
he is the ritin' guy or some kind of sectare of the S. F. M. C. I 
believe his name is Jonson. Well, he says, Mr. Honorable Rotti 
we want you to meet us at them hot air springs iu Paraiso on 
dune the 19th, A. D., '09, an' we'll see that you will be treeted 
rite, an' old Ded kinder blushes an' stammers a tittle, an' he 
says, Mr. Jonson, I'm skeered my karborretter aiu't workin' rite, 
an' Jonson says, Oh, you jest git a Btormberg an' wu'll than 
along all rite. So oil' he goes an' gets his old woman to pad 
carpet sack, an' sure enuf, down he goes to them s|iiin^>. an' 
when he gets ther, in 'bout six hours, he looks round and says, 
hev we got to Mill Valley alredy? an' just then he looks 'round 
an' sees them fellers whal belongs to that San Francisco \l 
Club, an' he says, I'm in hell sure, bo he Jim goes on a run fer 
the tall timber, an' he runs up aginsi a big geeser what is 
bekewing a beef with a pitchfork in his nan', an' old Ded - 
this must be the devil sure; then ho ruin lurk an' sees B » 
lot of them auto guys with trunks on like they wus wild 
in Indiana, an" be gets excited an' climes up a i- 
when the dogs wus chasin' him kinder tight, an' just then, 
them Indians sees him an' shakos him tree an' 

him to the swimmin' pool, an' the follerin 1 is what he sea he sa« : 
That feller called Romero Blunando Nelson dimes up on 
of a ten story bath house an' jumps rite down in the pool an' 
swims like a Soakum County duck; then ther,' wus that feller 
called donas Wilharr l.eaveit who was puffin' an' splutterin' 
in the water like a Reo elimbin' the Fillmore street hill, an' 

jus! then Bumbody thros that six-cilender feller called Hornory 
Lost Owesnei back formoel rite on top of Crispin Inters 
Buckbart, an' he kinder gets mad an' sponte an' nearly 

springlea the blame farm, an' just then in falls thet guy what is 
called Rathorford Ferankel Tomson who sells them French ruber 
tirs. hut don't llv any kites an' tell lies only sometimes, an" he 
kinder gets skeered an' pulls thet other hot air rubber guy in. 
I believe his name is Alfonso Logorismo Lenard; he is all the 
time spoutin' 'bout takin" his rims olT with yer fingers. An' 
Monogram de Saint Klair Jo- 
an' then there wus a CUppli -aoutm' a 
all the time. Ther names wus Lyon Karlv an' I 
riageat, what wus kinder atraw-bossen the guv what call 

the Hostelry. Well, when old Ded saw what ;ired 

bunch of guys them fellers wus. be just takes his ami 



jumps rite in feet first: then he gets a soda bath an' wl 
comes out he looks into the Lookin' glass to lind the! be has been 

bleeched out, an' reely looked like a bonnett Eemal after she'd 

spilled about a hat gallon of proxide over her countenans. lie 
soil (hem fellers told him they wus goin' to lill his old kari a 
the Barbakew. an' throwed barbakewed beef, beans an' beer in 
his face ontil his hide looked like a Roughsolito porpoose. fie 
sed them fellers told him they wus goin' ot fill his old karcuss 
wunst for luck anyhow, an' old Ded sez he plaid baseball all af- 
ternoon so as to coax his stumick to grind up thet ther Barbakew 
fillin. 

Old Ded also sez he danced all nite at the shindig what wus 
giv in oner uv them club fellers, an' low down he kinder reckons 
he wus the chief squeez in the krowd, an' when them fellers 
starts fer 'Frisco, they puts him in the tail end automobile an' 
makes him eat up all the dust in the Salinas Valley, an' then 
they strikes them good roads whats been watered down, an' 
when he gets to the first stoppin' place he kinder sez to that 
lawyer guy, Mr. Statute Man, if yu will fix me up sum ritins 
fur good roads, I will run the MafDer gang in Soakum County in 
the footur, and do what I ken fer tin's here club fer the rite 
kind of roads; an' sure nough, somethin's been dooin' ever since 
in this here county of Soakum fer good roads. 

OFd Ded sed to me he wus like that man Adam wus when he 
wus askd how he wud like to come to erth wunst more, an' old 
Adam sed he'd like to come, an' he be willin' to turn over a 
noo leaf. Old Ded sed be is tired of eatin' some of the same 
,shoat what the other guy stole, when old Ded was settin' on 
this jury what tried the guy fer stealin' the shoat. 

Old Ded an' his pals hav' learned thet it kinder pays to "do 
onto tothers as you would want tothers to do you,'' an' them's my 
kind of eentiments, too. Yours fer good roads. 

Jim Squeezem, J. P. 



Chalmers-Detroit "30" 



The beginning and the end car. 

In the beginning the initial price is slightly 
higher, in the end the upkeep and after expense is 
much less. 

•ANYBODY CAN CUT PRICES BUT IT TAKES 
BRAINS TO MAKE A BETTER ARTICLE." 

(Elbert Hubbard.) 

Buying a good car is only one sTep in the right 
direction. 

BUT 

Buying a good car from the most reliable dealers 
on the Pacific Coast is your absolute assurance of 
satisfaction. 

The Pioneer Automobile Company is the largest 
concern west of Chicago giving its undivided at- 
tention to the sale of automobiles. Ten years in 
business assures our stability and perpetuates our 
guarantees. Our business motto is "Right or 
Made Right." 



The PIONEER AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 



Oakland 



901 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
San Francisco 



Fresn 



Durocar 



"Never anyone, anywhere will make 
a better one" 



Durocar Automobile Company 



of San Francisco 



489 Golden Gate Avenue 



34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1909 



C. F. Fisher, of the California Saw Work.-;, lias just completed 
an unusual trip through the logging camps and shingle mills ol 
California and Oregon in his little Buiek White Streak, and 
considers that he has accomplished a feat that will not he dupli- 
cated soon. The entire distance for the trip, which consumi 
six weeks, was slightly over 4,200 miles, or an average of l"" 
miles per day. "When the character of the roads over whir i 
we traveled is taken into consideration." said Mr. Fisher, in 
speaking of his trip, "it really and unmistakably is worthy of 
comment, and the little car is certainly a wonder, deserving the 
keenest admiration. We traversed the entire lumber districts 
of California and Oregon, and it would he hard for one lo im- 
agine such awful roads even in this rough and wild mountainous 
region. One puncture, resulting from the picking up of a nail. 
furnished the only cause for one moment's delay on our entire 
trip." 

Another run of some length in a Buick White Streak is that 
of P. R. Weimnann, Coast Superintendent of Agencies, lor the 
California Insurance Company, who has just returned to San 
Francisco, concluding his second extended trip over the State 
Weinmanu reports a most pleasant trip, free from troubles of 
any character, his speedometer indicating that he had traveled 
3218 miles since leaving San Francisco. On the 10th, Weinmann 

will leave for Tahoe. and expects to be gone about two weeks. 

* * * 

The little town of Mill Valley is spending forty-live thousand 
dollars in making good roads. The square around the depot. 
that was always in a. disgraceful condition in the past, is now 
a metropolitan plaza. The expert in charge is building concrete 
bridges over the creeks, and the main entrance to the town will be 
by a splendid highway, over which the automobile may spin 
along without danger of being submerged in rotting saw-dust 
or thrown high in the air by humps and hummocks. It will take 
some time before the roads are completed, but good progress has 
been made thus far, and later on the roads, leading into hills and 
the residence sections, will be repaired and macadamized. Sonic 
time ago we had occasion to criticise the little town rather harshly 
for the bad condition of the roads. We take the present occasion 
to compliment the trustees on their quick response to the adverse 
criticism by the practical work done. Keep it up ! 

* * * 

Recently the White Xortons left for a month's outing in their 
Chalmers-Detroit. They will go direct to Los Angeles, and mak- 
ing that their headquarters, will lake short tours into the sur- 
rounding-country. Mr. and Mrs. Norton, Miss May, Frank and 
White Norton, made up the party. 



Ivan L. de Jongh 



High grade automobile repairing. 
Holley high-tension magnetos. 
Stewart and Holley Carburetors installed. 
Storage Battery charging. 



446 FULTON STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



.1. E. Adams, of Adams & Miiler, owners of the famous ''Lucky 
l J >oy"' mine, Hawthorne, Nevada, is spending a few days in this 
city. Mr. Adams is also interested in (be development "of auto- 
mobiles, inasmuch as he use- a ear lor work in developing this 
property, a- well as other mine- throughout the State. His 
favorite ear is the Thomae Flyer, which be has driven over sixty 
thousand miles in the last twelve months, lie says that in mak- 
ing long trips ol' 150 to 200 miles, be (irst makes up a schedule, 

and is always on time. 

* * * 

Minneapolis police on the motorcycle squad arc now in full 
operation, having passed the apprenticeship stage. Their 
machines are said lo possess suffii tent power lor negotiating a 
speed of 60 miles an hour, and the operators are determined to 
overtake motorists exec. ling the -peed limit. It is therefore 
urged on all motorists that, unless their machines can exceed 
this aforesaid specified motorcycle speed, or unless they can de- 
pend upon some friendly dog to intercept the motorcycle cop in 
his wild chase, they should earnestly endeavor to keep within 

the maximum rah' of speed allowed by the city ordinance. 

* * * 

C. F. Splitdorf, of New York, the well-known maker of igni- 
tion apparatus, is breaking ground I'or a large addition to bis 
already spacious factory. Although working day and night, 
i he present Eactory is unable to handle the volume of business 

that trade conditions demand. 

* * * 

Mr. .T. W. Seawell, of Healdsburg, on Wednesday, purchased 

a model K Pullman touring car ol' the Frank (i. Renstrom Co. 
Delivery will lie made within a Few days. Mr. Seawell expects to 
do considerable touring in his new machine during the summer. 




Moore 
Motor 
Supply 
Company 



Distributors for 
Monogram Oil 



VAN NESS AND GOLDEN 
GATE AVENUES. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

OAKLAND 
LOS ANGELES 



.In.Y in. 1909 



and California Advertiser 






Although the Pierce-Arrow Motor Car Company of Buffalo 
uever has maintained a team of professional drivers for contests, 
it is a Eacl (li.ii il has been uniformly successful in the classes of 
contests it has entered endurance runs and hill climbs. This year 
will mark ho exception to this custom, since, for the Glidden lour 
in which tour cars are entered, the drivers and mechanics have 
been chosen from all parts of the country. In fact, only one of 
the men comprising the rutin' list is connected directly with the 

factory, this driver being Walter Winchester, who will pilot i 

of the touring ears. 

It would be hard to find a group of men with more widely seg- 
regated homes, in fact, than the eight wdio will have the Pierce- 
Arrows in charge in the Glidden tour this year. No two of them 
come from the same city. Some have had experience in A. A. A. 
tours before, but others have not. 

Two six-cylinder -18 h. p. Pierce-Arrow touring cars will com- 
pete for the glidden trophy. Forbes S. Dey, of Kansas City, will 
drive one, with E. M. Grady, of Denver, as his mechanic, while 
Walter- P. Winchester, of Buffalo, will pilot the other with A. A. 
Ledermann of Gtica as mechanic. For the Hower trophy, two 
six-cylinder 36 h. p. runabouts have been entered, tin 1 first to lie 
driven by John S. Williams, of New York, with Andrew J. Het- 
triek, of Philadelphia, as mechanic. Charles Schofield, of 
Detroit, will lie at the wheel of the second runabout, and Frank 
Jungjohann, of Davenport, Iowa, will he in the mechanic's seal. 

* * * 

At a meeting of the Board of Managers of the Association of 
Licensed Automobile Manufacturers held recently the following 
were present: 

American Locomotive Co., James Joyce; Buick Motor Co., W. 
C. Durant; Cadillac Motor Car Co., W. ('. Leland; Corbin 
Motor Vehicle Corps, M. S. Mart; Elmore Mfg. Co., J. II. 
Becker; E-M-F Co.. Wm. B. Meteger; II. II. Franklin Ml'g. Co., 
G. H. Stihvell and II. H. Franklin; Saynes Auto Co., Elwood 
Efaynes; Hewitt Motor Co., E. 1!. Hewitt: Locomobile Co. of 
America, S. T. Davis; Lozier Motor Co., F. C. Chandler; Pack- 
ard Motor Car Co., M. J. Budlong; Peerless Motor Car Co., I.. 
H. Kittredge; Pierce-Arrow Motor Car Co.. Charles Clifton 

Pope Mfg. Co., George Pope and A. I.. Pope; Royal T isl 

Car Co., George J. Dunham; Ah leu Sampson, 3d, ii. E. Mitchell 
Schlen Motor Vehicle Co., EL II. Salmons; F. B. Stearns Co. 
F. B. Stearns: Stevens-Duryea Co., C. C. Hildebrand; E. R 
Thomas Motor Co.. K. I.. Thomas; Waltham Ml'g. Co.. L. J 
Hail : Winton Motor Carriage Co., Thos. Henderson, and E. 1' 

( lhalfant, general manager. 

The business of the meeting was prim ipally of a routine I har- 

acier. Coker F. Clarkson was elected as Assistanl General Man- 
ager id' (he Association to fill out the term of Mr. K. I'. Chalfant, 
who recently resigned as General Manager. 

* * * 

The Stale Legislature of New Jersey recently mad 
priation lor the purchase of a big forty-five horse-power Rambler 
for the use of the executive department oi the S 
On all public occasions in which Governor Franklin For( par- 
ticipates i he Rambler appears driven !>v ihe chauffeur employed 
by the siate. on Governor Fort'- visit to the B. P. 0. F.iks" 
celebration of Flag Day, June itth. at Patterson, X. J., he was 
accompanied in the Rambler by lien. Vivian Lewis, < 
sioner of Banking and [nsuran 

* * » 

The dashing driver who starts with a jump, throws "ii thi 
gear within a short distance, and when stopping di 

lo I he desired point, then slams on the brakes will find that his 
tires will not last so long as I refill friend. 

To put on a high rate of speed suddenly, on a slippery pavement 
or a sandy road, so that the wheels By around while the ear is 
barely moving, is not conducive to long-lived I 

* • • 

\ peculiar precedent has been set by i S 

road laws. Two motors collided at the . I main 

anil a side road. Tile court held that the driver on the main 
road had the right of way, and the drivers on the side roads must 
use precaution in en tin roads. 

* * * 

The San Antonio. Texas. Automobile Cluh'is favoring 
of an ordinan. e t-. require chaufl 
ami physical examination before thej receive driving 



ONCE MORE 

G&JllRES 

WIN 



The continued evidence of their superiority, 
brought out from day to day, must bring home to you 
the fact that they are absolutely the best tires the 
market offers. 

Put our 1909 product on "your car, and tire 
trouble, for you, is past history. 




414-416 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Market 1095. 



BUICK 



"WHITE STREAK" WINS 



Every contest entered in the auto races on the 



EMERYVILLE 



Track July 5th, including taking first and second 
in the Free-for-All, the $1,000 to S1500 class and 
the special match between cars of the Olympic and 
Reliance Clubs. 
Duplicates of these speedy cars can be had for 



$1,150 



f. o. b. San Francisco. Immediate deliveries. 



HOWARD AUTO CO. 

523-533 Golden Gate Avenue 
Telephone Market 15J6 5an FrancUco 



36 



San F 



rancisco 



News Letter 



July 10, 1909 



Representative Garages of San Francisco. 



Washington and East Streets 



Phone Kearny 678 



Ferry Garage Company 

All Workmanship Guaranteed 



Storage Renting 



Supplies Machinist 



MOTOR CAR SERVICE CO. Tftftf ,£■'&?/■• 



J. W. PEARSON, General Manager 
Market and Van Ness 



Phone Market 170S 



Auto Livery Co. 



M. L. Rosenfeld, Mgr. 
Van Ness and Golden Gate. Phone Franklin 1535 



The Renstrom Garage 



424 to 446 Stanyan Street. 



Tel. Park 476 



Golden Gate School of 
Automobile Engineering 



(19-425 Larkin Street 
Phone Franklin 3391 



A. GILCREST 



Automobile 
Clearing House 



San Francisco, Cal 



Thomas B. JefTery & Company, 117-126 Valencia St., San Francisco 



ASK ABOUT 

A J A X TIRE 

INSURANCE 

AJAX-GRIEB RUBBER COMPANY 

N. Easl Corner 57th Street and Broadway, New York. Factories, Trenton, N. J. 
Branches in ail large cities 



CAL. 



AUTO TOP 



CO. 



SEAT COVERS, DUST HOODS, ETC. 
309 GOLDEN GATE AVE. E. H. MORGAN, Mgr. 



Your Wisest Move 

will be to equip your car with a 

Splitdorf Magneto 

the Magneto that gave such perfect ignition all through the 
severest test ever known— the recent 1 0,000 mile Non-Stop- Run 
of the Maxwell car. 

Ask for Magneto catalog. 

C. F. SPLITDORF 

Pacific Coast Branch 
520 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 



OIL IS CHEAPER THAN FRICTION' 




EASTERN 

AUTOMOBILE 



OIL 



EFFICIENT NON-CARBONIZING ECONOMICAL 



Ash your garage. California Compounding Company, Pacific 
Coast Distributors. 




1909 Stoddard Dayton, equipped with Goodyear Detachable 
Tires and Stromberg Carbureter. Owned by Mercantile Fire 
Dispatch Company. This car may be seen speeding to all fires. 

* * * 

Parties North and South-bound at Del Monte. 

June 28. — Mrs. Marcus S. Kosliland, Miss Margaret H. Kosh- 
land, Daniel S. Koshland, Robert S. Koshland, Walter Haas, 
maid and chauffeur, in a Thomas. 

June 29. — Charles St. Goar and S. H. St. Goar in a Buick. 

July 1. — Mrs. S. J. Costello, Mrs. J. P. (Jostello, Master A. 
J. Costello, Miss V. Costello, and Miss Dahl, in a Thomas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward S. Rothehild, Lewis Howard Eothchild, 
maid and chauffeur, in a Locomobile. 

E. M. Hecht, Miss Edith Hecht and chauffeur in a Packard. 

July 2. — Sir. and Mrs. Burke Corbet, Prances Corbet, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. R. Selby, Miss Corbet, Edward B. Corbet and 
Charles Corbet in a Packard. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Bishop, of Los Angeles, Virginia Bishop, 
nurse and chauffeur in a Great Arrow. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roland Bishop, child, nurse and chauffeur in a 
Great Arrow. 

July 3. — Dr. M. R. Gambitz, Miss Birdie L. Gambitz and 
Miss Faith Gambitz in a Chalmers-Detroit. 

Mr. and Mrs. 0. C. HasletJ; and baby, Miss Gisela Haslctt, 
Mrs. Alan Gardner and chauffeur in a Royal Tourist. 

Mrs. Lina Heyman, Mr. and Mrs. J . L. Emanuel, Miss Aileen 
Emanuel and Max Martin in a Locomobile. 

H. M. Landsberger in a Stevens-Duryea. 

Mrs. Alexander Heynemann and maid. 

Lloyd Gibbs Heynemann and Rosalie Heynemann in a six- 
cylinder Peerless. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin J. Dunn and Miss Letitia Leonard in a 
White Steamer. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Morton and chauffeur in a Packard. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Hoag, Roller Hoag, and maid, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. R. Hoag and chauffeur in a Peerless. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Shainwald in a Big Six Stevens-Duryea. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Toby in a Packard. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alper, Mr. and Mrs. H. Nathan and chauffeur 
in a Pierce Arrow. 

E. A. Sharlack, G. J. Sharlach, Mr. and Mrs. J. Adler in a 
While Steamer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Havens in an Oldsmobile. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wickham Havens in a Pierce Arrow. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Patrick and children. 

Mrs. J. C. Patrick in a Locomobile. 

H. C. Wiel and J. W. Chapman in a Buick. 

* * * 

The West gets a lot of the good ones in the automobile busi- 
ness. Perhaps it is the echo of Horace Greeley or the clink of 
the big, round silver simoleons that draws the regulars of the 
trade to the far side of the Rockies, where the people raise 
enough prunes, oranges and canned salmon to raise the price of 
good automobiles, and thereafter raise dust on all highways anent 
the Pacific Ocean. Frank C. Riggs is the latest — Riggs, till 
now assistant sales manager of the Packard Motor Car Company, 
erstwhile vice-president of the Fisk Rubber Company, and one 
of your old friends back in the days of "Yellow Fellows" and 
other bicycles that made life worth living while wc waited for 
motor cars. 



July 10, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



37 



A motor car party, made up of Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Bishop, 
Virginia Bishop, maid and chauffeur, Mr. and Mrs. Roland 
Bishop, child and nurse and chauffeur, all of Los Angeles, re- 
turned in two Great Arrow cars to Del Monte on the 2d. after 
a tour of Napa and Lake Counties, during which they visited 
Witter Springs, Aetna Springs. Laurel Dell and other resorts. 
Mrs. W. T. Bishop is an enthusiastic golfer, and spends much 
id' her time on the links. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. S. Shainwahl, with their son, and Miss 
Saville Shainwald, motored to Del Monte, and spent the holidays 
there. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Havens. Mr. and Mrs. Wiekham Havens, 
of Piedmont, came down to Del Monte in two motor ears for the 

1 ndependence Day holidays. 

* * * 

Gasoline makes the automobile world go around. One hun- 
dred and fifty million gallons are used every year to move the 
motor cars in the Hnited States alone. One hundred and fifty 
million gallons more are consumed in England and the Conti- 
nent for the same purpose. Over 300,000^,000 gallons, or $50,- 
000,000 worth of gasoline, are used in the world each year just 

to make the auto wheels go round. 

* * * 

Bert Dingley, the well-known racing driver, was in town again 
from Modesto last Saturday for more cars. Dingley sold one 
of the large six-cylinder 4'2-inch wheel Olds to Mr. McCullough, 
of Modesto, and drove the machine down last Thursday in record 

breaking time, and is now taking some Chalmers K 30's." 

* * * 

The Modesto and Turloek District has been making good all 
the promises made when irrigation was first introduced there, 
and practically all the farmers in the district are buying auto- 
mobiles. There is no more prosperous section in the State. 



273 Valencia Street, 6an Franclaco. 



FROM 8MA LL BEGINNINGS. 

Great oaks from little aeorns grow and great fires from little 
sparks do blow. 

The time of year is at hand when sportsmen are faring into the 
wilds to build their campfires far from the haunts of man— and 
just as far from the Fire Department. Our Stales which con- 
tain valuable timbered lands have passed vigorou 
posted cautions broadcast to prole:! Eorests against files, but in 
spite "f these precautions millions of dollars' worth of timber 
and property are destroyed annually by fires thai with care am 1 

caution might as well have been avoided. 

Guides realize the great danger of leaving glowing 
in the camp fire when camp is moved. The guide knows the 
danger of throwing down a lighted match after be has lighted his 
pipe. But not all campers have learned to be careful in this re- 
spect which is why each year forest fires aiv reported Prom many 
quarters. 

It doesn't take much of a spark to start a healthy forest tire 

during a dry Beason in the woods when the leaves are like 

and the moss crackles underfoot. \t a time like that the Face 

of Nature seems to he merely waiting for the torch ami a forest 

lire will sfart on the slightest provocation. 

Make up your mind now. Brother Spor -lean, thai when you 
go inlo the woods this season no fire shall slart from any care- ~~ " ~ ~ 

lessness on your part. Before you break camp, see thai the camp V lllCQIliZlIli? 
lire is stamped out, or better still, doused with water. Winn you 

light your pipe gpil on the match before von throw it away, and 
when you hear of a forest fire that has blasted hundreds of acres 

in spite of the efforts of every man for miles around who helped 
fight it nighl and day, you will be thankful that it was not started 
by your hand. 



Tips to Automobilists 

SAN FRANCISCO— Osen & Hunter Auto Co., 511 Golden Gate avenue. 
Tel Market 2723. The San Francisco home of the "Mitchell Family." 

SAN FRANCISCO— Reed Electric Laboratories, 370 Golden Gate avenue. 
Tel. Franklin 4534. Electric repairing and sundries. Reed's electric 
lights for automobiles. Batteries repaired and recharged. 

14-MILE HOUSE — "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Automobile Supplies and re- 
pair shop. First class accommodations. Cuisine unsurpassed on the 
Coast. "Andy," formerly of the "Cliff. House." 

OAKLAND— Osen & Hunter Auto Co., 1224 "Webster street. Tel. Oah 
4076. The Oakland home of the "Mitchell Family." 

MAYFIELD — Reed Electric Works, on the road. Telephone Palo Alto 
693 R-I. Electric repairing and sundries. Batteries recharged. Gasoline 
and oils. Reed's electric lights for autos. 

SAN JOSE — Holsberg Bros., 246 "W. Santa Clara (opposite Notre Dame 
Convent), upon entering town via S. F. road. Gasoline, oils, sundries and 
repairs. Seven passenger Thomas for hire. 

SAN JOSE — Osen & Hunter Auto Co., 1st and St. James Sts. Tel. 
Main 38. The gan Jose home of the "Mitchell Family." 

SAN JOSE— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE, Market and St. James 
streets. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler and Regal agencies. 

SAN JOSE — San Jose Garage, 400 North First street, Blomdahl & 
Keller, Mgrs. Renting, repairing and sundries. Agents for Goodyear 
tires. Phone Main 121. W. F. Hunt, agent for Chalmers-Detroit, 
Thomas, Bulck and Olds. Phone Main 493. 

SAN JOSE. — Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlor for ladies In connec- 
tion. "MlBsion Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner In California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

GILROT, CAL. — George E. Tlce, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service, 260 N. Mon- 
terey street. 

WATSONVILLE. — J. H. Covell Garage. Expert machine work, auto 
supplies, batteries recharged, gas engines repaired. Autos for hire day or 
night. Corner Main street and Lick avenue. 

SANTA CRUZ. — Pacific Garage, Hunt & Grislngher. proprietors. Auto 
repairing and supplies. Cars for hire. Phone Main 222. 353-355 Pacific 
avenue, Santa Cruz. 

SAN JUAN. — Plaza Hotel — Headquarters for automobiles and tourists 
(special attention.) Opposite the old San Juan Bautista Mission, founded 
1797. Main road to Hotel Del Monte. Tony Falx, Jr.. Prop. 

SANTA ROSA. — Occidental Hotel. Bane Bros., props. 4th and B Sts. 
European plan, $1.00 per day and up. American plan $2.60 per day and 
up. The most up-to-date hotel north of San Francisco. Cuisine unsur- 
passed. Two garages In connection. 

HEALDSBURG. CAL.— The Union Hotel. Wade H. Etter. Opposite 
the plaza. Special attention to auto parties. First class accommodations. 
Commodious garage. 



Keenan Bros. 



Automobile E.igineera, Machinists and Blacksmiths. 



Telephone Market 1986 



IGNITION 

TROUBLES 

AVOIDED 



and at less expense and inconven- 
ience to you than at present. Rent 
your batteries from Auto Ignition Co. 
709-711 Octavla St, Phone Market 5678. 



MARTLAND, PEART & ELKINGTON 



Phone Market 6370. 



42 Van Ness Avenue. 



San Francisco, Cat. 



Tbe sailors of tbe moDitor Cheyenne haw evidently a 

better appreciation of tbe fitness of things than Mrs. Hand 
Evans. That lady, lately divorced from Lieutenant Evans on 
accounl of a kissing episode with Lieutenan Osburn, had the 
temerity during a theatrical engagement at Vallejo. to sincr. "I 
Wonder Who is Kissing Her Non '" A sustained hissing from 

lor portion of the audieni e badly flustered th 
which was greatli edit of the aforementioned sail 

is hilly time that some rebukes were administered to the horde 
of women who afflict the public in the cheaper theatres. 



A Domestic Eye Remedy, 
Compounded hv Experienced Physicians. Conforms to Pure Food and 
Drugs Laws. Wins Friends Wherever Used. Ask Druggists for Murine 
Eye Remedy. Try Murine In Tour Eyes. Tou Will Like Murine. 



THE GUARANTEED VULCANIZING CO. 

84 SEVENTH STREET, opposite PoM-oHice. SAN FRANCISCO 

Vulcanizing Patches on Inner Tubes, 25 cents. Work called for 
and delivered. Every repair guaranteed. 



1910 MODELS HAVE ARRIVED 

S. G. RAYL 

Northern California Representative 

583-591 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco. 




38 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1000 



aty? iJItntefrr ttf ifamgn Affairs 



[ndia Wants 
Independence. 



England had about recovered from 
the "German invasion" scare, when 
news from British [ndia Dot • > i i i > 
revived the "scare" but injected a 
fresh spasm into the public mind. Ami there is occasion enough 
for official as well as unofficial Great Britain to be anxious about 
the Empire's hold upon that far-away possession. Either the 
London Government has been too generous or In., harsh with 
India in the centuries since the English East India Company 
secured a foothold there in 1600. for it is evident thai the spirit 
of separation from British sovereignty is spreading throughput 
all the borders ..I' tin- land. And now the King ..I' England and 
Emperor ..I' India is facing a nn.-! intricate problem — a problem 
whose solution will have to be sought in the subjugation or in the 
granting of a very much wider scope of personal liberty and self- 
government to the people. The leading spirits of the governed 
class are telling their countrymen that [ndia new stands to 
Great Britain very much as the American colonies .lid jusl be- 
fore the revolution, and that India i- as much justified in de- 
claring its independence as the American colonies were in 1776. 
lint, unfortunately for India, instead of a Bunker Ifill as a 
protest and a warning, the leaders seem to think the better way 
to declare their hostility to British rule is to inaugurate a system 
of assassination of their English rulers. They do not scan to 
understand that the world looks upon such warfare with horror, 
and that the more they resort to such methods to tail the chains 
that bind them to their Anglo-Saxon Emperor the stronger will 
the chains be made, for until they assert their manhood and go 
about winning national independence, the sympathy of the civil- 
ised world and its moral support will be against them. T.'i ■ I'a. i 
remains, however, (bar not sine the Sepoy rebellion in 1857 has 
the situation in India- pressed harder against British authority 
than new. and it would seem that i revolution to be most fiercely 
conducted by the natives of India for independence is imminent 
in the near future. Nevertheless, it will fail, because of the 
fiendishness of the spirit of the leader- of the movement. In- 
dependence that is won by patriotism gets the glad band, bill 
separateness that is won by assassination and other forms of 
treachery i.- a plunge into deeper degradation. 



The move nt of Russian troops 

Russia Invades Persia, upon Persian -oil has taning 

other than (be subjugation of the 
northern ball' of the Shah's kingdom. Nearly a year ago. the 
News Letter pointed out how Russia was preparing to lake ad- 
vantage ..I' the Shah's inability, or refusal, to rest. .re peace ami 

lb., operation of law between the warring factions in bis count 

try, and invade the nation, ostensible to establish order, but in 
reality to start the beginning of whatwonhl end in perina 
occupation with Russian civil and military rule the only author- 
itv. The predictions of the News Letter are now such facts as 
the historian will use when be c IS to tell about lb' last be- 

ginning of the last fall of the once mighty empire of Cyrus, 
Persia or ancient Iran, supposed to l.e tic firs! home of the 
Aryan race. What backing the Czar i- getting from the Ibr- 
manic side of the Russia-Germany-Austria tripartite i. n ,,| 
known, but it is surmised thai be enters Persia without pretest. 

and that it is part of a great and far-reaching sehei .1' the 

tripartite alliance, which involves the Near as well as the Far 
East, and in the consummation ol which Germany's Asia Minor 
railway system is to have a conspicuous place. Il is known al- 
ready that Russian invasion of Persia is distasteful to Turkey, 
and that this is more than likely to involve England, because 
every move Iiussia or the Germanic combine makes in Pei 
in Asia Minor is in the direction of India, and not only so, but 
threatens the stability of the Ottoman Empire; besides, there 
- ' isted a compact for a long lime between Russia and Ens| 
land that when the Persian plum was ready to fall. Great Brill 
ait) would take the Southern half and Russia the northern half, 
but it now transpires that the Czar want- the whole plum. Thus 
appears another war cloud in Europe's political sky, and thus 
are the bonds between Turkey. Prance ami England made 
stronger. 



The invitation of the Sultan of Tu - 

Of General Interest. key to the Zion movement t.. give up 
the Palestine idea and accept Meso- 
potamia for a home for the Russian .Tews, and of other countries 
as well, is being favorably considered by the managers id' the 
movement, and the indications -are that the oiler will be ac- 
cepted. The guarantee is free thought, free press and a condi- 
tion for religious belief that shall forever be held sacred by the 
empire, and above all. in a way, immunity from compulsory 
military service. The area of Mesopotamia is a little over 100,- 

square mile- or about two-thirds the area of California, but 

like California, much of the land will have to be irrigated. That, 
however, will be no drawback, as the dews of Paris, Berlin ami 

London have already signified their willingness to construe! 

works for ample water supplies if otherwise the conditions are 
favorable. The belief now is that the problem of surrounding 
the Russian dews more particularly with desirable means of 
home-making will lie solved by accepting Turkey's offer. It is 
certain the leading ,h-\\- in Turkey are urging their Russian 
brethren to lose no lime in investigating the Sultan's offer. — 
Admiral Lord Beresford continues to amuse his countrymen to 
a full appreciation of Germany's menace by demanding an 
imperial navy, and threatens to expose the weakness of Britain's 
sea power miles- th e Admiralty moves pretty lively in the work 
of more and greater preparedness for war. — The French navy 
department is all torn up over discoveries of graft ami other 
kinds of crookedness in the Construction of war craft. — Former 

Sultan Abdul Ilamid lias turned over to the Government the 

$15,000,000 which be had concealed. He was told if he did not 

be would be charged with holding it to finance a revolution for 
iii- restoration to the throne, and the charge might end in his 

own death at the bands of a suspicious public. — Word comes 

from Berlin that because tic c meree of Germany and England 

is being threatc 1 by tic United states, the Kaiser would like 

lo have Ibc British-German hat. -bet buried and the two nation- 
unite in an industrial and commercial war against America, the 
lirst move to be a revised Monroe Doctrine SO worded that the 

United States would be shut out of further territorial possessions 
iii Europe ami Asia. — The desert Mohammedans of Morocco are 

Up in arms against the Sultan, and propose to overthrow the 
(....eminent because be refuses to maintain a hostile attitude 
against Christian nations. — The "revised" American tariff has 
aroused all Europe, and talk of retaliation is beard in all indus- 
trial centers. — Kresh plots have been unearthed in Russia to 
assassinate the Czar and a long list of nobles. — Fortunately for 
the pca.e of Europe, Austrian court circles are growing suspi- 
cious • .!' Germany, and the Hungarians are fanning the lire- of 
distrust. 



Surprise Sudion Sweeper {&b 

Patented Feb. 4. 1908 

Price $12.50. Operated by hand. Larue sale Eafl. No exertion. No 
fatigue. Can be operated by a child. Is portable. Weighs only 5 lbs. 
Docs the work of Electric Sweeper at no cofl for operation. By express 
prepaid. Jusl introduced West. Agents wanted in Washington. Oregon. 
California. Montana. Idaho. Utah, Nevada. Arizona, New Mexico. Colo- 
rado, Wyoming. Send for Advertising Matter. 

Pacific Utilities Company 

Monadnock Building, San Francisco 

Controlling Exclusive Rights for Above Mentioned 

Stales and Territories. 



Branch Office, 542 So. Spring 
Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



<$ȣ 




Murphy Grant & Company 

Wholesale Dry Goods 
N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets. San Francisco. 

New Goods constantly arriving and on sale. 



July 10, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



39 



A BIO ONE. 

I won M imt be a hunter — No! — 

Ami shiv the elephants 
For feai that through my life IM go 

Pursued by frightful ha'nts. 

Of all the awful ghosts and things 

By which one is accursed 
I'm sure (hat though it has no wings 

The elephantom's worst ! 

—Wilbur D. Nesbit. 



Promptness is a characteristic of the Spaulding Carpet 

Cleaning Company. Thoroughness is another, and the housewife 
who entrusts her rugs or carpets to this firm is a walking adver- 
tisement of its efficiency. Every quality that goes to ensure an 
ever-increasing patronage is the practice of this reliable house. 



WEDDING PRESENTS. 
The choicest variety to select from at Marsh's, corner Cali- 
fornia and Polk streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



The July Overland Monthly contains an exhaustive arti- 
cle describing the charms of the Hawaiian Islands. At all 
news-stands. 




THE FORUM CAFE 



K 



N D 



Now under the management of 

MR. GUSTAV MANN 



Castle Crags Farm 

Shasta County, California 

A LOG CABIN COLONY. At the foot of the Crags and 
adjacent to Mount Shasta. Wholesome home cook- 
ing, hot and cold water, shower baths in every cabin. 
New assembly hall. Fine fishing and hunting. Under 
the management of Mrs. W. F. Morris, formerly of 
Hotel Cecil, San Francisco. 

For rates and reservations address Mrs. Morris at Hotel Victoria. 
San Francisco. 



Santa Cruz 



Welcomes automobilists and excursionists and those 
seeking recreation for their summer vacations. Band 
concerts, dancing, bathing and boating every afternoon 
and evening. 

Grand Opening of the Casino Saturday night June fifth. 



Campers to Yosemite Valley 

can be supplied with tents, complete camping outfits and all kinds 
of provisions at the Yosemite Valley Store. Parties outfitted for 
High Sierra trips. Rates reasonable. Nelson U Salter. Proprietor. 



June Fishing Always Best. 
Remarkably Warm June Weather. 



Tallac 

and 

Brockway 



The resorts that have made Lake Tahoe famous for its fishing 
and scenery. 

Brockway at the northern end of the Lake always famous for its 
fishing, and having the only hot springs, which are a wonder in 
themselves and the curative properties of the waters. 

Tallac, at the southern end of the Lake, is noted for its natural 
advantages and location. 

Surrounded by innumerable small lakes and streams stocked 
with several varieties of trout make it the delight of the rod fisher- 
men. All within easy walking, riding or driving distance. 

Hotel and cottages steam heated and electric lights; boats, 
launches and livery under hotel management. Our specialty — 
Finest of milk, cream and butter. 

Information Peck-Judah Company, 789 Market, Southern Pacific 
Information Bureau, Lawrence & Comstock, Tallac and Brock- 
way. 




HIGH 



130 MILES 
PERFECT R0A ?5 



AROUND 



LAND SP 



RINGS 



Auto Stage from Pieta 75 minutes. 

150 Rooms. Electric lights. 30 mineral springs. Wonderfully 

curative. 

Unsurpassed cuisine. Complete garage and automobile supplies. 

NEW MANAGEMENT. For, reservations an J further particulars address 

P. F. KOHNKE. Lessee and Manager 

C.E.ZINKAND. Au&ant Manager 
or Peck Judah Information Bureau. 789 Market Street. San Francisco 




AMERICA'S GREATEST 

HEALTH AND 

PLEASURE RESORT. 



Positive cure for rheumatism and stomach trouble. Table first- 
class. The roads have been put In excellent shape for staging and 
autos. Rates, $12 to $H per week. Baths free to guests. For fur- 
ther particulars address R. H. CL'RRY. Proprietor. The Geysers. 
California. 

Not ire — All guests remaining two weeks and under four will 
be refunded their fare one way. and guests remaining four weeks 
and longer will be refunded round trip fare from San Francisco. 



Mark West Warm Springs 

SONOMA COUNTY 

Only 3 1-2 hours from San Francisco and but 7 miles' staging 
Meet trains of N. W. Pacific at Fulton both morning and evening. 
Round trip only $3.75. Now owned and conducted by J. F. Mul- 
grew. for the past 13 years at Skaggs Springs, who refers, with 
confidence, to any one of his guests of the past. Nine mineral 
springs; superb boating and swimming; famous wild grape vine 
arbors — one 50 by 170 feet, covering hotel veranda and driveway. 
"The prettiest place In California" is the verdict of thousands 
Can now accommodate 200. Fine table. My own dairy and garden 
All amusements. Fine trout streams. Rates. $2 a day. or $12 a 
week Address, J. F. MULGREW. Fulton, Cal. 



40 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 10, 1909 



STATEMENT OF THE CONDITION AND VALUE OF THE ASSETS 

AND LIABILITIES OF 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

(A CORPORATION) 

(MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO) 

DATED JUNE 30, 1909 



ASSETS 

1— Bonds of the United States ($7,935,- 
000.00), of the District of Columbia, guar- 
anteed by the United States Government 
($475,000.00)', of the Stale of California 
($850,000.00). of the City and County of 
San Francisco' ($1,237,700.00), and County 
and Municipal Bonds of the Stale of Cali- 
fornia ($403,000.00). the actual value of 
which is $12,133,098.15 

3— Cash in United Stales Gold and Sil- 
ver Coin and Check? 2,551,448.43 

3 — Miscellaneous Bonds, the actual value 
of which is 6,401,007.4 1 

They are "San Francisco and North 
Pacific Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds" 
($469,000.00), "San Francisco and San 
Joaquin Vallev Railway Company 5 per 
cent Bonds"' ($108,000.00), "Southern 
Pacific Branch Railway Company of Califor- 
nia 6 per cent Bonds" ($366,000.00), 
"Northern California Railway Company 5 
per cent Bonds" ($83,000.00), "Northern 
Railway Company of California 5 per cenl 
Bonds"' ($39,000.00), "Los Angeles Pacific 
Railroad Company of California Refund- 
ing 5 per cent Bonds" ($100,000.00), Los 
Angeles Railway Company of California 5 
per cent Bonds" ($334,000.00), Market-St. 
Cable Co. 6 per cent Bonds" ($858,000.00), 
"Market Street. Railway Company First 
Consolidated Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds" 
($753,000.00), "Powell Street Railway 
Company 6 per cent Bonds" ($185,000.00), 
"The Omnibus Cable Company 6 per cent 
Bonds" ($167,000.00), "Sutter Street Rail- 
way Company 5 per cent Bonds"- ($150,- 
000.00). "Ferries and Cliff House Railway 
Company (i per cent Bonds'-' ( *r,.0un.no ) . 
"The Merchants' Exchange 7 per cent 
Bonds" ($1,500,000.00), "San Francisco 
Gas & Electric Company IV> per cent 
Bonds" ($484,000.00.) 

4 — Promissory Notes and the debts there- 
>v secured, the actual value of which is. . . . 32,341,072.31 

The condition of said Promissory Notes 
and debts is as follows: They arc all exist- 
ing contracts, owned by said Corporation, 
and are payable to it at its office, which is 
situated at the corner of Market. McAllister 
and Jones St?., in the city and county of 
San Francisco. State of California, and the 
payment thereof is secured by First Mort- 
gages on Real Estate within this State. Said 
Promissory Notes are kept and held by said 
Corporation at its said office, which is its 
principal place of business, and said Notes 
and debts are there situated. 
5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby 
secured, the actual value of which is 48,298.67 



The condition of the said Promisson 
Notes and debts is as follows: They are all 
existing contracts, owned by said Corpora- 
tion, and are payable to it at its office, which 
is situated as aforesaid, and the payment 
thereof is secured by pledge and hypotheca- 
tion of Bonds of Railroad and Quasi-Pub- 
lic Corporations and other securities. 

(i — (a) Real Estate situated in the City 
and County of San Francisco ($166,973.18), 
and in the counties of Santa Clara ($26,- 
141.65), Alameda ($255.53), and San Ma- 
teo ($3,351.57), in this State, the actual 
value of which is 

(b) The land and building in which said 
Corporation keeps its said office, the actual 
value of which is 

The condition of said Real Estate is that 
it belongs to said corporation, and part of 
it is productive. 

7 — Contingent Fund — Interest due and 
uncollected on promissory notes $138, 767.97 

Interest accrued but not yet 
payable on United States and 
othi !■ Bonds 116,965.60 



195,621.93 



999,141.37 



855,733.51 



Total Assets $54,925,421.87 



LIABILITIES 



1 — Said Corporation owes Deposits 
amounting to and the actual value of which 
is $51,233,764.48 

.' — Accrued Interest — Interest 
due and uncollected on Promis- 
sorj Notes $138,767.97 

Interesl accrued but not yet 

payable on United State- and 

other Bonds 116,965.60 255,733.57 

4 — Reserve Fund, Actual Value 3,445,923.83 



Total Liabilities $54.935. (81. 87 



Till-: HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

By JAMES R. KELLY, President. 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

By R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 



Slate of California. City and County of San Francisco, ss. 
JAMES R. KELLY and R. M. TOBIN, beins each duly 
sworn, each for himself, says: That JAMES R. KELLY 
is Presideni and that said R. M. TOBIN is Secretary of 
! Mi: HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
the Corporation above mentioned, and that the foregoing 
statement is true. 

JAMES R. KELLY, President. 
R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 3d day of July, 
1909. 

CHARLES T. STANLEY, 
Notary Public in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco, State, of California. 




g&w 'M5* 1 *** 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. LXXVI1I 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 17, 1909 



No. 3 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott. 773 Market St, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway. C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



Tom Taggart is out of another scrape. He proved that 

lie never knew or saw the lady in the ease. 

Oh, yes, Ruef and Sehmitz are still with us, but the for- 
mer is spending his time in retirement. 

Man-eating lions are reported to be on Roosevelt's trail. 

But our Nimrod went away loaded for just such game. 

The public will soon know who is running this nation — 

President Taft or Senator Aldrich. At present writing, it looks 
like Aldrich. 

Berkeley has inaugurated an extensive system of street 

cleaning. Will not the reform reach beyond the streets and 
tackle the "blind pigs?" 

In the language of the streel gamin, "yon bet your life" 

all the building enterprise is not in the business districts. Ride 
nut to the ocean and see. 

King Solomon called (hem concubines, but "affinity" 

means the same tiling: besides, it sounds more poetical and 
costs no more in cash or morals. 

"Co-respondent" is becoming a household word in this 

country, but budding ambition in be one might he discouraged 
without materially Injuring the nation's Bocial life. 

China wants $27,000,000 of foreign cash for railway 

construction, and American capital proposes to make it hot tor 

the Celestials if it is not invited to the melon cutting. 

Our Filipino brethren will please lake notice that the 

Senate has no notion of granting them independence. Tin' 
islands have noi ye1 been sufficiently exploited. See! 

The whole nation will rejoice when it hears ol' Mr-. Tail's 

great improvement in health; besides, Bhe is blameless ol all re- 
sponsibility for thai Payne-Aldrieh tariff monstrosity. 

Again Speaker Cannon gets even with Ca ir noi 

standing by him in the Chicago Convention. California Con- 
gressmen are noi wanted on the tariff conference committee. 

The Epworth League proposes t" go straight after 

l';i. Hi, Coasl sinners. Good idea, bul pass by on the other side 
of San Francisco. There are not enough here to bother about. 

Prince Von Buelow, the German chancellor, resig 

cause a new "grouping" in the Reichstag hurt his feelings. 

Only a "grouping" of electors at the 1 ballol box ever mo - 

an to step down and out. 
Elgin, Ills., has appointed a committee of staid and dig- 
nified married women to look after the young misses ,,f the town 
during the militia encampment Rather tough, this, on the war- 
riors .if 'lii, !,• .lor'" Cannon's State. 

Our own plain-folk Ambassador Reid to the court of St. 

.lames has been entertaining the king, queen and the whole 
royal family at his country residence. Hut his majesty will find 
wasting precious time if he thinks to turn the head of any 
American man or woman by a parade of royal robes. Reid and 
plain and democratic to notice such trap- 
pings. 



Will psychologists please let up on the Brasch murder 

case ? 

Between mowing hay and abusing "Republican princi- 
ples," Bryan is a very busy man these days. But he is a back 
number and harmless. 

No, Senator Aldrich is not the President of the United 

States. At least, William H. Taft continues to draw down 
the salary. 

There probably never was a Congressional enactment so 

universally condemned as the Payne-Aldrieh tariff bill. But 
what do the "bosses" care about that? 

The Republican party has already rendered ils verdict in 

the Payne-Aldrich tariff case. About one-half of the present 
number of the Congress are found guilty of treason lo the party 
and to the country. 

San Francisco's great business palaces — all new — arc the 

wonder of all visitors. All right, hut watch the immense vulume 
of daily business transactions in them if you want something to 
open your eyes von wide. 

What does it mean, anyway? British naval officers have 

the Turkish squadron of warships out to sea testing their fitness 
to do business with shot and shell. Always your John Bull keeps 
his right eye wide open. 

Lest they forget, let rogues of all degrees 'if crime re- 
member thai Ilenev's immunity bath-house is still at the old 
stand, though the water in the tub is ;i little discolored from com- 
ing in contact with that Board of Supervisors. 

That Oakland husband who obliges his wife to utilize 

his grandmother's cast-off dresses ami the like is a genuine 
economist. Ii is jusl such hnsiness talent that become 
and finally brings up in the United Smies Senate. 

The illustrious Hi my is hunting big game in Alaska. Of 

course, he will give snakes and polecats I lie immunity bath if 
they will locate the hiding place ,,! ij lions, thai his 

blunderbnss may have a chance to -li off its mouth at them. 

Bryan's "Commoner" is very busy these .lavs showing up 

he treacherj of certain Democrats in supporting Aldrich's up- 
ward revision of thi tariff schedules. Keep up the poun 
Mr. Perpetual Candidate for the glory and good things of office. 

The persecution mill of the District Attorney's office has 

resumed work on Patrick Calhoun, and the grinding will con- 
tinue until alter the election. Henry hopes that the rattle of 

the machinery will make g I campaign thunder for his c li- 

dacv. 

Had Bigamist Madson not been run to earth, no doubt 

n would have organized i love-making trust with himself 
;is cashier and obtainer "f raw material for use in the factory. 
But who would have thought the woods were so full o 

women ? 

The farmers, mechanics and other classes of labor will re- 
joice to know that the Aldrich tariff reduces the duty on uncut 
diamonds to five per cent ad valorem. It « ■( the 
3 nator to be mindful of the interests of working people 
while dressing up a new tariff schedule. Oh. how fervently our 
Congressional millionaires do love us ]H)or folk! 

The indications are. that there will be an unusually large 

crop of office-seekers at the municipal election, hut that should 
not be taken to mean an outburst of patriotism or that a 
supply of civic righteousness has struck the town. The same 
old itching palm will be found sticking out behind, and th 
tat pocket will be found hanging behind the door. 



Bigamist Christian C. Johnson, 
The Madsons of Society, alias John Madson. is the product 

of the ethical code of modern society. 
So are his twenty-nine wives and sweethearts and affinities. "Is 
he rich and handsome ?" "Does she possess a fortune in her own 
right?" — that seems to be the sum total of the social catechism 
these days. The time was, as to the man particularly, when the 
catechism propounded very different questions, such as "What 
are his family antecedents?" "What is his personal history — 
what is and what has been his general conduct of life?" "What 
is her lineage?" In the good old days, when men and women 
were measured by a high standard of moral worth and intel- 
lectual accomplishments, the word "cash" had no place in con- 
versation nor in estimating personal worthiness. 

Where will room be found for common decency in aspiration 
and mental purity in minds that run to such baseness? Mad- 
son's theory of social life is essentially one that would urge upon 
the youth of the country the cultivation of the horrible and atro- 
cious doctrine of "free love," of "soul mates," and of "affinities," 
but upon that level of mental culture which ultimately reaches 
down to degradation and self-contempt. No doubt the news- 
papers make too much of such affairs. No doubt it would be 
better if they would print the mere facts, leaving out all embell- 
ishment and sensational features, and conclude the history by 
announcing the sentence of the court. But. on the other hand, 
experience has taught publishers that suppression of sensational 
happenings is sure death to the publication. And is not the 
publisher justified in supplying the wants of his patrons? They 
set the pace for him. So at its final analysis, society will be 
found to blame for making it possible for the Madsons to live and 
nourish, and still further to blame for feeding upon the details 
of the vile stuff with a gluttonous appetite. Oh, no. the Madsons 
are not wholly to blame. There are others. 



and such other conveniences are being or have been installed as 
are required by a community of home owners. Any one who has 
not kept abreast of the times since the fire would be fully com- 
pensated by a ride through that portion of the city that has been 
given over to homes and small merchants. The growth of these 
districts in the last three years has kept fully abreast of the 
gigantic and heroic growth of the centers of finance, industry 
and commerce. 



What San Franciscans need, and 
Growth of need very much, is more personal 

Residence Disteicts. knowledge of the rapid spread of 

building operations in what are 
properly called the residence districts. So proud of the new 
down-town districts, with their commercial and industrial pal- 
aces, which have come up out of the ashes of the great lire. as if 
by magic, is the average business man that he loses sight of an- 
other great fact, which is that the districts that lie beyond the 
centers of trade and traffic are keeping pace with "down town" 
in growth and importance. If the residence districts are not 
erecting buildings whose roofs are almost cloud-swept, they are 
far from being at a stand-still. It is in fact marvelous how all 
the outlying sections of the city are investing money in new 
homes when so much capital is needed to rebuild the waste places 
in business centers. But the spirit of energy, thrift and growth 
is just as pronounced outside as in the confines of the great 
commercial streets. 

It is urged by a few timid souls that San Francisco is several 
years ahead of the demand in mammoth structures for mercantile 
and office accommodations. That is not true, nor is ii 
true that the residence districts are running wild in building 
residences and cross-street stores. While a stranger migh 
amazed to see so much activity in the building trades beyond the 
confines of the great retail and wholesale localities, a citizen of 
the city should know that Greater San Francisco includes a m 
velous reaching out for investments of comparatively small sum-. 
and he would be still more amazed when told that a very lars 
percentage of these new dwellings are owned by their occupants. 
But erecting new dwellings, apartment houses and stores is nol 
all that is being done. Everywhere the streets are bein° pa 



The News Letter has never advo- 
The Geaey-St. Road. cated municipal ownership and oper- 
ation of public utilities, and the his- 
tory of San Francisco gives plenty of evidence that the people 
generally are anything but favorable to schemes that provide for 
such ventures and enterprises in the name of the official com- 
munity. But the Geary street road presents a very different 
proposition, or, rather, a solution of one phase of municipal 
ownership which makes the operation of that line under public 
ownership quite feasible and practical. In the first place, the 
Geary street road comes under city ownership by inheritance, 
and hence it does not stand as a municipal investment and origi- 
nal construction. But it does represent a large cash value to sell, 
lease or to operate under public direction, and the question is. 
how can the property best be made to serve the public and at the 
same time yield a reasonable net sum of money annually to the 
municipality. 

The electors have already condemned the scheme to rebuild 
the load at a cost of nearly $2,000,000. and the obj iction to hay- 
ing the property absorbed by the United Railroads is equally as 
positive, but the fact still remains that the road is owned by 
the city, and the problem of what to do with it i- still unsolved. 
In view of all this, the city is fated to own and operate the line, 
or cause it to be operated under some sort of a lease to private 
capital. It has been suggested, and the suggestion appears feas- 
ible, that the city change the cable power to the overhead trolly 
system, which would not cost over $100,00(1. provided the origi- 
nal road-bed, which is said to be the best in the city, were re- 
tained. It is suggested, too. that the Point Lobos avenue sec- 
tion be continued to the beach, which is not a bad idea, and after 
the |>ro|ieriy i- in good order, lease it for a term of years on the 
basis of its gross receipts — not net receipts, for under such a 
contract there never would be a net income. Another reason that 
has been put forward for retaining the road under municipal 
ownership is, that it could always be held as a club over design- 
ing persons and corporations who may try to control the street 
ear system. And if sold outright to an independent com- 
pany, it would be made the nucleus for a competing system which 
would lie attended by all sorts of official corruption in efforts to 
secure franchises on streets already occupied by tracks. On the 
whole, therefore, if the Geary street line be a white elephant, 
would it not be advisable to retain it for prudential reasons. 
provided it could lie made fully self -sustaining ? 

As is well-known, the Geary street road is. in the Brsi place, 
one of the very best roadways in the city, and in the second place, 
from Powell street to its Golden Gate Park terminus the line 
lies altogether upon residence streets, where the trolly system 
would meet with little opposition and where transfers to con- 
tinuous or cross lines would not be very essential. Anyway, the 

I pie will never agree to spending millions of public monej to 

carry out fantastic plans of certain city officials, nor do the peo- 
ple wish to have the property pass from municipal ownership. 
For these reasons, therefore, ii would seem thai the most feasible 
and practical use the road could be put to is the adoption of Bome 
such plan for its rehabilitation and operation as herein 
outlined. 



July 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



It has been shown that the eommis- 
C'ommission Brigand. sion merchant, instead of bein 

benefit to producer and consumer, 
is a pirate who feeds on both ends, and that everything that 
comes to his mill is grist. Thus we have this modem Claude 
Duval levying tribute at the gates of the city, and we find that 
he has improved on the methods of the olden time. lie flies the 
pirate flag; boldly, and without fear of the law or the objection 
of the individual, he levies his toll and collects. Farther than 
this: he prevents the competition by a Free Market or by the 
joint action of the producer. 

The remedy, then, is in the hands of the State, and the State 
must provide the adequate means, unhindered by Harbor Com- 
missioners or others, by which the farmer may exhibit his pro- 
duce and compete with the freebooter who now has him and the 
consumer by the throat. It is true that a market might be estab- 
lished by the farmers themselves, and that this establishment 
would cost but little, but there is no initiative among the agricul- 
turists. They may be depended upon to air their grievances, 
and they are often heard in loud acclaim against the predatory 
system of the commission merchant, but to expect them to take 
effective steps to put a stop to the practices of the craft is to 
expect too much. It is true, too, that this evil is one that is not 
of the making by the agriculturist, but one that has grown be- 
cause of the avoidance of responsibility by the consumer — the 
general public. 

It is found that the public, ton, howl loudly about the fact 
that right in the midst of the most prolific fruit land in the 
world it is impossible to buy good fruit at anything like a reason- 
able price. And yet the same howling public will not lend its 
ear to the plan to prevent a continuance of the evil practices by 
which they daily pay a protective tariff into the hands of the com- 
mission houses who impoverish the producer and mulct the con- 
sumer. 

Plainly, then, it is the duly of the two great factors in this 
matter to eliminate the produce and fruit commission merchant 
and establish a normal and regular supply of fruit, to educate 
the people to fruit eating, to introduce the people of the bay 
cities to the fruit some of them have never seen, and to increase 
thereby the sale thereof. In order to do this, the free market 
should be re-established, but it should be in the hands of its 
friends and not its enemies. ft should be managed by a board of 
farmers, and not by politicians. The public weigher system 
should be abolished altogether, or it should be in the hands "I 
State officials and subject to constant supervision and inspection, 
and the damaged good3 claims of the commission merchant 
should be vised and approved or disapproved by a regularly ap- 
pointed market inspector. In this case we would find that 
chickens do not die of heart failure, and thai peaches do not rol 
between San Francisco and Woodland, or other nearb} points, 
while watermelons might, as a result of a law prohibiting the de- 
struction of food stuffs, be had as Low as fifteen cents in tb 
son, and not one go to feed the bay tishes in as insane attempt to 
boost prices; to the detriment of consumer ami producer. 



Let Us Rj 

Together. 



Let us reason together. Has not 
the "higher up" judicial farce been 
on the municipal hoards long 
enough ? Has no( the play i 

the level of brutal rivalry to excel in oratorical vindicti 

;iiul rhetorical billingsgate? Baa an] 

ether than bedaubing the fair Dame of San I i? lias not 

the ermine of (he bench and respect tor law at the bar wallowed 
3Uffi( iently in the tilth of fl actors? All 

lie world is kept advised of the operation o( the -raft smut mill. 
and of the tilth and smells of the immunity bath-tub. And what 
has been accomplished other than the creation of an oppor 
for one man to po 1 'roseeutor. 

what is Irs record as a lawyer and a gentleman ■ As to his i 
as a gentleman, we will let that pass. Tits record for kno. 
of the criminal law and for ability to conduct prosecutioi 
riolations ol il is besmeared with disgraceful failure. The 
of vituperation, the cuts of satire and the ground 

and lofty vindication have been palmed ofl ce of know- 

if the law and of success as a prosecutor. His self-it 
candidacy for th< torney is the only • 

accruing from Mr. Haley's identification with tl - 
"graft cases.'" Then let us come and reason together. It 
the all iitioti plastered the garments of fair San Fran- 



cisco sufficiently with the slime of persecution? Come, now, 
and let us talk it over. Who has been convicted of , rime a 
the years of prosecution? What is the sum total of vindications 
of outraged law? The answer is easy — a dozen or more arch 
criminals running at large with immunity contracts In their 

pockets and with "pardon" blazed on their case-harde I faces. 

And for accomplishing so much for confessed crime, Mr. Ei i 
demands the most important elective office in the gift of the peo- 
ple, and as campaign thunder, so to speak, he would continue to 
operate the same old smut mill and still further agitate the 
public by persecuting citizens in whose prosecution for crime he 
has failed utterly and ridiculously. Does not Mr. Heney demand 
too much compensation for the product of his smut factory ami 
for immunity baths? 

Now, it is not the purpose of this article to either condemn oi 
justify those against whom indictments for corrupting public 
officials are awaiting a hearing before the law. It is the bungling 
and inefficient conduct of the prosecution in the premises that 
the News Letter protests against. It is apparent, and has been 
all along, that the whole business of the prosecution is to make 
political capital out of the misfortunes of not only the munici- 
pality, but of its commercial and industrial life. Nothing could 
be clearer than the spirit that has actuated the prosecution all 
along. It may be said, indeed, that the incentive was conceived 
by personal hatred and born of jealousy — a purely socialistic 
conception of a remedy for the ills the city has suffered because 
of the official rascality of the Board of Supervisors. Capitalism 
was charged with having corrupted and bribed the Supervisors 
to grant a valuable franchise. And, socialistic-like, the first 
thought of the prosecution was to wash the bribe-takers in an 
immunity bath so that they might be free to turn State's evidence 
against the alleged bribe-givers and beneficiaries of the franchise. 

In all the months the trial or trials of capitalism have been 
occupying the attention of the courts, the only indictment that 
has stuck is the one that connected the Mayor and Supervisors 
with their go-between who received the bribe money from John 
Doe, no known individual having as yet been identified as the 
bribe-giver, and divided among the imnuincs. Meanwhile the 
socialistic attack, through the District Attorney, upon John Doe, 
the unknown, has steadily spread in its influence to other lands, 
until political and judicial San Francisco is a stench in the nos- 
trils of the body politic of all nations, and immeasurably injured 
the social and commercial standing of our otherwise glorious city. 



A_n Egyptian Road. 



Slightly cast of the great Pyramid 
of Cheops, at Gizeh, there has been 
unearthed a great highway built by 
the ancients. There is no reason for mentioning this fael 

that it can be made use of to p «] or adorn a tale for 

the modern. The purpose of this big easier 

the transportation of material for the big tomb. This road was 
in perfect shape [our thousand yeare before the time of the birth 
of Christ. Tne part of the causeway so far unearthed is -till 
in an almost perfect condition. Herodotus tells us that it took 
one hundred thousand men ten years to build the greal I auseway 
from Memphis to the pyramid. 

The ' i as a commercial nation waned with 

the destruction of its roads, and with the gradual elimination of 
the road building policy by its rulers. Then came Babylon, and 
the era of its glory as a commercial and military nation was 
builded entirely on the good roads policy. 

Carthage .ante next as the dictator in the world's affairs, and 

its perfect roads and splendid intercommunication systems only 

made it possible for it to resist the onslaugh savage 

Roman foe as long as it did. Borne was a conqueror, hut it also 

was an apt scholar, and soon it had taken first rank in the ua 

se, and oid of its road building. 

In a \\<w decades. So best roads the world 

r known. It is estimated that under pi uions 

the Appiau Way would cost at least $200, > a mile to build. 

When Borne fell, then road btfilding was discontinued all over 
the world, and for a timi all was The whole world took 

backward. 
The world's history furnishes us with three really . 
builders : Louis the Fourteenth. Napoleon Bonaparte, and Tre- 

_ . another Frenchman. Of the la 1 and Ha 

are but imitators. 

>f the French road of to-day that this installment on the 
roads will ar the following in mind: 

All good roads are copied after the French - 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 



parte in general design of intercommunication, and in particular 
construction after Tresauget. There is nothing new on the sub- 
ject at all. The French have perfected the care of the roads, 
that is all. Now, you Californians, listen. 

Here is the care of roads once built, as laid down by Tresau- 
get and improved upon and in practice in France to-day. Daily 
reports by inspectors of every yard of national road throughout 
the country. The whole system is under the supervision of a 
national general inspector of Highways and Bridges, and he is 
responsible for every mile. His army of assistants see that all 
ditches are kept clear and open. Holes and ruts are filled as 
quickly as they appear, sand and earth removed after every rain. 
Trees and bushes are kept trimmed, and the rule is, that a single 
horse may at any time cover eighteen miles of road, dragging be- 
hind him with ease a weight which a dozen oxen could not drag 
over the bogs which are called highways in our common country 
— North, South, East and West: And all this care, all this main- 
tenance of the roads of France, instead of increasing taxation, 
diminish it, because of the increased and increasing prosperity of 
the people. Poor roads are an economical waste, and in the next 
issue of the News Letter the cold dollar reason for good roads 
will be given. Californians should heed the advice of the News 
Letter and organize good roads in every county of the State and 
every cross road should have its established and powerful good 
roads club. 



Suttee County to 
Have Good Roads. 



Sutter County is agitating for a 
bond issue of $100,000 to make a 
start on good road building in that 
county. The campaign begun by 
the News Letter some time ago has brought the men in various 
counties to the fore who are capable and in favor of good roads. 
It is gradually being realized that good roads mean prosperity, 
and, in fact, that perfect highways are almost an insurance 
against hard times. 

Supervisor E. J. White is at the front in this movement in 
Sutter County, and he is deserving of all praise for his initiative 
and enterprise. It is more than probable that in the very near 
future the E. J. Write Good Roads Club will be founded and a 
general campaign in favor of better means of vehicular trans- 
portation and communication be begun. Mr. White is now ask- 
ing for three roads, one from historic Yuba City to Live Oak ; 
one from Yuba City to Meridian; and the third from Yuba City 
to Nicolaus. It is estimated that these side hill roads may be 
built at the very reasonable cost of $1,500 a mile. This would, 
under present conditions as to population, add ten cents to the 
tax levy. The countv is now reported as assessed for about 
$8,000,000. 



It is a pity about the heirs and de- 
"The Last Spike." scendants of the seventy millionaires 

whose faces show so prominently in 
the painting, "The Last Spike," which has hung for a long time 
in the Park Museum, but is to be taken away if somebody does 
not pay the heirs of Hill, the artist, $10,000 for the picture. If 
there was ever an occasion when the public should not be called 
upon to contribute, this is the one. The people who should make 
a late reparation for the months of work put in on the work 
are the descendants themselves. They are all rich; there are 
hundreds of them, and no one is so much interested in keeping 
the picture in the State as they are. 

Hill painted the picture on an order of the late Leland Stan- 
ford, on the understanding that those who were represented in it 
were to club together and pay him $50,000 for the enormous piece 
of work. Hill set about the task conscientiously, and com- 
pleted the monumental labor. And, considering what was asked 
of him to do, he did a splendid piece of work. He chose the final 
act which united the two continents when all the wealthy Califor- 
nians were present. In the. center of the picture stands the fig- 
ure of Stanford, perhaps a little more prominently than the rest. 
Whether Hill thought Stanford deserved the distinction or 
whether he wanted to show his gratitude for the order, he did 
undoubtedly give Stanford prominence. This cut him off from 
the $50,000. When the picture was submitted, the other big men 
in the railroad company did not like it, and Stanford, to show 
that he did not mean to shove himself so much to the fore, re- 
pudiated the agreement with Hill. So Hill got nothing for his 
labors. 

This is an ancient story now. The men in the picture are 



dead, and their descendants are certainly above continuing such 
a petty quarrel. This fact remains : Hill was never paid ; his 
descendants feel that they ought to be ; and, if they are not, they 
threaten to sell the huge canvas in the East. 

Now come the rich descendants of the millionaires of the last 
generation, and say they think it would be a touching tribute on 
the part of the citizens of California to raise the $10,000 neces- 
sary by popular subscription. Would it not be more of a touching 
tribute for those who inherited these great fortunes to give just 
a bit of it to pay an honest debt to an artist ? 



The Case of 
Captain Conboy. 



The shadow of death having passed, 
though left partially paralyzed for 
life, young Bernard Lagan, who was 
shot by Captain of Police Conboy, in 
a drunken frenzy, is inclined to feel charitable. Who does not, 
when he feels once more the breath of life and knows that he has 
been spared? But does that relieve Conboy of his responsibility? 
Was he any the less drunk ? 

If this had been the first tune Conboy ever got too free with 
his gun, it would be different, but he knows what happens to 
him when the liquor is in his veins, so that he is even more 
culpable than if he had done the shooting when sober. 

Members of the police department remember how Conboy once 
before, in the heat of drunkenness, came into a bar where an 
enemy was drinking. Seeing the reflection in the glass, Conboy 
opened fire on it, smashing the glass where his enemy's head 
shown reflected. He would have killed then, and meant to. 

Lagan, who will always carry a bullet close to his spinal chord, 
and will never recover the use of his whole body, asks to have 
the charges dropped against Captain Conboy, but his brothers 
and sisters are of a far different mind. They intend to devote 
themselves to seeing Conboy get the fullness of his punishment. 
They hope to see his star stripped off first, then a trial for at- 
tempted murder, followed by a long term in the penitentiary. 

The police are, of course, inclined to stand by Conboy. This 
is only a natural feeling regarding any one in the same organiza- 
tion, but the police carry it further than any other class. To 
their mind there is no crime on the calendar so heinous as "re- 
sisting an officer." If Lagan had shot Conboy under the cir- 
cumstances under which Conboy shot him, the police would in a 
body be a-thirst for Lagan's blood. A little bit more of a 
sense of justice and less of authority would help the police here 
as elsewhere. Good officers are fine fellows, brave and humane, 
but the average policeman anywhere in the world is a brute the 
moment any one refuses to bow to his will immediately. No 
living man should have such power as the police have without a 
severe punishment attaching for infringement on the rights of 
individuals. Man is too much inclined to be overbearing to have 
absolute power. 



t 




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EXCEUSIVE * 

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No Branch Stores. No Agents. 



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We've Done Some 
"Price-Chiseling" 




anciscn. 



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Interested? 



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present to our patrons "the best clothes made." 



Jewelers Building, Poft Street, near Kearny, San Francisco 



.Tflv 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 




0WNGRIHC 






M 



Those persons who question the truth of Ibsen's character 

delineations should have been at the morgue on .Saturday last 
when the inquest into the death of Mrs. Lorena de la Montanya 
was being conducted by Coroner Leland. Mrs. Margaret Patton, 
the shrewd woman friend of the deceased, whose talent for fib- 
bing puzzled a city full of reporters and police, was on the stand, 
and Dr. Leland asked for her opinion regarding the death of 
Mrs. de la Montanya. "I do not think she committed suicide," 
replied the witness, with a cold-blooded analysis quite worthy of 
an Ibsen, "because if she had, she would not have shot herself 
in the head. She thought so much of her looks." That a woman 
— even Hedda Gabler — would differentiate between a "beautiful" 
and an unbeautiful suicide has ever been one of the most violent 
Ibsen controversies; but here we have a woman in real life who 
calmly gives her friend credit for that morbid estheticism. Was 
the Ibsen parallel carried further in that tragedy? Did Robert 
G. Hanford have ''vine leaves in his hair" on the evening of 
gallantry ? 

Yes, even the women arc milder than they used to be. We 

hear much about the London suffragettes rushing the police off 
their beats or coming over to New York and attacking Broadway 
with hurdy-gurdy and tambourine — but think of whal dauntless 
women have done in the past! There is that virile — if that ad- 
jective can be applied to a woman — favorite <jf mine. Dona Maria 

de Monroy, who married into the great I se of Benriquez of 

Seville. She was a contemporary of Ferdinand and [sabella. The 
Dona Maria was left a widow with two young -inns. The boys 
were foully murdered when they were eighteen and nineteen, re- 
spectively, by two gentlemen of Seville, named Mancano. After 
the crime, the gentlemen fled to Portugal, the Dona Maria in 
pursuit, wearing man's attire :uul attended h\ a score of cava- 
liers. She trapped them in a house, with her own trusty sword 
cut off their heads, and befori i he alarm could be given their 
friends and associates, had escaped had, over the border into 
Spain and deposited her iron- trophies on the lombg of her slain 
sons. Woman's rights is noi so new a fad, after all. 

The Board of Supervisors has assumed an inter 

task. It is going to re-name all the numerical avenues in Rich- 
mond and Sunset. In other words, to express First, Second, 
Third, etc., in terms of great men or popular vegetables. \ l 

present there are numerically name, I Btreets south Ol Market and 
in the Mission, ami numerically named avenues, Burnai 
"South" down near the county line. There has been i 
Now for the selection of names for the aem streets. Forty-nine 
designations will be required. Why not leave it to popular vote? 
But that would hardly do. We might, in that contingency, wake 
up some morning to and ourselves living on Battling Nelson 

avenue, comer of (if '.here were woman Suffi 

reel 

This man Christian ('. Johnson may not have had 

icr matrimonial record than, say, Nat C. Goodwin. But there 
is" this difference: G lelieving that nothing like 

succession, has decorously driven tandem, with the singletree of 
divon iting each team mate from the other. Johnson 

the Roman chariot style of Having his helpmates under a simul- 
taneous matrimonial yoke. At last the hippodrome became too 
tacular, and (he police stepped in to call all bets off. 

The wardens of the State prisons no? 

a year, the highest salaries paid to Stale officers excepting 
Governor. Well, there are so many skillful and talent' 
men gratuitously donating their services to the S 
institutions thai the labor ■ ! at evened up. 

Prof. Clapp, who is lecturing to the students of the sum- 
mer session at the University of Californ a n art 
that Raphael was an imitator. W pity it is 
generation is cursed with so much original genius! 



"Sound the grand piano, boy, let's have ther tune." 

That is the opening line for the Byron Mauzy marching club 
song. Byron Mauzy, as a piano, is "grand," "upright" or 
"square," whichever shape you like. As a candidate for ' 
the question is more open. The lyre has been in the Mayors 
chair for two years now, and in the terrible pasl there was a vio- 
lin somewhere around. There is a trombone in the office of school 
superintendent — this municipal orchestra has a queer orches- 
tration. But would it do to have a grand piano for Mayor? 
Paderewski might be made superintendent of streets, with the 
privilege of mopping them up with his hair, under such an ad- 
ministration. 

On the day that John E. Benson, the timber accumulator, 

linally went to jail there was another timber accumulator of no 
mean ability circulating about the St. Francis Hotel. As he 
went about the lobby he seemed ever to be chuckling to himself. 
It might have been my imagination that conjured those chuckles, 
but I believe they were real and volitional — for the second man 
was Dr. Edward Perrin, who once engaged the experienced Ben- 
son to accumulate some timber for him, and nearly was sent to 
jail himself for his pains. As Benson was going toward Ingle- 
side, who would be more apt to chuckle than Perrin — if you 
know how the doctor feels on the subject. 

The "Girl in Blue" has been stopped from performing her 

Salome dance in New York. What is the matter with the shade ? 
Nowadays to be naughty-naughty you must be concealed in blue. 
"The Blue Mouse" was considered risque and daring, by those 
whose broad experience enabled them to appreciate the risqueness 
of the situations, and now the "Girl in Blue" gets in trouble. 
And blue used once to be considered such a spirituelle shade, too. 
There were those paragons of domesticity, "Two Little Girls in 
Blue." It was a color that was never off-color. But there is 
another thought. Maybe this Salome "(iirl in Blue" had left 
off her blue when the magistrate saw her. 

Just at. present the word i- thai Presidenl Tafl is com- 
ing West to attend the Portola festival. We want the President, 
naturally. Without the Portola carnival his presence here would 
l,e a fete in itself, and with Gaspar de Portola reincarnated as 

his companion in our pageant, enthusiasm will he unbounded. 

But in view of the variegated reports we have of the ooiuinu. I 

wonder sometimes if Presidenl Taft is do! standing by some 
gigantic Burbank daisy, tugging away ai the petals, one by one. 
and murmuring soulfullv: "I'm going West, "I'm not going 
West." We hope thai now he lias pulled oil' the climactic petal. 

Thaw is up for re-examination Better let 

well enough alone. I ! the trouble that lias come 

about since the first Thaw I by the 

-(ringing up of tins prime favorite with the exponents of the un- 
written law. A little hempen rope in time saves much treasure. 





///// : 



Large reductions on Summer 
Apparel in every Department 
Garments which are specially 
adapted for vacation and out- 
ing wear. 

GRANT AVENUE AND GEARY ST. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 





WOMKOK 



Since important political and international questions have 
occupied the Transatlantic British cable wires, I had almost 
forgotten that there was a king in England. During the horse- 
racing season we hear of him occasionally, but when there is a 
great issue before the British people, naturally the sovereign is 
relegated to the interior lines. But it has appeared this week 
that there is a king in England, and that he exerted the most 
tremendous prerogative of majesty — he kept people waiting for 
dinner. 

It happened at the dinner given by United States Ambassador 
AVhitelaw Beid to King Edward, Queen Alexandria and some 
others. The despatches do not say at what time dinner was to 
have been served, but do state that it was not served at that time. 
The king sat in to a bridge game during the evening, anil bis 
royal highness held such good hands that he wouldn't budge 
until 12:30, while the ambassadorial palace was filled with starv- 
ing wretches waiting the royal pleasure to get a finger on the 
oyster forks. 

During the meal, the despatch continued, the king seemed 
most amused, and the queen was seen to laugh heartily. Possibly 
the king and queen had visited the royal pantry before they 
started out, and were laughing at the joke played by His Majesty 
on the less provident. The London rule now is : When you go 
to dine with royalty, take a sandwich in your pocket. 
* * * 

W. B. Hearst has decided that his presence is needed in San 
Francisco, and as a result, the Examiner force is standing on tip- 
toe waiting for the jolt which Willie always sets up on his arrival. 
The "Longest Leased" editor in the world has his pockets bulging 
with plans for the new building, and murderer Cunningham will 
be responsible for the speedy erection of the building. Hearst 
had his nose for news put out of joint by the Call scoop on that 
story. He peppered the office with indignant wires and received 
in reply this laconic answer : "Cunningham was hunting for the 
Examiner, but couldn't find it!" The Chronicle regarded the 
scoop as a "fluke," one of those times when a paper shakes with 
Destiny for beer. The murderer did not stumble in their office, 
bad luck. But worse luck to the Examiner, he was really looking 
for that paper. This is the third time within the month that 
the Examiner has lost a story merely because the willing deliv- 
erer of the goods could not find the office. So Hearst has been 
forced to come out and fill up his hole in the ground. 



One of the most remarkable instances 
of the crafty, dishonest practices of shys- 
ter lawyers has just come to my notice. 
It seems that a certain client of a promi- 
nent attorney, of highest standing, had 
the progress of her case closely watched 
by a firm of shysters. At a timely moment, 
the shyster, who had nothing whatever to 
do with the case, filed a certain legal docu- 
ment which seemed to them opportune. 
They thus .received some advertisement. 
and also had done something for which 
they might strike the client for a fee. 
Fortunately, the real attorney discovered 
the trick in time and balked the game of 
the crooked shysters. Such incidents are 
only too common in the practice of the law 
and cause legitimate counsel no end of 
annoyance. 



geons, and dentists. All of these voluntarily devote largely of 
their services to charity, giving of their skill free of charge to 
the deserving poor. But they are also imposed upon enormously 
by people perfectly able to pay. Their calling is humane, and 
there are emergencies where there is not time to investigate the 
patient's honesty or ability to pay. Immediate attendance is 
necessary. The doctor does his work, sends in his bill in proper 
time, and from time to time, to be laughed at for his pains by 
people far better off financially than he is. He must sue, and 
unless his bill is a very large one, the suit will cost him more than 
he will get out of it if he wins. Lawyers may sue with slight 
cost to themselves. Other professional people and tradesmen 
have plenty of time to consider before undertaking work or sell- 
ing their goods. The doctors are the greatest sufferers, and there 
are some skillful, industrious ones in this city to-day suffering 
financial hardships, yet having thousands of dollars due them 

from dead-beat patients. 

* * * 

Bobert A. Boos seems to be accomplishing wonders in the East 
in booming the Portola festival. He has arrayed the school 
children of New York on the side of Gaspar and San Francisco, 
and had a conference with President Taft and other Washington 
citizens. That "Bob" Boos had the energy to cruise around on 
such an adventure none of the fellows who knew him in his 
rather recent college days at Berkeley doubted, but that he could 
travel in such fast company is surprising. "Bob" Boos's most 
astounding feat at college was getting a military commission be- 
fore he had been there what was considered the requisite time. 
Under the rules of the university military commissions in the 
cadet corps were only awarded seniors. In his junior year Boos 
aspired for senior standing in the military. He saw that by 
getting a year's Head-start of his contemporaries he would have 
a chance of becoming Major-General of Cadets, or something 
like that. So he told of his vague prospects for completing his 
college work in three years, and that before he passed out he 
wanted a commission. The amiable Captain Henry de Witt 
Waite, commandant of Cadets at that time, accepted Boos's 
story, and he was appointed a lieutenant while his class-mates 
were sergeants. It was a great and a proud year for "Bobby" 
Boos. Doubtless he felt more exalted then than he has since. 

* * * 

Some of the big millionaires of New York have had a falling 
out with their pocket-books on account of their consciences. 
There are a few that have made returns for tax purposes that 
actually bring their holdings somewhere near the truth. Bocke- 
feller and Mrs. Sage head the list of those who are approximating 
that condition of mind. Pierpont Morgan and the Vanderbilts 
are still far short of the angelic state when conscience is working 
overtime to repair past errors. It wouldn't be a bad idea to have 
the desire to make truthful returns afflict some of the rich in 
San Francisco. Millions in property in this city are so under- 
valued that the poor man really bears the brunt of taxation. The 
rich are proverbially bankrupt of the truth when it comes to 
paying duty on imports or in making tax returns to the collector. 
Had I my way, I would arbitrarily fix the valuations and collect 



There is a class of professional men 
who are victimized probably more than 
any others, or than any tradespeople, by 
dead-beats. They are physicians, sur- 




July 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



the tax at the poinl of a gnm. The next, year the rates would 
he reduced by half. The shirker is the one who makes the high 

taxes. 

* * * 

A number of young gentlemen, and some not so young, are 
living to back each other up in the determination not to wear 
hats. Like all mortals, they must have a club organized about 
it. so they have met once at the Fairmont and denounced all 
headpieces as the devil's own assistants. The "No Hat Club" 
is the banner under which they would come down town in the 
morning without a protection against the sun and rain. 

The question arises whether these gentlemen have not enough 
courage individually to go without a hat if it appeals to them 
to do so. Why form a club? They are not the first to have 
left oft wearing hats. Perbaps they want public announcement 
made of it. so when they parade the streets, their scant locks, 
blowing in the breeze, they will not be taken for freaks. 

But let them have a club if they will. Tt is certainly a good 
movement. Bald heads are not attractive, and there is no ques- 
tion, whatever the scalp specialists may say, that hats bring bald- 
ness. If no one wore hats, there would be no bald heads. 

There is one big private school in this country, the ultra-fash- 
ionable Groton, application for admission to which is made for 
children at birth, where the boys are not allowed to wear hats 
at all. In consequence, when they get to Harvard — they all go 
there — they have a thick growth on their heads which lasts them 
for years. 

Not to wear a hat becomes a necessity. Those who are used to 
going without, cannot bring themselves to keep one on continu- 
ously afterwards. Their heads get too hot, and they walk down 
the street with their hats in their bands half the time. 

Let there be a club, then : make a fad of it, as if it were green 
hats or hipless gowns. Every one will do it then, and the crop 
of hair will again be good in the land. 

* * * 

Colonel William P. Tucker, alleged dipsomaniac and officer 
in the United States army, has added to his laurels by marrying 
the relic in the wifely line of P.nlph Piatt, former lieutenant 
commissary of the Second Oregon regiment. Ralph Piatt bore 
the distinction with pride of being the only man who was an 
officer in the celebrated Second Oregon who was not a gentleman. 
His treatment of his first wife was outrageous, and tin ■ second 
wife, although able to cope with most men. had a terrible time 
with Piatt. She. however, is no angel. Tucker had her for 
nurse in sickness and in drunken recoveries, and Eel] in love with 
her and dropped his own wife, a most estimable woman, on her 
account, Tf there is anything in being well-mated, Tucker and 
his wife should he "happy forever afterward." 

* * * 

The mercurial Frenchman, Ponlet, is now at Berkeley, and be 

is busy separating the French from the Spanish in the i 
He has forgotten bis speech to Jordan in the busy time 
paration for the opening of the tall semester. Tf Foulet wants 
to call liars all who take the ground that Prance is decadent, he 
will have to fight oodles and oodles of people — for there arc 

others. Professor .Jordan has tots of company, and the latest 

one to take exceptions to Foulet and the News Letter in the 

stand thai Prance is not in decay and dissolution is an en 
scholar who holds that with the elimination of religion, &t 
coincident, lie ; s quoted by German and English newspapers 
in justification of the statements of Jordan and others. 

* • • 

Miss Florence Roberts undoubtedly lias the temperament re- 
quired tor the sole of Sapho. But when Thnrlow Bergen at 
to support her in the role, he lias something else beside tempera- 
ment to consider. For the supporting man in that ill-famed play 
has more to do than simply to support his star; he must pack 
her up a steep flight of stairs. Now, Miss Louise Brownel! 
might not have the temperament necessary for Sapho to such 
a refined degree as it appears in Miss Roberts — but she weighs 
just about one-half what the star weighs. The question is : was 
Thurlow Bergen tickled to death when Miss Roberts was unable 
to appear in the title role one night last week, and the feather- 
weight Miss Brownell substituted: 

* • * 

Judging by their pictures, as published in the daily papers, the 
two Mexican affinities who have again to cross into the land of 
the tortilla and the enchilada, are the most undesirable of our 
late arrivals. Imagine two such people starting an anti-race 



suicide club in California ! The breeding possibilities of the low- 
class Mexican are well known. Such people are wisely kepi out. 
We have too many law-breakers among us now ami. if there is 
any value in statistical deductions, heredity is a curse to the land 
where such people thrive and multiply, for the trails of the par- 
ents are carried on for generation and generation. 

* * * 

The sleek and unctuous Benson must at last go to prison. The 
spitter of Corte Madera must also don the stripes. Tt is demon- 
strated that wealth in California is not a bar to the penitentiary 
much as the howling Heneys may yell their splenetic denuncia- 
tions at the judiciary. It is of record now that millions make 
no difference in the courts of the State of California, provided 
the proof of guilt exists. Between proof and the attempt to log- 
roll or railroad a man to prison in satisfaction of a private 
grudge, gratified at public expense, is a long step. 



"Judge, did you ever try an absinthe frappe?" 

I've tried a lot of fellows who have." — Exchange. 



: 'No ; but 



FOR 

300 YEARS 



THE WORLD'S 

MOST 

FAMOUS 

CORDIAL 




LIQUEUR 



PERES CHARTREUX 



-GREEN AND YELLOW— 



At first-class Wine Merchants. Grocers. Hotels. Cafes. 

Batjer & Co . 45 Broadway. New York, N. Y. 

Sole Agents for United States. 




New York K^Ef^jZ/fl^fffaW P ar ' s 

/>VC uOPOD* TtO 

New Location B9-143 Geary Street, between Grant Ave. and Stockton 



Phenomenal Sale of Waists 
at $4.95— $6.95 

Embroidered Chiffon, Lace Net, Applique 
Lingerie, Messaline. in black and all 
colors, at one-half and less than one-half 
their regular value. 



Murphy Grant & Company 

Wholesale Dry Goods 

N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets. San Francisco. 

New Goods constantly arrivine and on sale. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 



A foung iHatnm a Imprpastotts nf Wut Bk^stvupn ^ottl £>nrotg 



Bt Harriet W'atson Capwell. 



I am convinced that everything I have ever read about San 
Francisco was wilfully mendacious, and everything I have ever 
been told was extremely evasive. I don't see now how I ever 
traveled West without "paying excess baggage on preconi 
notions. We Lave been here just a week, and in that time all my 
impressions have had to have a change of linen three times a day. 
Hereafter, Vihen I am gathering second-hand information I shall 
insist on having it in collapsible form like a Chinese lantern — 
one might as well be thrifty about stowing away damaged facts. 

Tor example, the hotels' that 1 constructed in my imagina- 
tion were pegged down on shifting bits of information gleaned 
from somewhere, and 1 fancied that in spite of their splendor 
there would be something audaciously Western — ssh! (like a 
cuspidor in the ladies' writing room. ) Oh, memory of a visit to 
Seattle! But as far as external; go, your fashionable hotels 
might have their foundations on Fifth avenue. I was a little 
disappointed at first, for like every traveler, I wanted to see local 
color laid on by the brush of a scene painter. I remembered 
Kipling's Palace Hotel clerk, who, against a background of mar- 
ble splendor, picked his teeth and laconically assigned the dis- 
tinguished guest to first floor, front. A native has since told me 
that even as many years ago as Kipling's visit, toothpicks had 
gone out and finger-bowls come in, and no one who knew his 
San Francisco ever credited that Kipling's picture was varnished 
with a pure solution of Truth. 

When the process of re-adjustment was completed. I found 
that there was no reason to feel disappointed. The hotels and 
the service they give may not differ a finger's breadth from the 
Plaza and the St. Eegis, but the people who come and go through 
the swinging doors are cut off a bolt of cloth that was never 
woven east of the Eocky Mountains. The seven seas across, the ( 
wide world over, furnished the woof and the warp, and dyed it in 
the flaming gold of a yellow poppy field with hair stripes of even- 
other shade and tone and nuance. New York is cosmopolitan, 
but its quarters are widely separated, and the currents do not 
meet in the great stream that flows around the fashionable hotels. 
The men and women one sees there are all in replica — their 
tailors and dressmakers obey the same creed. But the very first 
luncheon we had at the Fairmont we observed some pretty young 
girls of distinctly Italian type chatting around a charmingly 
decorated table. We were told that it was an engagement lunch- 
eon to the daughter of an Italian commission merchant, whose 
picturesque home is still in the Xorth Beach quarter. The girls 
were dressed in a compromise with the mode — their clothes and 
hats patterned more or less after the fashion, but expressed in 
an Italian warmth of color that one would never see in such a 
setting in Xew York. At dinner at the St. Francis the next 
night we fancied we were in Berlin, for at the nearest table sat 
a party of Germans, with their manner and clothes as i ■■•■■■ ■■■! 
as their speech. The point is, that with equal length of 
residence in New York and large wealth, in the matter of exter- 
nals, at least, these very people would be rolled and ironed and 
smoothed into complete semblance with any other fashionable. 

I have met several important members of the smart set here, 
and have had others pointed out to me at the hotels. Of course, 
in a week one cannot tie many knots in acquaintance, but pos- 
sibly impressions untampered by friendship, are apt to be must 
unbiased. 

At any rate, my impression of society women here is that taken 
singly they dress well, but that in general neither the men nor the 
women that one sees at a hotel look as smart as in Xew York-, 
but the throng is ever so much more interesting. So many people 
know each other that at a crowded hour at either the St, Francis 
or the Fairmont one could imagine one were in a private home, 
instead of a hotel. First names are bandied about so that a 
stranger at the St. Francis could not help knowing that Miss 
Crocker's first name is "Jennie." One luncheon hour I counted 
twenty people who greeted her as "Jennie." I do not vet know 
the name of the blonde young matron who is always with her, 
for as yet I have not discovered any one without the privilea 
of calling her "Mary." I know she is a matron because people 
always inquire after her children, "little Mary and Eleanor." 



People talk across tables here, and visit about — quite natural, 
considering that almost every one is on a howdy-do footing. In 
New York such is not the case, but even were it so, I hope that 
the voices would be pitched more melodiously. Such unre- 
strained chatter as one hears at the hotels here ! Such sky- 
bi raper voices! Why should I, a perfect stranger, know that 
some girl called "Dolly" by her friends, evidently society girls, 
"is going to visit Mrs. Fry, now that Douglas is through college," 
ca ? Ami yet how can I help knowing it, when it is jammed 
into my ear by the clamorous babble of that group of pretty 
girls at my right, whose voices have never been tamed. Why 
should I know that a stunning young matron called Edna, whom 
I happened to learn is a Mrs. Taylor, "hasn't eaten sweets or 
starch for a month, and is trying to get as thin as Georgie." 
These, and many more things 1 know, as shouldn't, but who can 
help it in San Francisco, where voices evidently grow as large as 
Emits and flowers. 

Since my observation of San Francisco women has so far 
largely been confined to hotels, I have naturally observed the 
manner in which they acquit themselves of that rather unesthetic 
but very necessary fund ion — eating. The pleasures of the palate, 
seemingly, are like everything else, less effete here than in New 
York. A group of San Francisco women lunching or tea-ing 
make a more robust affair of it. T was surprised at the number 
of courses served at Mrs. Carolan's luncheon table the other day. 
She. herself, ate sparingly, but it seemed a ponderous order, and 
one of her guests fell ponderously upon it. In the matter of 
tipping, women the world over are accused of meagre generosity, 
and in a dozen trips abroad and a great deal of jaunting along 
the Atlantic Coast, I was convinced that there was reason in this. 
But out here the women seem to tip more lavishly. Some inatini t 
instructs even a stranger to sort out society, near-society, and 
undesirables. Their outward trappings are alike, but one accus- 
tomed to analyzing manner seldom makes a mistake. I feel safe 
in saying that I have sifted the people properly who congregate 
here at the hotels, and can tell who's who by instinct as well as 
by -nap information. And I would say that here, as everywhere, 
the undesirables tip most lavishly, the climbers lavishly, and the 
"real thing" with some restraint. For the people with position 
to ion jure with, know that their presence adds lustre to a hotel, 
and the hirelings catch the spirit of the management, and cater 
to them without luscious fees. I saw Mrs. Eleanor Martin and 
three young girls get the most perfect service, and the tip was 
only 50 cents, whereas a less important person could never re- 
turn to the same place and expect attention. 



The San Francisco woman is a woman of taste, and she- 
knows the real thing in style when she sees it. Paris is in her 
eye, for Paris is the model of fashions feminine. "The Bonnet 
Shop," importers of Parisian millinery, at 121 Geary street, em- 
bodies in all its displays all that is "chic" in the very latest 
Paris modes in headgear for women. The hats are strictly tail- 
ored and are snappy and smart in design and color. 



A SKIN OF BEAUTY IS A JOY FOREVER 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles. Moth-Patches), 
Rash and Skin Diseases, and every blemish on 
beauty, and defies detection. It hai Mood the let! 
of 60 years; no other has, and is so harmless, we 
taste it to be sure it is properly made Accept no 
counterfeit of similar name. The distinguished Dr. 
L. A.Sayressidloafadyofthebaat-ton(a patient): 
"At yon ladies will use (hem, I recommend *Coo- 
raud'i Cream' as tbe least harmful of all the Skin 
preparations." t 

For sale by all Druggists and Fancy Goods Dealers. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET POWDER 

For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures Sun - 
bum and renders an excellent complexion. Price 25 CenLs, by Mail. 

GOURAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 

Removes Superfluous Hair. Price $1.00, by mail 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Prop'r. }7 Great Jones St.. New York C-y. 





July 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 




(Tlie accompanying poster ica.s designed and executed by R. 
W. Borough, a capable newspaper artist of San Francisco.) 

Portola! The word comes sweeping 
Ou the fresh bay breezes, Leaping, 
Rising, falling, cadence keeping. 
Rhythmic cadence, as it swells. 
Lifts the veil from arch and tower, 
Pins it back with mask and flower, 
Showing deeds Of purpose, power. 

Where the Queen of Oceans dwells; 

Portola ! The word of greeting. 
Born of joy and Ian eting. 

Queen, once loved, is queen forever : 
Feuds may rend, disasters sever. 
Bui the loyal lips will never 
Kiss another royal hand: 
What has come of woe or glory 
Will lie told in song and story 
\g''s hence by muostrela hoary. 
11 true subjects of her land: 
qotb, all, we give you greet 
Rorn of hope and courage meeting. 

ild and starlet, fearless, daunting. 
n her roofs and steeples flaunting 
Canopy the happy vaunting 
Of this child upon a throne — 
Elf and queen — in beauty rising. 
Willi her subjects fraternizing. 
Every golden chalice prizing. 
Come again into her own. 
Comrades, friends, we give yen greeting 
Rorn of Sage and Folly meeting. 

Mabel Porter Pitts. 



(JPueatuma of % Sag 



Editor Sun Francisco News Letter. 

Sir — Are you satisfied with your conclusion ("sensible"?) thai 
it is impossible for an unfortunate man to ask himself the ques- 
tion, "What would Jesus do?" in every detail of life as it is to- 
day ? 

There are, surely, only a very few of us, in some nineteen hun- 
dred years, who have taught and practiced sounder and surer 
true life philosophy than Jesus (Savior) Christ (Anointed). 

Granted that it is not so easy to find Christ in Market street, 
or on the summit of Santa Ynez or in the Cassitar Pass, but 
nevertheless you can meet him in the eye of every occupant of a 
perambulator and in a few gentle men and women. 

Christ was not in a hurry. He suffered and was patient. Im- 
patience and pressing are our American habits, and they create 
a curse, leading to nervous prostration, dementia Americana and 
death of body and corruption of spirit, because we prefer the 
Golden Calf to a decent amount, of self-discipline and denial 
a la Christ. 

The Smi of God was a sportsman (he took the greatest chance 
vet) and he was a gentle man. 

Even to the importunities of a hook agent or to a slap in (he 
face "He answered not a word." 

Please reconsider your implied inferences that Jesus is not 
down to date. He has even been at Carpenters' Hall — of all 
places in the world. 

In any event, Christ did not pretend to have the last word, ex- 
cept through the comforter, the Holy Ghost. 

Yours truly, 

Santa Rarbara. Christopher Rowley. 



Emperor William of Germany has signed the muchly- 
contested motor liability law which now becomes a stern reality. 
It remains to be seen what influence it will have on the trade. 



E. B. COUR-VOISIER, 

Art Dealer, Frame Maker. New store, 431 Sutter street, be- 
tween Stockton and Powell. 



WEDDING PRESENTS. 

The choicest variety to select from at Marsh's, corner Cali- 
fornia and Polk streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Announcement 



The Tozer Co. 



beg to announce that they 
are now permanently loca- 
ted at 228 Grant Ave. Next to 
"White House. Second floor. 



Fine Wall Papers, Draperies, and Interior 
Decorating 



Telephone Douglas 186t 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 



Oftft iHtntefrr of ifamgn Affairs 



The powers signatory of the Alge- 
Rebellions in Morocco, ciras Contention to settle the dis- 
pute between France and Germany 
concerning the military occupancy of Morocco, are about to be 
called upon to readjust the agreement. The conditions are far 
more intricate and possibly more difficult of settlement now than 
in 1906, and the indications are that Prance will feel obliged 
to land a sufficiently large army to restore order by permanent 
occupation of the country. In that even! something dangerous 
to the peace of Europe is likely to occur, for Germany is not at 
all satisfied with the Algeciras compact, which", through the in- 
fluence of Great Britain and France, with the indirect aid of 
Spain, was given the right to establish a police system with sol- 
diers in Morocco, which was the equivalent of giving to France 
the cream of Moroccan commerce and blinking privileges. The 
compact was a signal defeat of German bluster and diplomacy, 
and the sore has never healed up. But since the Algeciras con- 
vention was held, the situation in Europe has been radically 
changed, and a very small spark of a dispute over a revision 
of the Moroccan agreement could very easily be fanned into a 
great international conflagration. At the Algeciras conference 
Russia cast her vote against the demands of Germany for a 
hand in keeping the peace in Morocco, which had the effect prac- 
tically of shutting the Kaiser's country out of profitable trade 
relations with the Moroccans. At that time. Austria-Hungary, 
if not neutral at heart, gave Germany no very hearty support, 
although her delegate hesitated at first to give his approval to 
the treaty. But since that event there has been a radical change 
in the international situation. 

Within the last year, an alliance has been formed between 
Germanv. Russia and Austria-Hungary for two purposes, first, 
to dominate the political situation by holding the balance of 
power, and. second, to acquire territory in the Balkans, in Euro- 
pean Turkey, and in Asia Minor. And now comes Morocco, 
whether influenced by the new Triple Alliance or not, practi- 
cally defying the Algeciras compact, which is pretty sure to re- 
open the whole question that was supposed to have been perma- 
nently settled in favor of France by the convention. And as if 
to insult Spain, the Sultan of Morocco has in a most offensive 
way notified the Spanish Ambassador that his presence at the 
court of Morocco will no longer be tolerated. The real internal 
situation in Morocco is this: Mulia Hafid. the new Sultan, who 
incited a rebellion against his brother and seized the throne. 
turns out to be a prince among tyrants. The consequence is, 
that Malai Kebir, another brother of Hafid, has started 
a rebellion to secure the throne for himself, and is burn- 
ing villages in sight of Fez. the capital, and still another 
pretender, one Bn Hamnra, is organizing an army in the desert 
region to capture the throne. Circumstances are as auspicious 
for German interference as the "Kaiser could wish, but the new 
alignment of the nations may deter him. for, according to the 
Algeciras compact and the recent tripartite agreement between 
Germanv, Russia and Austria-Hungary, Great Britain, France, 
the United States, and Spain and Turkey, would have to stand 
for the integrity of Morocco under French supervision and Span- 
ish arid French policing. Surely this new war cloud Ionics 
black enough. 



A good deal of anxiety is felt over 
What is Japan After? the meaning of Japan's action in 

throwing a large body of troops into 
Moukden, Manchuria, which already had 32,000 men in a forti- 
fied position. The movement is in direct violation of the Ports- 
mouth treaty, but there is no doubt, however, that Japan has 
the consent of England. France and the United States to put 
Moukden in a state of preparedness to move against the Russian 
military and commercial base at Harbin should occasion require. 
The Anglo-Japanese, the Franco-Japanese and the American- 
Japanese rapprochement provides for and obliges Japan to pre- 
serve the integrity of the Far East, thus releasing England, 
Prance and America from the necessity of keeping large squad- 
rons of warships in those waters, and re-inforcing the" garrison 
at Moukden seems to be in keeping with the purpose of the four- 



cornered compact, for occasion to be on the alert is surely upon 
the parties to the rapprochement. In fact, England, France and 
the United States have just put themselves in a position where 
more or less bluffing or real war will have to be used to check a 
hostile movement of Russia against the commercial rights of the 
nations to the Anglo-Far East scheme of mutual protection. 
There has been a suspicion for some time in Peking and St. 
Petersburg diplomatic circles that Russia was concocting a 
scheme with China to practically shut all commercial doors in 
Manchuria, and handicap those in China proper against the 
\ ugl n- Franco- Japanese combine, and open them wider than ever 
to Russian trade and commerce. It is suspicioned, too, that the 
Russo-C'hinese deal provided for territorial concessions and mili- 
tary privileges in Northern Manchuria — a strip of rich country 
whose area is about 1,000 by 200 miles, with Vladivostok as the 
deep water outlet. How much real truth there may be in the al- 
leged Russo-Chinese den] is not clearly known, but it is known 
that England, France and the United States have notified Rus- 
sia that they would not countenance any such '"deal," and pre- 
sumably Japan is concentrating troops at Moukden to be ready 
to "protect the integrity of the Par East" as provided for in the 
Anglo-Franco-Japanese rapprochement. That being the case, 
it is up to Russia, and up to the Germany-Russia-Austria-Hun- 
gary tripartite alliance, to say whether the trade doors of Man- 
churia are to remain open or to be closed against America, 
Great Britain and France. 



Of General Interest. 



The budget of every nation for the 
current fiscal year shows the need 
of higher taxes to provide for rap- 
idly increasing national indebtedness, occasioned mainly by enor- 
mous expenditure of money on war establishments and pre- 
paredness for emergencies. — It is just possible the Young Turks 
are making a grave mistake in raising the cry, "On to Athens, 
on to Greece." Such a movement at this time would be the finish 
of Turkey. — While Russia has gone no further than the mobili- 
zation of troops on Persian soil, no one doubts that the empire 
is about ripe for division and extinction as . an independent 
nation. In this connection, it may be said that the London 
Government suspects treachery on the part of Russia in the 
Persian affair. It is suspected that the Czar is planning for a 
rush campaign to acquire the whole of the Shah's dominions and 
the control of the Persian Gulf, which is the one mighty defense 
of India from European or Asia Minor invasion. Nothing would 
clear the decks of the British navy for action quicker than a pur- 
any nation to acquire conic,,] ,,r flic Persian Gulf, which. 
by the way. is the objective point of Germany's Asia Minor sys- 
tem of railways. 



Murine Is a Domestic Eye Remedy. 
Reliable Relief (or Eyes That Need Care. Doesn't Smart. 



"White Horse" 

Scotch Whiskey 



MACKIE & CO., 

Islay, Scotland 

Never in Bulk 

Charles Meinecke & Co. 



Agents Pacific Coast 



San Francisco 




July 17. 1909 



and California Advertiser 



11 




Hit, 4cr~«-dWJ£ t)IUB jl.s.x-i 

By Barnett Franklin. 
.4 Real Grand Operetta and Other Worth-While Things at the 
Orpheum. 

While some cynical souls have been pooh-poohing, vaudeville 
has been- progressing. It has been forging steadily ahead, 
yesiree ; it has been moving along in the right direction. Drop 
into the Orpheum any of these afternoons or evenings and you 
will bear me out. You will find that the popular entertainment 
of the people has not been standing still. 

Really-truly grand opera in vaudeville. Just think of it! 
And right good grand opera in tabloid form at that. Isn't it 
enough to make the grouchiest of vaudeville's decriers sit up and 
take notice? It sure is. 

Time was when an Orpheum audience refused to take kindly 
to its weekly bill unless a couple of alleged comedians, who dex- 
terously employed seltzer bottles and slap-sticks to secure their 
comedy effects, were on the bill. Vawdervil was in its swaddling 
clothes in those days. The people had not been "educated," as 
the gentlemen with the ponderous temples delight to say. The 
minstrel with the loudest vest scored in that period. The "side- 
walk" conversationalists who ingeniously started their act with 
the classic interrogation, "Who wuz dat peach I seen you wid de 





ROAST MEATS 

hot or cold, are given just 
that " finishing touch " if 
seasoned with 

LEA&PERRINS 

SAUCE 

THE ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 

It perfects the flavor of 
Soups, Fish, Steaks, Chops, 
Veal and Salads. It gives 
relish to an otherwise in- 
sipid dish. 

Beware of Imitations. 

John Duncan's Sons, Agts., N. Y. 



Miss 

week. 



it'/ English singer, at the Orpheum next 



other day ?" were in favor. The acrobat who turned a few mea- 
gre flings on the horizontal bars was considered a wonder. The 
monologist who reeled off pickings from Puck, while garbed in 
the traditional stage tramp's costume, was encored till the cows 
came home. The Custard Sisters, Mince and Lemon, wearing 
very pink stockings and very yellow tresses, who screeched about 
seven verses of "She Didn't Have No Mudder Tershow Her," 
in a weird falsetto, and pirouetted lamel yon their great toes, 
were considered just about the propeT caper. 

That time is not so long ago. I'm pretty far from being an 
octogenarian, and I remember it will. Tn the period of which I 
write, the dramatic sketch was given the frigid shoulder. Wise 
critics took notice, and casually made mention of the opinion 
that tabloid drama would never in- tolerated in the variety houses. 
The attitude of the audiences toward many attempted innova- 
tions seemed to clinch that conviction for a time. Vaudeville 
followers saw fit to indulge their risibilities when a serious play- 
let was proffered them. That admirable actor, Mr. Tim Murphy, 
in an excellent imitation of Sir Henry Irving as Matthias in 
"The Bells," corallcd, it is true, applause, from a certain element. 
but lie also brought on ber. The good people 

wanted not histrionism hut slapstekism. 

To repeat, that time is not so long ago. And to repeat again, 
vaudeville has been making rapid bounds. To-day the slap-stick 
for the most part hangs dustv in the property room, and seltzer 
bottles are allowed unmolested to perform their legitimate func- 
tions. Your modern vaudeville audience balks at a bill without 
the dramatic sketch, and the gallery is eager to express its ap- 
probation of the once-detested prima donna who sinirs in a for- 
eign tongue. Vaudeville audiences have been progressing, you 
see. and progressing at a lively clip. 

This fortnight, over in O'Farrell street, they are dispensing 
tragedy-opera, with the audience enjoying it. and like Oliver, 
asking for more. Serious opera, mind you. in condensed form, 
seriously put together and seriously interpreted. And the audi- 
ence gives to this number its largest measure of applause. 

It is far from a brilliant affair, this "The Patriot," the music 
of which was composed by Julian Edwards and the libretto writ- 
ten by Stanislaus Stange. But it is well worth-while, and it is a 
fine promise for the future of vaudeville. It opens up the way 
for bigger things, and gives us something of a grasp on the pos- 
sihilities of this form of theatrical entertainment. 

"The Patriot" is happy in the possession of a forthright plot 
and much stirring melody. It plays around General Washi 
who seeks shelter on a stormy night at the house of a Tory 
farmer. Manheim. With Manneim are two other Tories and a 
British spy. who plot the doing-away of Washington. A throw- 
ing of the dice makes it Manheim's lot to kill his distinguished 
guest while he sleeps. Manheim's daughter, Marion, conscious of 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 



the plot, has herself taken the room assigned to "Washington and 
given him her own. In the dark the Tory steals to his task and 
stabs his daughter. It is an excellent little story, and well, 
though elementally, developed. Miss Helena Frederick, as 
Marion, is fresh in appearance and voice, and, though the sup- 
porting company is not distinguished, it is generally capable, and 
so a most satisfactory and enjoyable number with distinctiveness 
is the result. 

In an act called "The Comstock Mystery," Miss Charlotte 
Parry shows that she is possessed of an unusual kind of abilii 
Miss Parry plays seven characters during the action of the play- 
let in rapid succession, and she is decidedly different from many 
protean artists I have known in that she is capable of changing 
Iter voice and methods with her clothes. It is an astonishing art 
in many ways, and only Mr. Reginald Parry, who officiates as a 
sort of interlocutor, jars. 

A maiden named Selma Braatz is a juggler who works with 
considerable precision and skill while toying with the regulation 
paraphernalia of the craft. While Selma takes a short intermis- 
sion her mommer, I presume it is, blows soap bubbles. 

The Three Leightons we have had here before with their "One 
Night Stand in Minstrelsy,"' and the audience seems to approve 
still of the old vehicle. George Hillman and the school-childreii 
repeat their act: Harry Armstrong and Billy Clark again give us 
ragtime and popular ballads : and the Sisters Athletas wear flesh- 
lings and a smile while showing us the value of the educated 
biceps. Also Herr Londe flirts with the possibility of a dislocated 
wish-bone — at the least — while performing his suspense-creating 
ladder trick. Praulein Tilly looks concerned and repeal- b r 
celebrated one-line speech. It all makes for real enjoyment, and 
"The Patriot" in particular makes for progress. 

* * * 

"Mrs. Temple's Telegram" Makes Merriment at the Valencia. 

It has remained for the Valencia stock company to show us 
just how good a farce "Mrs. Temple's Telegram"' really is. That it 
is a farce of the first water, and that it is quite the proper remedy 
for a soothing of the furrowed brow of care, they have been 
convincing us all week over in Valencia street. And following so 
quickly in the train -of "The Blue Mouse," a farce must be 
pretty much to the good to make us sit up and take notice. 

What this three-act affair of Frank Wyattfe is about would 
take several columns in the telling. It has mostly to do with a 
telegram which is sent by a jealous wife in order to discover the 
whereabouts of hubby on the previous evening. And that little 
piece of yellow paper causes all sorts of trouble for everybody con- 
cerned, and makes for a wonderful hodge-podge of mistaken 
identities, mix-ups. and all sorts of impossible situations gen- 
erally. It is fast and furious fun after the most approved farce 
methods, and done after the fashion of the Valencia players, it 
produces a continuous round of merriment. 

It is an astonishingly spirited performance that the actors 
give, for stock companies that have to present everything from 
romantic dramas to mellow ones often lack action when present- 
ing comedy. Paul McAllister is proving a thorough surprise, for 
be i= exhibiting that he can become the farceur quite as happily as 
the romantic heero. His Jack Temple is done in rattling style. 
Miss Grace Travers is developing rapidly, and as the Mrs. Temple 
who sends the telegram, she is a graceful success histrionically 
and sartorially. Bobert Homans contributes some unctuous 
comedy, and the resourceful Osbourne, with a wonderful make- 
up and a more wonderful manner, is a butler par excellence. His 
is the most entertaining characterization in the performance by 
all odds. Miss Peggy Monroe makes an exceedingly dainty in- 
genue, and as Mrs. Temple's sister does very good work indeed. 
Lillian Andrews and Charles Bow Clark are a screech as man 
and wife, and. in fact, there is not a genuine fiasco in the cast. 
But I wish Miss Edith Lyle wouldn't steep her voice in sacchar- 
ine. Her lusciously sticky enunciation is much more than merely 
annoying. For myself. I prefer my soothing syrup in bottles. 

* * * 
A Week of Rot at the American. 

Murray and Mack, the most atrocious Irish comedians that 
ever trod the boards, are at the American — or, rather, Mr. Mack 
is. Mr. Murray is happily among those absent, and his successor 
is perhaps a mite better than he. He couldn't be any worse. 

The show is called "A Night on Broadway" and, "of course, 
has nothing to do with its title. There are a number of special- 
ties of the tenth-rate variety, several songs of the popular brew, 



and a chorus garbed in rusty, dusty, road-worn costumes. It is 
a show for the tall timber. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

The third and final week of the "Merry Widow" will commence 
on Sunday night at the Van Ness Theatre, and it has been 
found necessary to announce a special Wednesday matinee in or- 
der to meet the demand for seats. Mabel Wilber, George Dam- 
eral, Thomas Leary, Oscar Figman are among the leading lights. 
The final performance will take place Saturday night, July 24th. 

"Polly of the Circus," the comedy-drama from the pen of 

Margaret Mayo, which ran for an entire season at the Liberty 

Theatre, New York, will be the next attraction of note at the 

Van Ness Theatre, opening there for an engagement of two 

weeks on Sunday night, July 25th. 
" * * * 

The sixth and last week of the International Grand Opera 
Company's season at the Princess Theatre will begin next Mon- 
day night. A splendid repertoire, which includes all the greatest 
triumphs of the season, will be presented. Monday evening. 
"Traviata" will be repeated, with Norelli. Zara and Bari in the 
chief roles. Tuesday evening "Aida" will be given. Madame 
Helene Therrv will be heard for the first time here in the title 
role. Wednesday matinee and Friday evening "The Barber of 
Seville" will be sung for the first times this season. Wednesday 
evening "II Trovatore" will be the programme. Thursday even- 
ing, "Fedora" will be presented, with Therry, Colombini, Arcan- 
geli and Gravina. Saturday matinee,* ''Cavalleria Rusticana" 
and "FPagliaeci" will be given by special request with picked 
casts. Saturday evening "Carmen" will be the attraction, with 
Therry, Zara, and Colombini. Sunday evening the season will 
close with a splendid production of "L'Amico Fritz." "Rigo- 
letto" will be given for the last time this Saturday night, and 

this Sunday night will be devoted to "Giaeonda." 

* * * 

"The Silver Girl" will be retained throughout the coming 
week at the Alcazar. All who have witnessed it pronounce it a 
rattling good play, and as gossip ia the best advertiser, there 
has been an increased attendance nightly since its first presenta- 
tion. The Alcazar players are very happily cast in this story 
of East and West, by Edward Peple, Louise Brownell, Bessie 
Barriscale, Claribel Becker, E. L. Bcnnison, A. Burt Wesner. 
Thurlow B*rgen, Howard Hickman, William Garwood, < Charles 
Trowbridge and Andrew Bennison being especially fitted to suit. 

"The Girl and the Judge," a Clyde Fitch comedy, will follow 
"Tin' Silver Girl," with Mr. Bergen as the Judge and Miss 

Bar-riseale as the Girl. 

* * * 

This Sunday afternoon and evening the last performance of 
that jolly farce, "Mrs. Temple's Telegram," will be given at the 
\ alehcia Theatre, and on Monday evening "Too Much John- 
son" will be staged in splendid style. As a playright, William 




I 



MS 
111! 




fill 
to 



^ 






■ YOU will buy a piano 

-%» °* us ' °* an y ma ' <e > we 

..■' 5^1 will agree to exchange 
■ I it for a Steinway at any 
1 ;3 time within three years, 
l/t \+i allowing you on the 
<^ 9 Steinway every dollar 
you have paid upon the 
other instrument. 

You'll ultimately want a 
Steinway, so you better get 
your temporary piano where 
you won't lose anything on it 
when you get ready to trade 
it in for a Steinway. 



Jpf Sherman 



flay & Go. 




STEINWAY AND OTHER PIANOS 

Victor Talking Machines 

Kearny and Sutter Streets, S. F. 

Clay, at 14th St., Oakland, Cal. 






July 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



13 



Gillette has a name to conjure with. Be it comedy or serious, 
the play that comes from his pen is sure not only to attract at- 
tention, but to hold it, and among the list of those that have 
tickled the public's risibilities "Too Much Johnson" stands well 
to the fore. The story of cool-headed Billings, Wall street 
broker, escaping from a chance entanglement with a certain 
French enchantress, taking unto himself the name of Johnson 
to hide his identity, and who gets into the hottest kind of hot 
water when he discovers that he has actually stolen the cogno- 
men of a very actual personage, is well known. Paul McAllister 
will have the congenial role of Billings, and George Osbourne, 
Charles Dow Clark, Bobert Homans, Grace Travers and Lillian 
Andrews will appear. 

"At the White Horse Tavern" will follow "Too Much John- 
son" at the Valencia Theatre. 

* * * 

The newest girl ensemble, "The Electrified Girl Keview," will 
be a chief attraction at the Orpheum next week. In addition to 
a sextette of handsome Gibson women, there will be a male Gib- 
son type of a most pronounced order impersonated by Harry Tur- 
pin. The finale of the skit shows a yacht apparently running at 
full speed in the water, with the entire company on board. The 
incidental songs and lyrics are the composition of Alfred Solman 
and Paul West. 

Lily Lena, "The Dainty Singer of Dainty Story Songs," will 
appear for the first time in this city. Her costumes are beautiful 
and varied, and she changes them at every exit. Julius Tannen, 
monologist, will be included in this week's programme. The 
Three Donals, Orpheum circuit gymnasts, who recently were the 
sensation of the Circus Busche in Vienna, will appear in feats 
of Herculean strength, and among their achievements is "the 
human bridge," in which two of the Donals grasp the wrists of 
the third while he is lying on the floor, and raises him to an up- 
right position at arms' length over his head. 

* * * 

■The American Theatre 
will inaugurate its summer 
stock season this Sunday af- 
ternoon with Otis Skinner's 
succesSj "The Duel." A 
company of capable players 
supporting Herschel Mayall 
and Miss Harriet Worthing- 
ton has been specially en- 
gaged for the season, and 
a number of high-class plays 
will be presented during the 
engagement. Support will 
be given Mr. Mayall and 
Miss Worthington in such 
players as Lillian Elliott, 
recently of Ye Liberty stock 
company; Gerald Harcourt, 
juvenile; W. L. Thorne, who 
will play characters and 
heavies; and .lames Corri- 
g.-m. the well-known charac- 
ter comedian. At the con- 
clusion of the summer stock 
the Shuberts will take pos- 
session of (he American 
Theatre and present early in September John Mason and Amelia 
Gardiner in Augustus Thomas's groat play, "The Witching 
Hour." 

"The Duel" will be presented under the personal direction of 
.Mr. Charles Swickard. 

» * » 

The New Chutes. 

The opening of the new Chutes was celebrated by an appre- 
ciative audience in a blaze of glory. It seemed as though all of 
San Francisco and Oakland were there. 

The high dive and the leap for life aroused the enthusiasm of 
rowd, as they constituted the drawing card of the free at- 
tractions. The merry crowd elbowed one the other in some- 
times vain attempts to see the hundreds of other offerings of the 
management, and it is safe to say that the grounds will be 
crowded from now on. as the evening of the 14th of July served 
merely as an attractive introduction to the coming glories of fun 
the management has to offer. 




Charles Swickard. 



French Celebration. 

The loyal French colony of San Francisco held the annual cele- 
bration of the Fall of the Bastile at the Auditorium, and the 
usual happy selection of speakers, music and dancing beguiled 
the hours away until the gray of dawn was in the sky. There are 
no better citizens in San Francisco than our cousins of France, 
and they certainly do know how to make their own and their 
kin feel that the yearly celebration is in commemoration of the 
first great step to liberate the people of the entire world from the 
thraldom of the ages. San Francisco owes much to its French 
citizenry, and all San Francisco that was not at the Chutes was 
at the Auditorium on the night of the 14th of July, making 
merry over the death of tyranny and oppression. 

"The Third Degree," acknowledged one of the hits of the past 
season in New York, will be seen here at the Van Ness Theatre 
in the near future. 



Princess Theatre 



ELLIS ST., NR. FILLMORE 
Class A Theatre. 
S. Loverich, Manager Phone West 663 

Beginning next Monday night last week of 

INTERNATIONAL GRAND OPERA COMPANY. 
Monday evening, "Traviata;" Tuesday evening, "Aida;" Wednesday matinee 
and Friday evening, "The Barber of Seville;" Wednesday evening, "II Trov- 
atore:" Thursday evening, "Fedora;" Saturday matinee, "Cavalleria Rusticana" 
and "I Pagliacci;" Saturday evening "Carmen;" Sunday evening, "L'Amico 
Fritz." 
Prices, $2, $1.50, $1, 50c. 

T/ f%l OOTi /"} ft art DfY'twO Valencia Street, between 13th and 14th 
V {A/i/fytVWU/ JL r(/fyU/OF t/ Telephone, Market 17 

This Sunday afternoon and evening. Last times of 
MRS. TEMPLE'S TELEGRAM. 
Starting Monday night 

TOO MUCH JOHNSON 

Gillette's greatest comedy, with Paul McAllister and all of the Valencia fun- 
makers. 

Next— AT THE WHITE HORSE TAVERN. 
Wednesday matinees, 25c; Saturday and Sunday matinees, 10c, 
25c, 35c, and 50c Evening prices — £5c. to $1. Seats on sales al 
the Emporium. 



New Alcazar Theatre 



Corner Sutter and Steiner Streets 
Phone W.st 1400 

Belasco & Mayer, Owners and Managers. Absolutely Class A Bldg 
Monday evening and all next week, a play of East and West 

THE SILVER GIRL 

By Edward Peple, author or "The Prince Chap." 

Prices — Nights. 25c to $1. Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 25c. 
to 50c. 

A / yVl DW^Ofl W r / 1 h On1'y*0 Markct s,nesrSeven,n Phone Market 381 
iXflbts! l/t/lA/f(/ J. t VX5\AjV I Ts The playhouse of comfort and safely 

Inauguration of the SUMMcR STOCK SEASON, commencing Sunday matinee 
JulyiS. OTIS SKINNER'S GREAT SUCCESS 

THE DUEL 

Herschel Mayall. Harriett Worthington. James Corrtgan, Lillian Elliott. Gerold 
Harcourt and Charles Swickard. 

Special summer prices — Evenings. »5C 50c. 75c. Matinees 25c and 50c. ALL 
RESERVED. 

New Orpheum gM-«- «,**,. 

Safest and Mosl Magnificent Theatre in America. 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 
ARTISTIC VAUOEVILLE 

LILY LENA the daintv English Singer of Dainty Story Songs; Chas. Dana; 
■ Gibson's Electrified Girl Review; Julius Tannen; ;-Dona1s-i: Charlotte Parry 

& Co.; 5-Leightons-v. Selma Braatz; New Orpheum Motion Pictures; Las' week 

great artistic triumph Helena Fredericks in the one art grand opera "The 

Patriot.'" 
Evening prices. 10c. 25c. 50c, 75c Box seats, |1. Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays). 10c. 25c, 60c PHONE DOUG- 
LAS 70. 



Van Ness Theatre 



CORNER VAN NBS9 AVE 

AND GROVE STREET. 

Phont Market 500 

Beginning Sunday night. July iSth. Third and final week. Extra Matinee 
Wednesday. Regular matinee Saturday. Last time Saturday night July 24. 
Henry W. Savage's New York production of 

THE MERRY WIDOW. 
Music by Franz Lehar. 
Sunday night July 95th— the comedy drama success. POLLY OF THE CIRCUS 



New Chutes ™™<*-™y 



Turk «nd Webtfer 



SAN FRANCISCO S FAVORITE PLAYGROUND _ __ 

Exerv afternoon and every night. THOUSANDS TURNED AWAY AT THE 
OPENING. Wonderful open air attraction 

ROYAL BANDA ROMA. 
LeJ S-* the Gvmnastlc Sirlgnano: Desperado, the man who flirts with death: 
Demon, in a ride through fire: Florence Spray, the dainty diver in the white 
tights. Elegantly fitted cafe and grill and a'.lhousand other diversions. 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 




tf. 



The Examiner had a marvelous sensation on Wednesday morn- 
ing. The fact that Miss Jennie Crocker's pearls were really not 
lost was "done into print" — a French print at that. I am sur- 
prised that the other papers did not have the scoop— "done into 
Spanish or Russian." It was really clever of the Examiner 
society editor to use Anglo-French in telling the tale, for the 
ingrowing nouns, inverted verbs, and the antics of the adjectives 
livened up a story that has been told in fair English several times 
in the News Letter. At least two months ago the readert of this 
column knew that the pearls had only been mislaid, and were 
coiled in Mrs. Walter Martin's jewel box, while innocent waiters 
were put through the third degree. A week or two ago we dis- 
cussed the fact that Miss Crocker had worn the necklace in Seat- 
tle. The psychological moment has arrived to vinegar the pearl 
story, and let the affair dissolve into infinite space. Miss Crocker 
naturally has a rush of fatigue to the head whenever the subject 
is mentioned. Mrs. Walter" Martin is not keen about having it 
warmed over for meals, for, though Miss Crocker herself thought- 
lessly dropped the necklace into the wrong box, Mrs. Martin does 
not enjoy being dragged by the heels into the affair. Exclama- 
tions on the subject are bent double like an overworked hair pin. 
One interrogation, alone, has a period to stand on. What recom- 
pense, if any, did Miss Crocker make to the men who were pub- 
licly accused of the theft? As for the rest : 

Dribble — dribble — trickle — trickle — 

What a lot of raw dust ! 
Mv doilie's had an accident. 

And out came all the saw-dust ! 

A delicate situation- in Burlingame has made the word purists 
wish that our vocabulary were all elastic and a yard wide. Com- 
mon parlance has stretched the word "affinity" to cover cases 
that are as far-fetched as any charade on the word could be. 
The newspapers keep the expression set up in type, and whenever 
there is a space to be filled, they chuck it in. In the argot of 
the hour, there is no word like affinity. But the friend who 
unfolded the affair at Burlingame and spread it out for my delec- 
tation has a choice regard for the niceties of expression and ob- 
jected to "affinity." "Every one supposes that there will be a 
divorce," she said, "and until a few weeks ago it was predicted 
that a stunning young divorcee would soon thereafter undertake 
to fill the defunct place. The wife, whose divorce action is ex- 
pected, is not the sort of woman who sprinkles every veranda 
with her confidences, so all the speculation on the subject is 
circumstantial evidence. However, the hushand's attentions else- 
where do act as tonic to the report. But now another woman has 
entered the affair — and like the divorcee she is a society woman 
of good standing — and not hard to look at ! In fact, the wife 
and both of the other women would have to be included in any 
complete list of beauties hereabout. Fancy the confusion of the 
gossips now that it is not a clear case of devotion to one woman — 
for he balances his attentions as cleverly as a juggler. It is 
impossible to sav a man has two 'affinities,' and yet how shall I 
put it?" 
_ I suggested to her, and my suggestion met with instant appre- 
ciation, that it might be said that the man has an "affinity and 
an alternate." The word "alternate" seems to plug up a hole 
that has been rent in our vocabulary by the modern exigencies 
of life. Now, what Burlingame wants to know is, after the ex- 
pected divorce, who will win the discarded husband, the "affinity" 
or her "alternate?" 

Miss Elsa Draper is in town almost every day busily purchas- 
ing things at the shops, which hints that her marriage will not 
wait until the curtain call for winter. Miss Draper is one of 
the girls who had permitted herself to grow blase before the end 
of a first season, but these days she is dimpling with interest in 
life, and also she is be-orchided. Her lieutenant has evidently 
left an order at the florist's which includes fresh orchids daily. 

On Monday an "army" wedding kept the bells from getting 



^ 



FAIRMONT HOTEL 

Maintaining the world's standard of 
Hotel excellence established in the 
old Palace Hotel by the present 
management. 

Under the management of 

.Palace Hotel Company . 



out of tune. Miss Marjorie Brown and Lieutenant John George 
Hotz, TJ. S. A., were married at the pretty home of the bride's 
parents on Green street, but though it was a house wedding, the 
groom's brother officers were in full regalia of gold' lace and brass 
buttons, and the scene was distinctly pretty, with the fascinating 
bride peopling the perspective and the military groom and his 
fellows illuminating the picture. 

Tuesday was also braided in gold lace — as indeed it is every 
week by the Army and Navy Club on California street. Tuesday 
is "Ladies' Day," and one Tuesday tea and chatter-chatter are 
served and the next an informal dance is given by the hospitable 
sers ire men. 

Theatre parties lit' been the only stimulant used to any ex- 
tent during the week. Every one wants to see the "Merry Widow," 
and to lisl the number of parties that have gone together would 
be to run the name of almost every one in society. But there 
was one box party that stood out from the rest, and all because 
one of the young women, a debutante of last season, wore a con- 
ventional decollete ball gown instead of the slightly low neck 
corsage affected for the theatre. The fact that there was a young 
Episcopalian prelate -in the party accented her costume. 

The Chautauquans are assembled at Pacific Grove for their 
rear-end feast of wisdom and general gain along educational 
lines. Pacific Grove Chautauqua Assembly opened on the even- 
ing of the 8th, with a large attendance, which has steadily in- 
creased to the usual if not larger attendance than heretofore. 
The President, Dr. Evans, of San Francisco, presided at the first 
night concert, and San Francisco vocal talent, Mrs. Robert Bees, 
the well-known lyric soprano, and the Golden Gate Quartette, 
assisted by Mrs. Cora F. Pike, a Boston contralto, gave a pro- 
gramme, which met with the approval of every one present. 

Francis Klein, one of. the best known hotel men of San Fran- 
cisco for many years, and at present proprietor of the Steptoe 
Hotel of Ely, Nevada, is at the St. Francis with Mrs. Klein. 

Among the recent arrivals from the interior towns of the 
State now at the Fairmont are Mrs. Frank Short, Fresno; Mrs. 
W. W. Craycroft, Fresno: Dr. James Martin and Al. Darrow, 
Sacramento: Lee Gray, Fresno; Senator J. B. Curtin, Sonora, 
i lalifornia. 

Bev. J. Wilmer Gresham, Trinity's rector at San Jose, with his 
family are located in a cottage at Pacific Grove for the month. 
Rev. If. H. Powell is supplying the church of St. Mary's pulpit 
at the present time. 

Mrs. Frederick Cox and the Misses Cox, of Saciramento, are 
at the Fairmont while in the city. 



An Ideal Auto Control Station 

THE VENDOME, San Jose 

Here are a few delightful trips: 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

Mount Hamilton 

Monterey 

Santa Clara Valley 

Mission San Jose 

Santa Cruz 

Our Garage at your service. The Vendome offers 
every comfort for week end visitors. 

H. W. LAKE, Mgr. 



July 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



IS 



California has certainly done herself proud within the last 
few weeks. First she produced Miss Bogue as the most beautiful 
woman in the whole .State whose picture will be emblematical 
of the Portola festivities in October next. Then came Miss Ed- 
wanls. the most perfectly formed girl under twelve in the whole 
world (as decided by the Physical Culture Society of New 
York), and lastly the prize of a young Calif ornian, Hamilton 
Vose Bryan, who has just entered the Naval Academy at An- 
napolis, and is now a midshipman. 

His late grandfather, Captain William J. Bryan (well known 
as a pioneer arid in marine circles) was instrumental in securing 
the appointment for his grandson. The father of this creditable 
young man is William V. Bryan, of the real estate firm of Wm. 
V. Bryan & Co., prominently identified with Masonic institu- 
tions, and who afforded his son the necessary preliminary educa- 
tion to attain the brilliant result he has just accomplished. Au 
extract from his letter of July 7th to his father will, prove of 
some interest, especially as he had the distinguished honor of 
passing both his physical and mental examinations at Annapo- 
lis as "number one" out of a class of six hundred applicants 
from all over the United States. That makes the third prize 
for California. The extract follows : 

"By degrees I got into the routine. When 1 first entered I 
received my full outfit, and it took about three hours to arrange 
it according to regulations. The bed, which I have to make 
after breakfast, looks like a marble slab — all corners sharp and 
straight, but it's inviting. The rooms must be swept clean at 
6 :45 a. m., and made dirt-proof against the white gloves of 
the inspecting officer. Beveille is at 6 :30, breakfast 7 :05, drill 
8:00, seamanship drill 10:00, dinner 12:55, steam engineer- 
ing 3:00, supper 6:55; gymnasium 8; tattoo 9:30; taps 10:00. 

"We wear white uniforms until September. In the physical 
test I made 6234 out of a standard of 6010 on the machines 
which register every muscle. 

"Recreation Hall is a novelty, where navy songs are sung, 
and the fellows certainly enjoy themselves. The foot-ball fever 
is here, and is almost uncontrollable. Each of us midshipmen 
have hot and cold shower baths, adjacent to our rooms. I tell 
you it's fine after a hard drill. Isn't it fine thai 1 passed such 
a mathematical examination: Geometry 100, algebra 85, arith- 
metic 92. This was the biggest mark made. 1 thought I had 
done well, but never realized it was the best. I was 97 in his- 
tory, and over 80 in all other studies, so you may be interested 
to know that my marks in mathematics were not only the high- 
est in the June examinations, but higher than any candidate 
who took the April examinations. This was oul of six hundred 
fellows, and bright ones, too. [ smell 'taps' no! Ear off, so 
au revoir." 

* * * 

Some of the polo enthusiasts who make th ii headquarters at 
ilu' St. Francis will endeavor to bring oul West the Meadow- 
brook team lhal has just won back the American trophy from 
England. It is the opinion of man] thai oui b -. who 

appear to such advanti I the Rarelafl - would make 

the Meadowbrook team struggle retain its laurels. A 

match may be arranged to take place mar Burling;! 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Gough Streets 

A comfortable, hig-h order, uptown hotel, now under the manage- 
ment of THOMAS H. SHEDDEN, formerly manager of St- 
Duncan's 



Hotel Westminster 



Los Angeles, Cal. 

Fourth «od Mwn Su 



American Plan 



REOPENED 



Rates per Day. $2.50 Rooms without Bath. 
Rooms with Bath. »3.00. $3.50 and $4.00. 



European Plan 

11.00 per day and up 
With bath. $1.50 and up 



F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Jefferson Kirk have announced the mar- 
riage of their daughter Imogene to Mr. William Robinson Moli- 
nard, on Sunday, the 87th of June, L909, at Buffalo, New Vorl.. 
(Continued to Page t6.) 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

APACE -WITH SCIENCE 



■WHATEVER COMFORT IS KNOWN 

TO ANY TRAVELER -IS AT THE 

COMMAND OF EVERY GUEST. 



HOTEL VICTORIA 

N. E. cor. Bush and Stockton 

Centrally Located 

A Modern and Up-To-Date Family Hotel. 
Sun in Every Room. Elaborate Furnish- 
ings. Excellent Cuisine. Large Lobby and 
Reception Room. Grill Room. Dining Room 

MRS. W. F. MORMS, Proprietor, formerly of Hotel Cecil, 
Bush Street, San Francisco 

European and American Plan 



Hotel Rafael 



San Rafael, Cal. 



Under the management of J. H. HOLMES 

formerly of Hotel Green. Pasadena 



Buy tickets and check baggage direct to San Rafael. 
Special attention given to Touring parties. 



Hotel Del Monte 

Invites you to come and 

PLAY GOLF 



on the finest 18-hole golf course in the 'West. 
within five minutes walk of the Hotel. 

H. R. WARNER. Manager. 



THE PENINSULA 

The big. flrsVclass hotel that is only half an hour's ride from 
San Francisco. 

THE PENINSULA 

The leading suburban hotel of central California, with the 
splendid reputation for service, table and general conditions. 

THE PENINSULA 

The hotel with ail the comforts that the moS fastidious could 
desire. Special rates in the bachelors' quarters. 

JAS. H. DOOLITTLE. Manager, San Mateo, Cal. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 




(Continued front Page 15.) 

Mr. and Mrs. P. Calvin Ford, New York City; Mrs. J. Busse, 
Miss Clara A. Busse and Miss Gertrude Ryan, of Chicago; Mr. 
and Mrs. N. Engeil De Reeves, Baltimore, Md.; Mrs. Vail 
Brainard, Lyndonville, Vt. ; Mrs. A. B. Lounsbury, New York; 
Benjamin C. Hennebery and Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Weller, of 
Pensacola, Fla.; F. L. Garrison, Philadelphia; Mr. and Mrs. T. 
A. Sperry and family, New York, are among the recent arrivals 
at the Fairmont. 

J. Friedlander, a prominent banker of San Francisco, with his 
wife, spent a few days at Hotel Rafael. 

Thomas Bonynge, of Sydney, New South Wales, and W. A. 
Bonynge, of Los Angeles, lunched at Del Monte on the 9th. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Brook and family, from San Jose, and 
Miss Mattie L. Jodon from Pasadena, who is on her way to the 
Alaska- Yukon Exposition, registered at the Hotel Rafael this 
week. 

Among the San Franciscans enjoying the more lively sport of 
horseback riding is Miss Helen Heeht, Miss Dorothy Fries and 
Miss Amy Dinkelspiel ; after a three hours' ride in the morning, 
one finds them hard at work on the tennis courts in the after- 
noon. 

A party of distinguished foreigners from Argentine Republic 
arrived at the Fairmont the past week. It is composed of Mr. 
and Mrs. Latham Hall and 0. W. Thomas, of Rosario, and they 
are en route to the Seattle Exposition. The Halls were joined 
here by A. S. Hall, of Colorado Springs. 

Miss Pillans, of England, is spending the summer at Del 
Monte. She is an enthusiastic sportswoman, making a round of 
the eighteen-hole links, practicing golf strokes besides, and 
bowling in the green daily. She is also a keen lawn-tennis 
player, and won the ladies' championship of the Casa Blanca 
Lawn Tennis Club at Riverside in the spring, defeating Mrs. 
Harry Kearne, the holder. 

The Chamber of Commerce, Merchants' Exchange and Mer- 
chants' Association have arranged for the joint entertainment 
of the House Naval Committee and members of the Ways and 
Means Committee, who will arrive at the Hotel St. Francis 
about August 22d, en route to Honolulu. The Congressmen 
and their wives, forming a party of about fifty, will be enter- 
tained on a lavish scale during their two days' stay, and will 
then proceed to Hawaii, where they will be guests of the Hono- 
lulu Commercial organizations. 

Leon S. Greenebaum, A. Meertief and A. M. Rosenbaum 
came down to Del Monte by the "husbands' train" on Saturday 
evening, and rejoined the partners of their joys. 

Recent arrivals at the Hotel Victoria are Mr. and Mrs. Bran- 
der, Miss Maud O'Connor, Dr. David Powell and family of 
Marysville, Count and Countess St. Dr. Seine of Paris, A. E. 
Gillespie, Mr. 0. Y. Woodward and family of Woodward Island, 
Mrs. M. J. Hyde and son, Dr. L. D. Hyde, Mrs. and the Misses 
Warner of Del Monte, Mrs. Alfred Harrell and daughter Ber- 
nice of Bakersfield. 

The following were guests at a dinner party at Hotel Del 
Monte on Monday night, July 5th : J. N. Pickering, U. S. A. ; 
Miss Rupe, of New York; Mr. and Mrs. Mel. Porter, Thomas 
Kennedy, Miss Hazel Holt, Mr. and Mrs. W..H. Merrill and Miss 
Leah Cox, of Monterey. 

There are now one hundred people at Castle Crags. Mrs. W. 
F. Morris, the proprietor of the Victoria Hotel,- who is also the 
manager of Castle Crags, visits there every Saturday until Mon- 
day in the interests of the guests. Mrs. Morris was manager of 
the Hotel Cecil on Bush street, before the fire. The Hotel Vic- 
toria, under her guidance, promises to be one of the most popu- 
lar hotels in the citv this winter. 



Try Murine Eye Remedy 
For Red. Weak^ Weary, Watery Eyes. Granulated Eyelids and Pink 
SSL ^ U S£ e Doesn't Smart. Soothes Eye Pain. Compounded by Ex- 
perienced Physicians; Contains no Injurious or Prohibited Drugs T?y 
Murine for Tour Eye Troubles. You Will Like Murine. Try It in BabVs 
Eyes for Scaly Eyelids. All Druggists Sell Murine at 60c V 

MARK LANE, Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds 245 Bush 
Street. Phone Temp. 2629, 



\ 




CURES 

•HEADACHES 

lOtaS*. 50* X*I°P Bottles* 



\ 



MANZANITA HALL 

A School for Boys, Palo Alto, Cal. 
-Will give your boy a thorough preparation for college, while 
training him to be strong, self-reliant and manly. Special attention 
given to preparation for Stanford. Absence of rigid, classification 
permits rapid advancement. Ample facilities for athletic sports. 
Write for illustrated catalogue. 

W. A. SHEDD, HEAD MASTER. 



Miss Head's School 

2638 CHANN1NG 'WAY, BERKELEY, CAL. 
Boarding and day school for girls, accredited to the University of 
California, Stanford, Vassar, Smith and Wellesley; 22nd year 
begins AuguSt 9, 1909. 

MARY E. WILSON, M. L., PRINCIPAL 



Miss Harker's School 

Palo Alto, California 

Boarding and day school for girls. Certificate admits to college. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Special attention given 
to music, arts and crafts. Catalogue upon application. Eighth 
year begins August 16, 1909. 



A. W. Best 



Alice Best 



Best's Art School 



1628 Bush Street 



Life Classes 
Day and Night 



Illustrating 
Sketching 
Painting 




PEPSIN 

GUM 



SUPERIOR TO ALL 



.Iui.y 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



it 




The Beverend Charles. Wagner — and the name spells nothing 
at all to the reader unless it is coupled with some past misdeed 
or achievement — is at it again. The last time he broke into 
print he hit upon the psychological moment, and his "The Sim- 
ple Life" was a glowing success, financially. He had struck a 
responsive chord in a period when the public was ready and will- 
ing to swallow the gilded and sugar plated platitude, and gorge 
upon it. Wagner had not yet developed, however, and had he, 
he would have blossomed into a Pra Elbertus on the spur of 
the jingling guinea that quickly lined his purse, as a result of 
the sporadic foray in the field of advisory literature. It was a 
sort of pink pellet for pale people, and the lining was filled with 
truths self-evident and easily culled, without' the help of the 
Wagner man or any other militant propagandist of the cult of 
the Great Outdoors. 

The Reverend Charles Wagner's latest effort is "The Home of 
the Soul," and is published by Funk & Wagnalls. The cover 
page in gray paper, over the glad gilt cloth, gives his name and 
trade, and there is a reminder that he is the author of "The Sim- 
ple Life." This book has an introductory of platitudes by the 
Eeverend Lyman Abbott, and the rest of the book is flat and 
stale, and will command no attention, except from the very, 
very good, and the unco' religious. 

* * * 

"The Friends of the Hunted" is a book whitten by John How- 
ard Jewett, and it strikes one at first glance as a pretty fair 
imitation of lots of other books dealing with the lives of animals. 
This similarity extends to the make-up of pages and illustrations. 
The illustrations smatter of the Thompson-Seton style, and the 
text is a combination between Joel Chandler Harris and Thomp- 
son-Seton and others. It is frankly imaginative, and the habits 
of the animals depicted are vaguely exaggerated, and smatter of 
the fairyland tale. 

The publisher says that this is "a bonk every boytvill enjoy." 
It would be better to leave it to the boy, and if he's little more 
than an infant he will spurn the idea of enjoyment from such 
improbable and foolish hodge-podge. As a sophorific agent for 
the two year old, who refuses to go to sleep, it is sui 
success claimed by the publisher. 

Dodge Publishing Co., New York. 

* * * 

"The Journal of a Neglected Wile" is a new book b] Mabel 
Herbert Uruer, and it is from the presses of the Dodge Publish- 
ing Company, New York. The Reviewer just glanced through 
its pages, and as he hates the epistolary style, he turned it over 
to a woman friend to read, not to review. In returning the book 
the friend had tins to say : 

"My indignation wells up that the conditions of out 
system make a woman so dependent upon the attitude of one 
man. 

"That she is so absolutely lacking in backbone, that she can- 
not scratch lu~ eyes out, draw and quarter the other woman, 
commit suicide in a decent and dignified maimer, or. best of all, 
p and make some other man take an into rest u ter, is mad- 
• l!n Journal of a I Wife' mala "1 boil 

al « hat I 31 admit is the supini ness of on - - En 

3 particular woman — if she only had had a bust; 
profession." 

If a book is of such calibre as to raise such a howl from a 
woman who is usually and decent disposition, it must 

have stun, value as a developer of circulation, tndigi 
stimulant of the cardiac canals and nerves. I cannot speak 
personal knoi E the book, hut 1 commend tl 

made one woman "as mad as a hat: 



"Iani n a -' ame " ' 

per at :h< 
there than they would be roaming the African jnngli - 
ingtvti Star. 






Choose Your Oil As 
You Would Your Car 

Imperfect lubrication causes more 
trouble, more expense, more break- 
downs than anything else about your 
car. There'll be no carbon deposit 
to foul the cylinders and spark-plugs, 
no friction, no oil-troubles if you get 

ZERDLENE 

Auto-Lubricating Oil 

You can count on perfect lubrication at 
all times, under all conditions, entire free- 
dom from trouble with carbon deposits, 
and increased power from your engine. 

Zerolene is made in one grade only, for all types of 
cylinders and bearings. Produced in only one place 
in the world. Put up in sealed cans with patent 
spout that cannot be refilled. Also in barrels for 
garage trade. Sold bv dealers everywhere. Write 
for booklet, "21,000 Miles with Zerolene," Free. 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY 

(Incorporated) 



WHY? 



Ask the man who sold you your ready-made shirts 
why he had those for his personal use made to 
order 



WHY? 



D. C. HEGER, 243 Kearny St., San Francisco 

Shirts and Underwear to Order Phone Douglas 3641 



Witter Springs Hotel 

The Automobile Headquarters of Lake County 
The most delightful place to rest and get well. Every 
comfort; large, airy rooms, with hot and cold water; 
private baths. 



WITTER SPRINGS WATER WORKS WONDERS 
For people afflicted with Stomach, Liver or 
Kidney Troubles. Absolutely cures Eczema 

Address Peck-Judah Information Bureaus, or reser. 
vations can be made at City Office. Westbank Building, 
630 Market Street 



Union Lumber Company 

Redwood and Pine Lumber 

Redwood Ties. Telegraph Poles, Shinsrles. Split Shakes. Etc. 

Main Office — Crocker Bide.. San Francisco 

Yards and Planing Mills— Sixth and Channel Sts.. San Francisco 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA, Market and Sansome 

streets. Branches. 624 Van Ness avenue and 3039 Sixteenth St. For the 

half year ending June 30. 1909. a dividend has been declared on deposits in 

hits department of this bank at the rate of four (4) per cent per 

annum, free of ail taxes, payable on and after Thursday. July I 

is not called for are added to and bear the same rate of interest 
as the principal from July 1. 1909. 

E. O. TOGNAZZI. Manager. 



18 



!«* 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 




"Walter J. Bartnett, among the many 
It is to Laugh. practical and afterward successful 

schemes for the development of 
California, evolved the idea of utilizing the waters of Clear Lake 
and the adjacent water-shed, and by building a dam at its lower 
extremity bring them into use for man as power producers or as 
a pure drinking fluid. He was quite successful in convincing 
hard-headed business men of this fact, and was in a fair way to 
make his ideas practical working successes when along came the 
failure of the California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. With 
the fall of the bank he became entangled and, failing to find 
satisfaction in one victim of its wrath, the public, aided by 
the superficial daily press, looked about and pounced upon Bart- 
nett. The principal accusation made was a vague and terrible 
one. It was to the effect that he was a "mere dreamer." Bart- 
nett may not even claim the poor privilege of being the first 
man who has been immolated by the frock-coated gentry on the 
spike called "a dreamer." Dreams are the things true greatness 
springs from, not only in the financial world but in every-day 
business. ■ Time tells us, in the awakening, if the dreams were 
nightmares ! 

Bartnetfs dreams have proven something more than dreams. 
Instead of giving up in despair, when circumstances and the man 
rose up to overawe and overcome him, instead of sitting with 
folded hands, bewailing his fate, believing in himself and in his 
"dreams," he went forth to conquer the incredulous opinionated 
capitalist, and to all appearances he has conquered. His argu- 
ments alone would not have been valid had not time stepped in 
and made of his "dreams" tangible real profit-making values. 
First, the Western Pacific investments came as a solace to the 
stock-holders of the bank and to its depositors. Next, other of 
the institutions of the Treadwells showed strength and income- 
producing capacity, and with the loosening up of money in the 
East came the cap-sheaf. Eastern and English capitalists, choos- 
ing to ignore Bartnett, the bank and its depositors and stock- 
holders, have placed an unwilling seal of approval on the Clear 
Lake Water Company's "dream." Millions in London and New 
York money are to be made available to carry on the original 
ideas of Bartnett. Note the irony of it all. The daily papers, 
notably the Call, announced that the scheme was now taken up 
by "practical men," and that the reason why Bartnett did not 
successfully carry through the grand scheme was that he is "a 
dreamer." Columbus, Galileo. Morse, Edison, Goodyear, Ful- 
ton, Seward and a million others were all dreamers, and Bartnett 
is in good company. 



The New Law 
and the Banes 



Commissioner Alden Anderson is 
actively engaged in answering quer- 
ies regarding the operation of the 
new banking law. The California 
law is so similar in operation to the national law that the work 
will be rendered more easy, as it will make available information 
in the hands of the deputy comptrollers. Mr. Anderson is 
quoted as saying that he will issue temporary certificates in place 
of the old licenses, until such time as new licenses are ready, 
which will be when the banks have been passed upon as to their 
condition. The new law makes an additional amount of clerk 
work necessary, for it calls for specific information as to capi- 
talization. Departmental banks must keep their books in differ- 
ent departments separate, and this regulation applies as well to 
securities and money. An apportionment will be made of capi- 
tal stock and surplus, according to their various departments. 



The eyes of investors, not specula- 
Hareiman and Oil. tors, mind you, are turned toward 

oil. The various California fields 
have shown steadiness of production that is not diminished by 
time, and gradually the tyro and the wild-catter or the specula- 
tor has been eliminated from the various fields. It is now known 
to a dot what the value of land in the Coalinga proven district or 
in the producing district of any other field, is worth. We know 



that this or that acreage, undeveloped, because of its contiguity 
to producers or because it is surrounded by such, is worth from 
two to five thousand dollars an acre. The regularly established 
companies in the various California fields are permanent divi- 
dend producers. They are investment opportunities. 

The Associated Oil Company is one of the strong dominant 
factors in the oil business in the West, and the action of the 
Harriman interests in cancelling or not renewing contracts with 
the Standard Oil Company, is an evidence that the little king of 
the railroad world is to still farther enlarge his scope of activities. 
Last week it was announced that the Associated had closed con- 
tracts that called for more than $500,000 a year with the Harri- 
man interests, and that this consumption of oil was for the 
Columbia river steamers and for the passenger locomotives on 
both the Southern Pacific and the O. B. & N. The rumor is, 
that the Associated is to be actively subsidized by the Southern 
Pacific Company from now on. 



Oil is King. 



It is stated on the best authority 
that the Union Oil Company has 
closed a foreign contract calling for 
10,000 barrels of fuel oil a day. It is thought that. the making of 
this contract caused the Union Oil Company to order the two 
large tank steamers now on their way to this country from 
England. 



A report by F. L. Ransome on the 
Round Mountain Gold, gold ores of Round Mountain, Nev., 

a town in Nye County, is included 
in the Geological Survey's Bulletin 380, entitled "Contributions 
to economic geology, 1908, Part I." The town is named from a 
small oval hill on the east side of Big Smoky Valley, at the base 
of the Toquina Range. The ore, which lies in rhyolite, is all 
oxidized, and carries from $10 to $15 in gold to the ton. It is 
widely distributed and is developed at several mines, by hydraulic 
methods. Mr. Ransome's report is contained in an advance 
chapter of Bulletin 380, known as Bulletin 380-A, which may be 
had on application to the Director of the Survey at Washing- 
ton. 



Incredible Value of 
Nevada County Ore. 



The reports of the almost incredible 
value of the ore taken from the Six- 
teen to One mine in the Alleghany 
district, have focussed the attention 
of the mining world upon this limited area in Nevada County. 
Manager E. H. Wilson, one of the owners of the new Eldorado, 
declares the tests give $140,000 as the value of the last 25 sacks 

HIGH GRADE INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

LIST ON REQUEST 

SlltrO & Co., Brokers 



■412 Montgomery St., San Francisco 



Established 1868 



Private Wire Chicago — New York. 

J. C. WILSON 

f New York Stock Exchange 
Member \ Chicago Board of Trade 

(. Stock and Bond Exchange, S. F. 
Local and Eastern Stocks and Bonds 



Main Office 

Mills Bide. 

Tel. Kearny 482 



Branch Office 
Hotel Alexandria 
Lob Angeles 



FRANK P. MEDINA, ATTORNEY AT LAW 

-of Medina and Griffin. Dissolved, remains at the old address. 812-814 
Claus Spreckels Bide. Patents, Trade Marks, Copyriehts, Patent Liti- 
gation. MANY YEARS EXPERIENCE WITH PATENT OFFICE EXAMINERS. 



Vanderbilt Estates Company 

Gilt Edge Realty Bonds First Mortgage 

Apply 

REALTY EXCHANGE, 1047 PHELAN BUILDING, San Francisco, Cal. 
Home Office— New York City 



July 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



19 



of ore taken from the chute at a point 300 feet in the tunnel. So 
far, $?65,000 in gold has been the result of loss than a month's 
exploitation of the property by ten men. 
The discoveries are causing a rash ol prospectors to the scene. 

and it may be possible that the long-looked-for "Mother Lode" 
of the gold-producing region of Nevada County has been un- 
earthed. Such a find is "in the cards," according to experts, 
and as of late years the "good things" are mining California- 
wards, it is to be hoped that a boom in gold production is among 
the arrivals. 



The Tao and 
Independence. 



The cornerstone of the Philippine 
capitol building was laid on May 
20th in Manila with appropriate 
ceremonies. President Sergio Os- 
mena, of the Assembly, seconded by numerous Assemblymen, 
improved the occasion by discerning in the laying of the corner- 
stone the first real step towards absolute independence. Vioe- 
Governor W. Cameron Forbes made an address notable for its 
absence of reference to "independencia" in the near future. 
Sergio Osmena is a rich man, a prosperous lawyer of Cebu, and 
a representative of the ruling ciass who dream by night and day 
of a Eepublic patterned after Ecuador or Venezuela. It is this 
class who desire independence, not the poor, hardworking tao, 
who to-day for the first time in. Philippine history is relieved 
from the necessity of contributing half his meagre earnings to 
some grasping ecclesiastical, political, or commercial ''higher up." 



The State Mining Bureau has recently issued maps of 

El Dorado and Placer Counties, upon which are indicated the 
National Forest boundaries. These maps are very useful to the 
miner, stockmen, lumbermen and others, who are brought in 
contact with the forest service. In addition to the maps of' 
these counties, State Mineralogist Aubury has prepared and is- 
sued maps of Siskiyou, Shasta, Tuolumne and Sierra Counties. 
Map of Trinity County will soon be issued, and a large, up-to- 
date State map, which will show the boundaries of the national 
forests, national and State park and national monuments. As 
the funds will permit, the Bureau will issue maps of all the re- 
maining mining counties. The maps can be obtained from the 
Librarian of the Bureau in the Ferry Building, San Francisco, 
for 20 cents and 2 cents additional for postage, 

Eric C. W. S. Lyders, Chief of the Field Division, and 

Wm. R. Jewell, Mineral Land Uxaminer of the United States 
(ieneral Land Office, are now in this city, as a result of the de- 
cision of the General Land Office to suspend action on (lie peti- 
tion of the Southern Pacific Company Eoi certain lands lying be- 
iwern Mohave and The Needles, until such time as an investi- 
gation can be made by the special agents mentioned. This 
would indicate thai the work of the Chamber of Mines and the 
expenditures made by it in connection with ill ion of 

the monster petition which was forwarded to Washington were 
not in vain. 

In this connection, attention is invited i<> the fad that even 
courtesy should be shown, and all facilities afforded the ■ 
agents of the Land Office in making their investigation, and min- 
ing men are requested to ^' t into communication with the Cham- 
Iht hi Mines, in order thai Messrs. Lyders ami Jewel] may be 

advised at an earlv date as to the facilities which will 

litem in this connection. L IS anticipated thai Mr. Jewel] will 

start on his iio. ' within the nexl three weeks. 



The Chamber of Mine-. Los Angeles, now has on hand 

and available about one hundred slides and 'rem which 

the Pn will make • for the first of 

the series of lectures on the mining and oil industries of the 
Southwest. The Chamber is also in correspondence with several 
of the mining districts in regard to furnishing additional slides. 
negatives and photographs, and icipated that the first 

ile interest to mining and oil men. 



Wot Hi* Fault. 

The ! s arc horn, not made. The Girl — I know, 

wasn't blaming you." />'■ ri ! inscript. 



THE NATURAL FLAVOR 



of Ihe richest and pur.- ik Is retained In Borden's Peerless 

Brand Evaporated Milk t unsweetened.) It is especially adapted for use 
cither plain or diluted on breakfast fruits or cereals. In coffee and 
chocolate It la much better than fresh cream. It enriches all milk dishes. 



Surprise Suction Sweeper 

Patented Feb. 4. 1908 

Price $12.50. Operated by hand. Large sale Easl. No exertion. No 
fatigue. Can be operated by a child. Is portable. Weighs only S lbs. 
Does the work of Eledric Sweeper at no cotft for operation. By express 
prepaid. Ju& introduced Wesft. Agents wanted in Washington, Oregon, 
California, Montana, Idaho, Utah, Nevada, Arizona. New Mexico, Colo- 
rado, Wyoming. Send for Advertising Matter. 

Pacific Utilities Company 

Monadnock Building, San Francisco 

Controlling Exclusive Rights for Above Mentioned 
States and Territories. 



Branch Office, 542 So. Spring 
Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 





New 

Poodle 

Dog 

Restaurant 

and 

Hotel 



N. W. Corner 
Polk & Post StS. 
San Francisco 

Phone 

Franklin 2960 



For Oysters 
Moraghan's Restaurant 

26 Ellis Street 

Music during dinner. Open Sundays. 







>jr'SC ) P ■ /M '- 




\ ^ i ^ 


(&JkLJiantilCu<z> 


*m:i>mmri.-iiimM^^ 




nB! ife 


The Leading Restaurant 




b AbIu 


of San Francisco 

REGULAR DINNER $1.25 
or A la Carte 

342 Sutter Street San Francisco 







MAISON DOREE HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

151 157 ELLIS STREET. ABOVE POWELL. Ip-to-date Establishment 
Lunch with wine 75c. Dinner with wine $1.25. Music every evening. 

Phone Ex. Douglas I04O connecting all apanmrnts 
Emile Fonteiller. formerly with (he Pup: Victor Laborie: John Dubourdieu. formerly with the 
Poodle Dog. 



MOVED 



Gladding, McBean & Co. 

Office: 311-317 CROCKER BULDING SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

Warehouse: 147 151 MINNA STREET. BMwftn Ne» MonKjomerj ind Third 



CLAY 

PRODUCTS 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 



$ty 1M& of % IftMBP iEnmomtztt? 



The Head of the House perched herself on my knee. 

'•Jim, dear, may I have a new coat? L saw the dearest one 
down-town to-day." 

1 considered that this would be a good time to put into effect 
a little financial scheme which I had hatched some time before. 

"1 have something to tell you, sweetheart," 1 said in a sepul- 
chral tone. "1 have lost a large sum of money in Wall street. 
We are very poor now. 1 hardly know how to make both ends 
meet." 

The Head of the House squirmed around and looked into my 
face with a wealth of sympathy in her brown eyes. 

"Oh, you poor dear!" she cried. "How 1 wish 1 could help 
you." 

"l r ou can," 1 replied, "by economizing." 

"Oh, dear," she sighed, "that is such a horrid way. If 1 could 
only earn some money someway, it would be so much nicer." 

"Ihe expense account is a great item," 1 commented. 

"1 know what I'll do!" she exclaimed suddenly. "1 know just 
the loveliest way to help you, and it will be such fun, too." 

"flow?" I asked. 

"1 will discharge Mary and Agnes, and do all the housework 
myself, and that will save you all that money every month. Won't 
it be splendid ?" 

"But I do not want you to do that," I objected. "You can 
help enough by not buying so many hats and dresses and things." 

".Now, Jim," she protested in a hurt tone, "it is real mean of 
you to talk like that — just as if I were extravagant. Why, that 
old rag of a dress I have now 1 have worn for perfect ages, and 
that hat — I have had only two since Christmas." 

"Three," I corrected. 

"Oh, yes, counting that little rainy-day hat, but that did not 
cost anything at all." 

"Kenwick & Co. seemed to think so," I replied dryly. "At 
least, they sent me a fair-sized bill for it. If they made a mis- 
take " 

"Don't be horrid, Jim," she interrupted severely. "Anyway, 
I am going to do what I said. We can have awfully nice things 
to eat, too. I know lots of perfectly delicious things to have — - 
things that an ordinary cook would never think of." 

My scheme was getting me in pretty deep water, but I decided 
not to retract, for, after all, it might do the Head of the House 
good to have some domestic duties for a while; and, while I 
had misrepresented the financial situation to her, I was not sav- 
ing the amount of money I should, considering my income. 

1 went home that night to find the Head of the House in full 
control of the kitchen. She had paid the servants their full 
month's wages, although it was only the fifth of the month, and 
had started in to run the house herself. She looked very be- 
witching in her white, frilled apron, with her dimpled arms bare 
to the elbows, and her face rosy with excitement, and the hap- 
piness inspired by honest labor shining in her eyes. 

"Oh, Jim," she greeted me, throwing her arms around my 
neck, "I am having the loveliest time ! And just see all the 
pretty things 1 have bought." 

She proudly pointed out. a choice line of fancy cooking utensils. 
Remembering some bills I had been called upon to pay in tire 
past for even the ordinary kind of that line of goods, I groaned 
inwardly, but I was not brute enough to dampen her enthusiasm. 
1 admired them to the best of my ability. 

"And just see here." she went on, "I bought this lovely mat- 
ting at Van Tyng's. It was made in Japan. They sent a man 
right up to lay it. Doesn't it look sweet '{ And I have the love- 
liest dinner for you. We are going to have some of the dearest 
little birds. The butcher told me about them because I said I 
wanted something especially nice. He had to send down-town 
to a big market for them because they are out of season or 
something, and I bought some nice hot-house vegetables because 
you always say you get so tired of eating canned ones, and — and 
— now don't you think I'm a helpful wife ?" 

I put my arms around her, and evaded : "You are a dear little 
girl," I said truthfully. 

"I hope you don't think I was extravagant to buy all those 
things for the kitchen," she said with a trace of uneasiness in her 
voice. "You see, I wouldn't have done it, only I like to cook so 



much that I am never going to let any one else do it again. And 
then, you see, I will be in the kitchen so much that I think it 
ought to be nice, don't you ?" 

I was game. "Yes," I answered. 

The dinner was certainly good. Whatever the Head of the 
House does, she does well, and with a lavish hand; but it would 
have been cheaper dining at a hotel. 

For a week the Head of the House acted as chef of our estab- 
lishment, and when the bills came in I realized that a month of 
her catering would bankrupt me in earnest. Therefore, I cast 
about for a way out of the difficulty. I had fibbed myself into an 
untenable position, now it devolved upon me to fib myself out of 
it. So the next night I came home with an expression of happi- 
ness on my face, which even the sight of the day's additional 
purchases for the kitchen could not remove. 

"I guess the financial crisis has passed," I said cheerfully. 
"With your help I have pulled through, and we are on our feet 
again. So you will not have to do the housework any more." 

The Head of the House was delighted. "Oh, isn't that splen- 
did!" 

I agreed that it was. 

"I really am getting a little tired of cooking," she confessed. 
"Besides, now I can get that new coat." — Leighton Onmun in 
Bohemian Magazine. 



5 / r per month 

SAVED ON THE INVESTMENT 
BY BUYING THE 

Alaska Refrigerator 

800.000 sold since 1878 

We have a test Refrigerator to prove what 
we claim for it. Please call and see it. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 
W. W. MONTAGUE & CO. 

557-563 MARKET STREET 
Opposite Junction Sutter and Sansome streets 



$12,000 
Marine View Lot 

45x120 on Green Street through to alley. 
Unobstructed Marine view. 1 block from 
cars. Nothing better in the city. Apply 
Room 16, 773 Market St., San Francisco. 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



1400 to 1450 Fourth St.. San Francisco. Telephone Market 3014 
Private Exchange Connecting all Departments 

Paper of Every Description 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Succeeding A. Zellerbach & Sons 

Zellerbach Building, S. E. corner Battery and Jackson Streets 



July 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



21 



THE NICK K IMODIUMS. 

There could be nothing more brotherly and good-Samaritan- 
I ike than the conduct of the advisory committee on film morality 

toward the film trust, and any lilthj or BUggestive film it likes 
to turn out to insult the public anew. Let it be anything from 
Venus and Adonis to a blood-curdling murder, or any possible 
. onception to shock or Salome a decent audience out. of face, and 
the advisory committee is there with the "amen" and tin' pat 
on the back; and the member representing the Moving Picture 
Exhibitors' Association is once more lauded as a genius of per- 
suaders by those he represents, whether it be the exhibitors or 
the trust. The representative of the Moving Picture Exhibitors' 
Association, of course, has a right to accept gracefully all such 
laudations, but if his admirers could only know how easy it was 
— or, rather, how easy the rest of the advisory committee are ! 

The News Letter speaks with authority, because it has made a 
painful study of them— much as one might absorb a book on the 
peculiar and particular slant of fools' heads, with a terrible and 
impossible hankering to crowd something more inside a given 
cranium. The slant of a modern fool's head, however, runs 
straight to his poeket book, as a rule. 

On the other hand, if we are to accept their morality for it, 
what is left us to think? Was this honorable board, appointed 
by two honorable boards and a Mayor, and supposed to be gems 
of the first water, was this combination of avowed righteousness 
and all the virtues clinging about its neck brought up in a harem ? 
Or did it originate in the chill draughts of secret-society Russia, 
or the under corridors of old Chinatown? Or at which fashion- 
able club does it mix its punch and highballs? In a word, 
where did it acquire its taste for murders, soul-kisses and 
Apacheing — and with its other accomplishments, hadn't it bet- 
ter take to suicide. 

With regard to its moving picture places, indeed, San Fran- 
cisco has come to that pass, when it has grown so accustomed to 
the lewd and the virulent, that only the lewd and the virulent are 
expected. Papa says to Johnny, after dinner is over, "You must 
go to bed early to-night, boy; I am going out for a run among 
the nickelodiums. What ! Ob, but little boys must not go to 
nickelodiums. No, sir!" 

And papa is right, quite right, in that he speaks in the tone of 
voice of going to see "Zaza," but wrong in the idea that he will 
keep Johnny away from what is forbid and costs only a nickel. 
Johnny steals the niclcel and goes next day. And so through the 
graciousness of the Mayor-stamped advisory committee the child 
learns that theft is only a joke, lust a common, every-day thing 
that there is no sense in keeping away from, and murder a sim- 
ple and effective way of getting back at an enemy. 



Neither does it appear that the advisorj committee, in spi 

Hie children of San Francisco, have any intention of refoi 
themselves. Films pointed out in these columns before a 

that should be condemned, are still going the round.; living 
long, hilarious lives by virtue of their naughtiness and their 
faithful protectors, the committee. 

"Cured by Gymnastics," one of the most repulsive and sug- 
gestive films that could happen, and described here 
weeks ago, was to be seen at the Queen, the Third street, nickel- 
odium, only a few days ago. The Queen aho had a live scalping 
by Indians, and a burning at the stake that would fairly make a 
small boy's teeth chatter for painted literature. This place is 
frequented by many children, too — particularly on amateur 
night. 

Last Monday night the Unique, on Market street, ran "'The 
Resurrection," supposed to be a depiction of Tolstoy's story. As 
Tolstoy, however, has become ashamed of the moral nature of hi.; 
early literature, himself, we would not judge that it was fit for 
a child to read, least of all see on a moving picture film, as acted 
by frenzied fourth-rate actors. But the Unique didn't stop here. 
It also showed a circus scene with a hula-hula dance, the murder 
of a man for his money, and a suicide. 

Another film being shown along the street is "The Martyr- 
dom of Louis XVII." It shows the beheading of a mother by 
the guillotine in front of her boy's eyes. It is in "The Soul 
Kiss," a film by that title, in which the advisory committee most 
revels. If this is their manner of conducting themselves behind 
the curtains, or loving the film trust, the public does not in the 
least desire to see it. 



A GREAT ROUND-UP 



In Los Angeles the past week has been held one of the greatest 
round-ups of the Order of Elks that has ever been held in the 
United States. On this occasion a spirited canvas and an active 
pre-election fight was made for the position of Grand Exalted 
Ruler. After many skirmishes the majority of the herd voted 
in James U. Sammis of Lcmars, Iowa, as the ruler of the Order. 

Los Angeles knows how to entertain, and the Elks know how to 1 
enjoy an unalloyed hospitality. There were automobile rides 
galore, picnic parties, dances, visits to the orange groves, boating, 
sailing and fishing. 

The Elks will come in great numbers to San Francisco, and 
the legal, commercial and social organizations should co-operate 
with the local lodges to entertain the herd. These representative 
men must go away with a fine impression of San Francisco, and 
it behooves us to see that they have it. 





DON'T BY ANY CHANCE OVERLOOK 






Overland Monthly for August 






THE GREAT VACATION MAGAZINE 






OPENING OF THE FLATHEAD RESERVATION 

With Illustrations 

ROBBING FOG OF ITS TERRORS 

With Illustrations 

VAN DYKES "HOUSE OF RIMMON" IN THE 
GREEK THEATRE 

With Illustrations. 















22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, $1,500,000 



Assets, $7,000,000 



California and Sansome Streets, 

San Francisco. California. ^ 

Cash Capital, $200,000. Cash Assets, $629,181.16 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deering, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothln, Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man, F. P. Deering, E. F. Green, James K. Moffitt, J. W. Phillips, 
Henry Rosenfeld, Adolph A. Son, William S. Tevis. 

Head Office— Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 422 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,462,739 

Total Cash Assets 6,366,877 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING. 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. Ltd. 

Of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

320 SANSOME STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

The Weft Coaft Life Insurance Co. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



A strong, well managed Institution; organized under the rigid insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 

National Fire Insurance Company of Hartford 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

CAPITAL $1,000,000.00 

ASSETS 8,260.000.00 

SURPLUS TO POLICY HOLDERS 3,178,468.64 

McNEAR & WAYMAN, GENERAL AGENTS, 

National Building, San Francisco 



Roy C. Ward Jas. K. Polk Jas. W. Dean Geo. E. Billln 

Geo. E. Billings Company 

ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED 



312 California Street 



San Francisco. Cal. 



Phone Douglas 2283 




INSVMG1 




Owing to the resignation of John P. Roche, second vice-presi- 
dent of the Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company, the follow- 
ing promotions have been announced: Danford M. Baker is ad- 
vanced from third to second vice-president. Richard J. Nier 
from assistant secretary to third vice-president; A. W. Morgan 
from comptroller to first assistant secretary; H. E. Moore, from 
superintendent of the renewal department to second assistant 
secretary. Mr. Roche relinquishes his duties in January 1, 1910. 

* * * 

There is a persistent rumor that A. 6. Sanderson will shortly 
resign as home office general agent of the Continental Fire In- 
surance Company to become assistant general agent on the 
Pacific Coast for one of the strong fire insurance companies of 
Hartford, Connecticut. It is said that while the appointment 
lacks the approval of the Hartford company's directorate, it is 
regarded as practically certain that this will be had, and formal 
announcement to that end may be expected within a few days. 

* * * 

When a customer gives the handling of his insurance to an 
agent, he should have another motive than obliging a friend or 
doing a charitable act. He should require the best service 
possible. The customer in most cases knows but little about 
fire insurance. He relies on the agent. The responsibility is, 
therefore, not a light one, for the agent should be able to S3e 
that the property is covered in such a way that there will be no 
dispute if a loss comes so far as the policy itself is concerned. 
It is important that an agent represent companies of financial 
stability, whose indemnity is worth the price paid. If there is 
any doubt in the agent's mind after due investigation is made 
as to the permanency of a company, he has no right to place his 
customers in it, regardless of the commission it offers or its 
liberality as to lines and classes. If knowledge comes to the 
agent that any policy condition is being violated, he should at 
once notify the insured. 

Beware of the life insurance agent who proposes that you drop 
the policy you have, and take another in the company he repre- 
sents. Insist that he put this proposition in writing, and submit 
it to the company you are insured in. You will thus receive the 
benefit of expert advice and save yourself from financial loss. 

* * * 

Commissioner Wolf of California has made a ruling that reg- 
istry companies must cease business under the guise of registry 
companies. They may sell policies as individuals, and he has 
so notified all accident companies selling policies through register 
companies. He has also ruled that accident policies sold by 
means of slot machines are against public policy and the spirit 
of the insurance laws. 

* * * 

The lower house of the Washington Legislature has passed the 
bill abolishing the office of insurance commissioner, but in the 
Senate two votes were lacking of the required majority, it being 
understood that the delay was due to a desire to enforce im- 
peachment proceedings against Insurance Commissioner Schive- 
ley. A committee has been 'appointed to formulate articles of 
impeachment against Commissioner ScMveley, who has been 
charged with imposing excessive charges upon insurance com- 
panies for his personal benefit. Schiveley already has been in- 
dicted. 

* * * 

Insurance Commissioner E. Myron Wolf has informed Harlow, 
Hewitt & Co., insurance brokers of San Francisco, that their 
method of insurance is contrary to the law regulating insurance 
in California. Hewitt and his associate, J. F. Parkinson, of 
Palo Alto, manage the insurance section of the Retail Hardware 
Men's Association and the Retail Grocers' Association, which or- 
ganizations conduct a system of inter-insurance between their 
members. They claim that their business has been perfectly 
legitimate and within the provisions of the law. 






July 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



23 



Major James B. Day, an old-time San Francisco insurance 
man, lias located in Denver. 

The Sovereign Fire has been admitted to Colorado, reporting 
to C. J. Stovel, San Francisco. 

TJ. S. Consul Winslow at Valparaiso informs the State Depart- 
ment that there is a good field for American fire insurance com- 
panies in Chile. 

The Maryland Casualty Company, upon re-entering Colorado, 
has re-appointed W. G. Maitland, of Denver, its general agent 
for that State. 

Under a re-arrangement of interest, Robert Dickson, formerly 
of San Francisco, has been appointed general agent of the Ger- 
man Union Fire of Baltimore. 

Assistant Manager C. B. Cornell, of the Fidelity and Casualty's 
Pacific Coast department, is in New York. 

While the Dixie Fire has not completed its statement since the 
North State was merged with it, the capital will be $500,000, 
the same as before. 

The celebration of the Fourth this year did not assess the usual 
heavy toll on fire insurance companies. 

A. C. Morgan, special agent of the Providence-Washington, 
has had Oregon added to his field. 

J. S. Suydam has been appointed as special agent of the Home 
Fire in Southern California. 

* * * 

Special Agent Bishop, of the Northwestern National, has 
moved his headquarters from Seattle to Helena, Mont. 

The splitting of commissions by fire insurance agents with 
customers for the purpose of getting business, is not permissible 
in the State of Washington under the anti-rebate law, which just 

went into force. 

* * * 

The Prussian National Fire Insurance Company, which pulled 
out after the big fire and compelled claimants to fight at long 
distance, is contemplating a return to California. 

Manager Bolla V. Watt, of the Royal, is making a visit to the 
East. 

The State Fire of Iowa Im* applied for ;i California license. 



THE VOICE OF THE TREES. 

Hold, hold your hand, my brother! Lift it not up against me — 

So sighed the pine on the mountain, so whispered the oak of 

the plain. 

We guard the source of your rivers and send them pure to the sea, 

We hold in our roots and branches the fragrant breath of the 

rain. 

Through the storms of bygone ages our kindred and <we have 

stood, 
And sheltered the pools of the forest and the brooks where 

fishes play; 
The toilers for rest have sought us, and the healing breath of the 

wood 
Has strengthened the weak and weary who were fainting by the 

way. 

Hold, hold your hand, my brother ! When your children turn 
away 
From the roar of the sleepless city, grown faint from its fever- 
ish life. 
Will you show them a barren country, where suns scorch and wind 
storms play, 
And say : "Here once was a refuge — a haven of rest from 
strife?" 

"Here was earth as the Lord God made it, with the shade of the 
stately trees, 
And here were the shy, sweet wild flowers, smiling up from the 
sheltered land; 
Here was peace and here was healing in the breath of the tem- 
pered breeze — 
We laid it waste as you see it for a handful of gold in the 
hand." 

— Ninette M. Lowaier, in the New York Sun. 



A Domestic Eye Remedy, 



Compounded by Experienced Physicians. Conforms to Pure Food and 
Drugs Laws. Wins Friends Wherever Used. Ask Druggists for Murine 
Eye Remedy. Try Murine in Your Eyes. You Will Like Murine. 



LOW RATES 
TO 



Alaska- Yukon - Pacific 

Exposition 



FOR ROUND TRIP 


TICKETS 


FROM 




SAN FRANCISCO 


$32.50 


SACRAMENTO 


32.50 


LATHROP 


32.50 


STOCKTON 


.>-\50 


TRACY 


32.50 


SUISUN 


32.50 


DAVIS 


32.50 


NAPA 


32.75 


SANTA ROSA 


33.60 


CALISTOGA 


33.95 



Greatly reduced rates from other points in California. Tickets sold 

daily until September 30, and cover two months' trip going 

and coming via the famous 

Shasta Route 

of the 

Southern Pacific 



Stopovers going and coming. Many other routes at slightly higher 
rates for you to select from . 

Write or call on our nearest agent for full details of service, etc. 
or address 

FLOOD BUILDING for information 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



Joly 17, 1909 




mowMSi 



t^^j^ —^nmc 




The Motor Hunt. 

The News Letter Motor Hunt set for 
the last Sunday in August is attracting a 
great deal of attention among owners and 
dealers because of the fact that it is an 
event in which enjoyment pure and simple 
enters, and in which there is no sort of 
speed contest. The question is, to find 
the quarry car the greatest number of 
limes and get as many quarry cards as 
possible. Find all the controls it is pos* 
sible to lind. These controls will be 
placed irregularly, close together or far 



apart, and they 
will not be easy 
to find although 
plainly marked. 

In the map, 
shown this week. 
it will be seen 
that there "are 
dotted sections 
— these sections 
are the sanctu- 
aries into which 
the hunted ear 

or quarry may pass, but into which it may 
not be followed by the hunters. 

The quarry car, carrying yellow flags 
with black dots, must emerge sometime,, 
and. as it must keep on the move, it may 
quite easily be caught as it emerges from 
the sanctuary. 

In next week's News Letter the detailed 
map of the various sanctuaries will be given, as well as the rules 
governing the hunt from the time the cars cross the bridge be- 
low Uncle Tom's Cabin in the morning until it is re-crossed on 
the homeward run in the evening. 

Get in line for the big Motor Hunt, the first big event of thi9 
kind on the Pacific Coast. Reserve the last Sunday in August 
and be a hunter on August 29th. 

The pursuing cars are to follow the route indicated by the 
heavy black line in the map. The quarry car may be found 
anywhere on the road between the bridge below Uncle Tom's and 
the Hotel Vendome at San Jose or at Los Gatos, the extreme 
southern ends of the Hunt ran. 

There is sanctuary at San Mateo, which will be shown as an- 
nounced above, in a detail map. There is sanctuary at Los Altos, 
the car that is pursued may run down to Los Altos and return 



either by the Junction or by Mountain View. There is sanctuary 
territory bounded by Old Mountain View, by Santa Clara, San 
Jose, Los Gatos, and Saratoga. 

The announcement that the Motor Hunt would take place on 
the last Sunday in August has been enthusiastically received by 
all those who own ears, and by the dealers and the automobile 
clubs. 

Previous to the publication of a set date, care was taken to 
find out if any event of importance might interfere with the 
success of the day. The Motor Hunt has aroused the enthusiasts 
and everything else has been side-tracked. The idea was ac- 
cepted cordially by all, and the following letters testify to the 
enterprise and the get-together spirit of the energetic men ap- 
pealed to by the News Letter automobile editor: 

San Francisco. Cal., June 21, 1909. 
Editor News Letter — Dear Sir: I am in receipt of your favor 
of the 18th inst., and in reply would say that, if you will advise 
me just what date, or dates, will suit yon best for your contem- 
plated "Motor Hunt," I will see that no events will be held by 
this association during the month of August which might conflict 
witli your plans. Awaiting your reply. 

Yours very truly. 

Max L. Rosenfeld. 
President Automobile Dealers' Association of California. 

San Francisco, June 23d. 
Fditor News Letter — 

Dear Sir: In' reply to 
your favor of June 19th, I 
beg to say that this Asso- 
ciation does not hold auto- 
mobile events in the nature 
of runs, meets, etc., and 
hence has nothing in con- 
templation that will inter- 
fere with the Motor Hunt 
to which you refer, and in 
connection with which you 
have my best wishes. 
Very truly, 
L. P. Lowe, 
President California State 

Automobile Association. 
San Francisco, July 8th. 

Editor N ews L etter — 

Dear Sir: Your letter of 

Tune 17th was received in 

due lime, and this matter 

was brought up for discus- 



HOT-£»- 
VENDOME 



■San jose 



Th 



e rm o t 



d Brake 
Lining 



Hughson An d Merton 



WILL NOT BURN— LASTS INDEFINITELY 
FACTORY 

REPRESENTATIVES 



438 Market Street 
San Francisco 



July 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



25 



sion and attention at a recent meeting of the Board of 

Directors, and it was decided that it would in no way conflict 

with our schedule of events. Up to the present time we have not 

set an August date, but there is some talk among the members 

of the club of our holding a track race at Tanforan in August, 

Although this has not been definitely decided as yet, it may be 

postponed until September. Assuring' you of our co-operation 

and wishing the "Motor Hunt" success, we beg to remain, 

Yours very truly, 

San Francisco Motor Club. 

Wm. E. Johnston, Secretary. 
* * * 

Los Angeles Races. 

Popularly, the Santa Monica road races were a great success. 
It is estimated that more than fifty thousand people saw this 
big contest of cars, and the excitement in some of the finishes 




shue's time was three hours, eight minutes and three seconds, 
while that of the Chadwiek was 3.15.30. The Stearns followed 
close on the heels of the Chadwiek, third in the big race, with a 
time that read 3.19.52, and the Locomobile, Stoddanl-Dayton, 
the Lnzicr, the Pope-Hartford and the Columbia were in the 
"also ran" class, and made good time. 

Two minor accidents occurred, but apart from the fad thai ii 
was mortifying to the owners of the Stoddard-Dayton to skid nil' 
(he course, and to lose a tire, and for the Haynes to ruin a palm 
tree, nothing of any kind happened to harm mechanician, driver 
or onlooker. 

The prettiest part of the day's races was the contest between 
the small cars, the Stoddard-liayton and the Chalmers-Detroit. 
At the fifth lap the Stoddard-Dayton was ahead with six sec- 
onds to the good, and by the time the tenth lap was made, this 
increase was one minute and one second. The enthusiastic 
friends of the car were at fever heat as to what the succeeding 
laps would bring forth. Now, Dingley began to overhaul the 
leader, and presently he was clipping down the leader second by 
second until the 18th lap, and then forged to the front. Then 
he passed the Stoddard-Dayton, and from this time on it was 
simply a question of the readability under the most severe test 
whether Dingley would keep the lead so hardly won. The Buick 
was right behind and pressing close on to the Stoddard-Dayton, 
when it had to slow down for tire repairs.' Bert Dingley in the 
Chalmers-Detroit won. 

Throughout the day there were thrills enough to keep the big 
crowd busy with their favorites. 

* * * 

The road from Santa Barbara to Los Angeles is in a most 
deplorable condition and demands immediate attention. In 
fact, those recently returned from touring the Southern part of 
I he State will go us one. better in describing the stretch referred 
to by qualifying it as "rotten." 

* * * 

Raj Densmore, Cuyler Lee's expert, has just returned from 
the Packard factorv. 



Harris M. Hanshue, winner with Apperson "I Santa Monica. 

was quite out of the ordinary. Harris Hanshue was dearly the 
hero of the occasion on the winning of the Dick Perria trophy. 
It was a clean victory for the Apperson e;ir. and Uan-dme cam' 1 
in for the plaudits of the multitude. 

Hanshue made his car make something a trifle under an aver- 
age of G1.2 miles to the hour, and had file track been better, he 
would have won the proud distinction of '■ Vanderbilt 

race time. 

In the small car race, the Chalmers-Detroit, with Berl Ding- 
ley at the wheel, came in in slapping good time, showing a 

capacity for devouring the highway thai won for this driver 
and his car the Leon Shettler cup. The two races were enthu- 
siastically cheered by the big crowd, 'IT, 
miles made by the Chalmers-Detroit was at the rate of 55.2 
miles an hour. The Chadwiek. with Bruno Seibert as drii 
was third. The car followed Hanshue over the course. Uan-jiA* 




Whatever model Speedwell you buy— Roadster, Touring 
Car or Baby Tonneau. you get the same marvelous 
40-45 H. P. engine on a car that is perfecT in every de- 
tail— "the bes~t that can be built" — completely equipped, 
except top. at S2850. 

Speedwell Motor Car Company 



of California 



Phone Market 6951 



489 Golden Gate Avenue 



RENAULT "The Car" Guaranteed For Life 




50-60 HP. 6-Cjlinder Chassis $7500 1216 HP 4-Cyhnder Chassis $3250 

.15-45 HP 4-C«linder Chassis $6000 10-14 HP. 4-Cjlioder Chassis $3000 

20-30 H-P. 4-Cylinder Chassis $5000 9-12 HP . 2-C)lindtr Chassis $2000 

14-20 HP. 4-Cvlindn Chassis $4000 8-10 HP. Voiturelte. compleielj 

equipped $1750 

RUNABOUTS, TOURING CARS. LIMOUSINES, LANDAULETS 

THE MOST COMPLETE LINE EVER HANDLED BY ANY 

MANUFACTURER. ALL CHASSIS SPECIALLY BUILT FOR 

AMERICAN ROADS. 



RENAl'I.T ">v-Spcos! With To* 1 onneaa. $5750. 

RENAULT FRERES SELLING BRANCH INC. 

316-322 Van Ness Ave.. San Francisco. Cal. Telephone. Market ,038 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 



Beautiful 

Paraiso Hot Springs 

The Mecca for Automobiles 



New Auto Boulevard from Soledad 
to the Springs. Roads in firsl-class 
condition from Oakland to Paraiso. 
Special Rates; care and attention 
paid to motor parties. New Garage. 
Supplies, gasolene, oils and repairs 
at city prices. 



Most wonderful natural hot mineral 
waters and baths on the Coast. The 
only HOT SODA baths in California 
positively guaranteed to cure rheu- 
matism, gout, malaria, liver, kidney 
and stomach troubles. 



Mineral waters awarded first prize 
at St. Louis Exposition. Climate 
unexcelled. Rates $1 2.00 to $16.00, 
baths included. 



Train leaves 3rd and Townsend at 
8 a. m. connecting with AUTOMO- 
BILE at Soledad, arriving at Springs 
for lunch. 



Booklets at Peck's, 789 Market St.; Bryan's, 2004 Sutter St., 
San Francisco,or H.H. McGowan, Paraiso, Monterey Co.,Cal. 



Chalmers-Detroit "30" 



The beginning and the end car. 

In the beginning the initial price is slightly 
higher, in the end the upkeep and after expense is 
much less. 

•ANYBODY CAN CUT PRICES BUT IT TAKES 
BRAINS TO MAKE A BETTER ARTICLE." 

(Elbert Hubbard.) 

Buying a good car is only one slep in the right 
direction. 

BUT 

Buying a good car from the moft reliable dealers 
on the Pacific Coast is your absolute assurance of 
satisfaction. 

The Pioneer Automobile Company is the largest 
concern west of Chicago giving its undivided at- 
tention to the sale of automobiles. Ten years in 
business assures our stability and perpetuates our 
guarantees. Our business motto is "Right or 
Made Right." 



The PIONEER AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 



Oakland 



901 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
San Francisco 



Fresn 



The Mitchell Family. 

Family re-unions are quite the thing, but family re-unions in 
the automobile line are not common enough that they may occur 
without attracting attention, and when it is realized thai the 
Mitchell re-union is of such import that a special commissioner, 
as it were, a man of urbane and genial temperament, is sent oul 
from the ancestral home of the Mitchell's to look after the pres- 
ent generation of the Mitchell children when they come together, 
one may judge how important it is to be a mere member of the 
big Mitchell family. At Alum Rock last Sunday the clan Mit- 
chell came together for the annual jubilation, and there were up- 
wards of two hundred of the cars present. The Mitchell car 
was not alone, however, for the speedway was lined by about 
two hundred other cars of various make? whose owners took ad- 
vantage of the beautiful weather to take part, even if only as on- 
lookers at the Mitchell re-union, and to take part in the clean, 
unprofessional sport always incidental thereto. 

The records made were excellent, especially when it is remem- 
bered that none of these cars was stripped or in racing condition. 

There were about fifty entries, made by drivers of both sexes. 
The same judges who officiated last year kindly consented to act 
again in that capacity. They were A. H. Marten, George B. 
Polhemus, and Dr. R. L. Benepe. 

Ladies' Class — Won by Marion Wolcott, San Francisco; time 
1.19 1-5; Mrs. F. W. Cattleman, Stockton, second; Mrs. W. H. 
P. Hill, Monterey, third. 

Model "40" class — Won by R. M. Bowerton, Petaluma, time 
1:18; Robert Neill, Watsonville, second. 

Model "30" class — Won by A. E. Curtner, San Jose, time 

1.15 3-5 ; C. A. Pomerov, San Jose, second ; C. Hampton, Sonora, 
third. 

Model "20" class — Won bv R. L. Rigdon, San Francisco, time 

1.16 1-5 i W. II. P. Hill, Monterey, second; T. L. Campbell, San 
Jose, third. 

Touring ear class, old model — Won by L. P. Brassy, San Jose, 
time 1.06; J. Ghirardelli, Oakland, second; E. P. Lion, San 
Jose, third. 

Runabouts, "Id models — Won by Forest Newell, Oakland, 
time 1.23 1-5: C. E. Anderson, San Francisco, second; J. W. 
Quinn. Oakland, third. 

Professional class — Won by W. I'. Davis, Oakland, time 1.13 
1-5: George Skinner. Sacramento, second; Oscar Olsen, San 

Tost - third. 

+ * * 

The Olympic Club Meet. 

Announcement is made of the third annual automobile meet 
of the OK in | iir ( 'lub, to be held at Tanforan Park on August 22d. 
There is to lie a prize for the winner of each event and a prize 
for the seconds. The idea is to foster keener competition in the 
races. On Sunday, ihe 15th of August, the club will have a 
run in San dose. The proposition is for the auto parties to go 
down in the morning, enjoy a swim at the Vendome, and return 

n the after] n or evening. The track at Tanforan is to be put 

into prime condition for the events of the twenty-second, and it 
will lie impossible for any one, once the races are on, to get on 
the track. Every possibility of' accident will by this and other 
measures be averted. 

* * * 

The Color of Automobiles. 

It would seem that owners of cars would find it profitable and 
pleasurable withal to study the color of their cars. Red seems 
to be going out of fashion for many reasons. It is easily seen 
at a long distance, and is usually a blot on the landscape. White 
or any very light color is prone to be injured, and when dirty is 
simply rile in appearance. Blue is the favorite color just now, 
ami a table just prepared shows that there is a big predominance 
of cars of (hat color. Green is a close second, while dark wine 
color seems to be becoming quite a fad. There is opportunity for 
the exercise of much individual taste in fittings, leather and 
painting, and it is surprising, especially so in San Francisco, 
that there are so few cars showing the owner's good color sense. 

* * * 

Tony Nichols, the well-known representative of Morgan & 
Wright tires, is never seen nowadays without a wide smile on 
his face. The special tires which the Morgan & Wright factory 
are building for San Francisco service are giving such excellent 
satisfaction that Tony's heart grows glad within him. 



July 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



27 



PUTTING STRENGTH AND ENDURING QUALITIES 
INTO THE AUTOMOBILE. 

By Henry Souther 
Association of Licensed Automobile Manufacturers. 

It is probable that there has never been a period of such rapid 
development in the metal trades as has occurred in connection 
with the automobile industry. The work was largely started and 
carried through by those pioneer automobile manufacturers con- 
stituting the Association of Licensed Automobile Manufacturers. 

In America the tremendous importance of heat treatment of 
steel has been grasped, and the principles involved therein car- 
ried to an ultimate conclusion. Intelligent heat treatment is 
quite as essential as the quality of steel; a commonplace steel 
may be given very good physical qualities by proper heat treat- 
ment, and the best of steel can be ruined by lack of it. There 
must be thoroughness in the various operations of annealing, 
hardening and tempering. Treatment carried on with sufficient 
care makes uniformity of product possible. How necessary this 
is in important drop forgings is obvious. 

The difference between ordinary material and the best of 
material is a great one. For example, the elastic limit of ordi- 
nary steel is 40,000 pounds to the square inch, with, say, a 
reduction of area of 50 per cent. Properly heat-treated, nickel 
steel will have an elastic limit of two or two and one-half times 
this figure, and yet have a reduction of area of 50 per cent or 
more. 

Brittleness does not follow intelligent heat treatment; and 
the enduring quality is increased in greater ratio than the elas- 
tic limit. Consequently crystallization, fatigue or whatever the 
cause of breakage we are to prevent, is called, is less likely in a 
properly heat-treated and tempered material, than in an an- 
nealed and soft, specimen. This having been discovered in the 
laboratory and established in actual practice, is now accepted 
by the metallurgical world, reversing previous general belief. 

Another commonly accepted belief has been that the stronger 
a piece of steel is the stiffer it is; for example, that if one steel 
is twice as strong as another, it will bend only half as much under 
a given weight. Rut actual tests have shown that a chrome 
nickel steel, having an elastic limit of 150.000 or more pounds 
per square inch, bends under a given load the same amount as a 
carbon steel. This is true as long as the load is within the elas- 
tic limit of the weaker material. 

The elastic limit of a well-tempered piece of spring steel is 
above 150,000 pounds per square inch. Tf a spring be made of 
soft steel and not loaded beyond its elastic limit, it would return 
every time to its original shape, but the deflection would not be 



Ivan L de Jongh 



High grade automobile repairing. 
Holley high-tension magnetos. 
Stewart and Holley Carburetors installed. 
Storage Battery charging. 



446 FULTON STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



sufficient to make a good spring; it would be hardly noticeable. 
The automobile industry has forced the spring maker to depart 
from his old materials and methods. 

Assume that a good .20 carbon steel has been used with satis- 
faction for a year or two on a given design of crankshaft, neither 
bending nor breaking through long-continued use. Assume the 
bearing surfaces are as small in area as possible to run properly. A 
crankshaft of highly-treated chrome nickel steel, having an elas- 
tic limit four or five times as high as the .20 carbon material, 
would be no stiffer; but would have increased life and last much 
longer. 

Eeally sound knowledge as to steel has been spreading fast 
among the intelligent manufacturers, who use much discrimina- 
tion in separating the false from the good. They have established 
testing laboratories and examine for themselves what materials 
they buy. There are, perhaps, a dozen first-class grades of steel 
in the market (and America has a market at least as good as 
any in the world, with, of course, always the option of buying 
abroad for any real or fancied reason) suitable for the highest 
class of automobile construction. 

Bronze is stil! an important factor. Here the casting method 
is all important. 

Aluminum alloys are of great interest. 

Where any form of plain journal is used, the bearing metal 
question seems to have settled down to a high grade tin-anti- 
mony alloy, running against a soft shaft ; a hardened shaft run- 
ning on a good phosphor-bronze; or a soft shaft running on a 
white bronze. All of these combinations are giving good results. 

The large part of tin of an automobile engine cylinder 

is in the finishing labor, and not in the iron. In the foundries 
there are many compli ons arising from what a layman 

would think I rifling matters, in the production of first-class 
sound cylinders. 




U SE£. MONOGRAM O 




Moore 
Motor 
Supply 
Company 



Distributors for 
Monogram Oil 



V \S NESS AND GOLDEN 
GATE AVENTES. 
S\N FRANCISCO 

OAKLAND 
LOS ANGELES 



-j :7a 



>ND PRIZE RACE 

SAVANNAH, NOV. 26'-? 1908 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 



The Peer of All! 

DEMAND 

AUTOMOBILE 
OILS 



PLANET 



TAKE NO SUBSTITUTE 

Bass-Hueter Co. 



816 Mission Street 

Adapted to Every Machine 

"Fridtion Costs More Than Lubrication 



Distributors 



ARRIVED 



1910 



1910 



The Autocar 

4 cyl. 30 H. P. Type XX Light Touring 
Car, $1900, £ o. b. San Francisco 



Bosch Double Ignition System. Come in and see the 
first of the new season's models. 

Walter C. Morris, 

Tel. Franklin 3777. 640 VAN NESS AVE- 



REO 

AND 

J. W. LEAVITT & CO. 

Golden Gate Ave., cor. Hyde St. Phone Market 411 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF REPAIRING AUTO 
LAMPS, RADIATORS AND FENDERS AT SHORT 
NOTICE. Phone Market 751 




METAL SPINNING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 



T A X I C A B S 

(Genuine RENAULT Cars) 

PACIFIC TAXIMETER CAB COMPANY 

Solicits your patronage of its equipment of imported 
Renault Taxicabs and will show its appreciation by 
prompt and reliable service. * * * * 

TELEPHONE 

FRANKLIN 4848 

Private Exchange connecting all Departments 

MAIN STATION AND GENERAL OFFICES, 1355-63 BUSH STREET 
FAY C. BEAL, General Manager. 



The Call of tie Auto. 

Ho ! for the long and level road ; 

Sing ho ! for the fragrant dust ; 
Who would lose, for a king's abode, 

The thrill of the wanderlust ! 

Ho! for the swift, impatient car, 

The honk of the coaxing horn; 
The hazy hills that call, alar. 

In the cool, persuasive morn. 

Ho ! for the pulsing ride at noon 

To the land of pure delight ; 
But, oh, the day goes none too soon 

For the witching ride at night. 

He misses the keenest joy of life 

The fellow who docs not feel 
Above the rushing hurry and strife, 

The call of a gay 'mobile. 

— Annie Proud Hampton. 

* * * 

On the 14th. the run of the autos of all kinds and classes, 
starting from Detroit on the 12th, will have reached Chicago. 
This is what is known as the Reliability Run of the American 
Automobile Association. Thirteen cars are entered for the 
Glidden trophy, and the run has heretofore been known as the 
Glidden tour, which name will probably stick to it as more 
popular than the long one quoted above. In the touring run- 
abouts, the Hower trophy has attracted fourteen entrants. Three 
machines are competing for the Detroit prize for miniature 
tonneau and double rumble cars. 

The Glidden contest this year is one thousand miles longer 
than at any other time, and a glance at the following schedule 
will convince any reader of the News Letter of the cruel grueling 
to be endured, not only by men but my machines: 

Only three of the fifteen days' runs calls for less than 150 
miles, and the last day of the tour demands that the machines 
cover 212.8 miles from Salina, Kas., to Kansas City. Kalama- 
zoo, Mich., 112.3 miles out, is the objective point on the first 
day. The second day will bring them into Chicago, 173.3 miles 
farther west. 

Leaving Chicago, July 14th, the tourists will spend the night 
at Madison, Wis. From Madison to La Crosse, Wis., 154.4 miles, 
is the run for July 15th. On July 16th the machines will travel 
177.8 miles to Minneapolis. Two days will be spent there. July 
19th. Minneapolis to Mankato, Minn., 132 miles; July 20th to 
Port Dodge, Iowa, 136.6 miles ; July 21st to Council Bluffs, 181 
miles: July 22d to Kearney, Neb.', 200.2 miles; July 23d to 
Julesburg, Col., 206.2 miles': July 24th to Denver, 204.8 miles. 

The tourists will spend July 25th and 26th in Denver. On 
the 27th they will leave Denver for Hugo, Col. The last three 
.lav? are as follows: Hugo to Oakley, Kas., 165 miles; July 29th 
to Salina. Kas., 199.7 miles, and July 30th to Kansas City, Mo., 
212.8 miles. 

* * * 

Among others motoring in on Saturday night of last week for 
an fiver-Sunday stay at Pacific Grove Hotel were Mr. and Mrs. 
C. P. Hindes of Menlo, in their Stoddard-Dayton car. They 
had their family with them. Charles L. Adams, owner of a large 
stock business, who drove down from San Prancisco in a Buick 
machine. en route to his Hanford ranch holdings: Charles Bees 
and Harry Rees and wife came in a Reo from Stockton. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Larzaliere, who when in their home city are 
permanent guests at Hotel St. Francis, with Mr. and Mrs. J. L. 
Romer and Mrs. J. Miles, autoed to Pacific Grove by moonlight 
on the night of the 3d. Leaving San Francisco at 8 :30, they 
arrived here at 4 o'clock on the morning of the 4th, took the 17- 
mile drive in the afternoon of Sunday, and were off for the 
metropolis on Monday. 

» * * 

The citizens of TJkiah should do something to induce the 
proper officials to repair the road from TJkiah through to Lake 
County. It is now in a deplorable condition. The road from 
C'loverdale to Pieta, and from Pieta to Highland, and on into 
Lake County, is in first-class condition. Ukiah people should 
take a lesson from this highway. 



July 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



29 



JjteteUs 



Satisfaction 



One hundred and sixty-two Mitchell 
automobiles carrying five hundred and 
fourteen satisfied owners assembled at 
San Jose, July 10th and 11th. 

"Show Me" a parallel assemblage. 

Osen & Hunter Auto Co. 



San Francisco 



HOMES 
San Jose 



Oakland 



BUICK 



Continues Triumphal March 



Columbus, Ohio, July 2nd and 3rd 
Stock Car Events 



Buicks entered seven events. 

Won both 1st and 2nd in all seven events. 

■Won 1st, 2nd and third in 10O miles American 
Championship, lowering its own, the world's record 
for cars regardless of price, for every mile from 50 
to 100, and defeating among others, Barney Oldfleld 
in his six-cylinder National, (Savanah Grand Prize 
car,) and Chalmers-40. 

Duplicates of these speedy cars, 

"WHITE STREAK" $1150, f. o. b. San Francisco 
BUICK-40, $1900. f. o. b. San Francisco. 

Think It Over 
HOWARD AUTOMOBILE CO. 

523-533 Golden Gate Avenue 
Telephone Market 1636 San Francisco 



ONCE MORE 

G&JllRES 

WIN 



The continued evidence of their superiority, 
brought out from day to day, must bring home to you 
the fact that they are absolutely the best tires the 
market offers. 

Put our 1909 product on "y° ur car, and tire 
trouble, for you, is past history. 




414-416 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Market 1095. 



AUTO LIVERY 
COMPANY 

Agents for the famous 

APPERS0N CARS 



Salesrooms and Garage: N.W. corner 
Van Ness and Golden Gate Avenues. 
The finest livery service in the West. 

Ring up FRANKLIN 1535 

Bargains in second hand cars of various makes 



30 San Francisco News Letter 

Representative Garages of San Francisco. 



July 17, 1909 



Washington and East Streets 



Phone Kearny 678 



Ferry Garage Company 

All Workmanship Guaranteed 



Storage 



Renting 



. Supplies 



MOTOR CAR SERVICE CO. 

J. W. PEARSON. General Manager 
Market and Van Ness 



"The finesit Motor Car 
Station in the World." 



Phone Market 170S 



Auto Livery Co. 



M. L. Rosenfeld, Mgr. 
Van Ness and Golden Gate. Phone Franklin 1535 



The Renstrom 


Garage 




424 to 446 Stanyan 


Street. 


Tel. Park 476 


Golden Gate School of 
Automobile Engineering 


A. GILCREST 


Automobile 
Clearing House 


419-425 Lirkin Street 
Phone Franklin 3391 




San Francisco, Cal 



Thomas B. JefFery & Company, 117-126 Valencia St.. San Francisco 



ASK ABOUT 

A J A X TIRE 

INSURANCE 

AJAX-GRIEB RUBBER COMPANY 

N. Eail Corner 57th Street and Broadway, New York. Factories, Trenton. N. J. 
Branches in all large cities 



CAL. 



AU10 TOP 



CO. 



SEAT COVERS, DUST HOODS, ETC. 
309 GOLDEN GATE AVE. E. H. MORGAN. Mgr. 



Your Wisest Move 

■will be to equip your car with a 

Splitdorf Magneto 

the Magneto that gave such perfect ignition all through the 
severest test ever known— the recent lO.OOOmile Non-Stop Run 
of the Maxwell car. 

Ask for Magneto catalog. 

C. F. SPLITDORF 

Pacific Coast Branch 
520 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 



"OIL IS CHEAPER THAN FRICTION' 

EASTERN f\ I 

AUTOMOBILE UIL 

EFFICIENT NON-CARBONIZING ECONOMICAL 




AsTc your garage. California Compounding Company, Pacific 
Coast Distributors. 




Taxicab in Golden Gate Pari-. Several of the new Renault 
cabs have arrived in San Francisco, and have been delivered to 
the Pacific Taximeter Cab Company, who are doing a phenome- 
nal business. 

Scores of automobile owners who participated in the long pro- 
cession between Chicago and the Crown Point race course had an 
opportunity to witness a demonstration of the Rambler spare 
wheel, in which Charles T. Jeffery, General Manager of Thomas 
B. Jeffery & Company, the originators of this device, came to the 
timely assistance of F. L. Winslow. a Rambler owner from 
Riverside, Illinois. 

Mr. Winslow is the owner of a 1907 Rambler, which has seen 
two years of service. While driving to Crown Point, one of his 
front wheels was struck by another car, which broke all of the 
spokes. The owner, not possessing the spare wheel equipment, 
was left stranded on the road. 

Some time later, Mr. Jelfery and his party came up in a 
Rambler model forty-five equipped with a spare wheel. Imme- 
diately this handy accessory was offered to Mr. Winslow, and the 
adjustment was made very quickly, notwithstanding that the 
spare wheel was two inches larger in diameter than Mr. Wins- 
low's wheel. The owner stepped into his car, continued to Crown 
Point, and returned to his home at Riverside without further 
difficulty. 

* * * 

L. IT. Wagner, of the Wagner Apartments of Oakland, jumped 
into the front seat of his new Oldsmobile last Sunday, and after 
driving about town a short time, took a few friends aboard and 
motored to San Jose and return. Inasmuch as this is the first 
time Mr. Wagner ever sat behind an automobile steering wheel, 
it is astonishing to note how quickly he learned, for he not only 
drove the round trip unaided, but finished bis first try by driving 
down Broadway, in Oakland. The party consisted of Mr. and 
Mis. Wagner and Mr. and Mrs. Wall. Wagner was not a bit tired 
after making his long initial tour, and his friends expect his 
business to suffer, now that he is so enthusiastic about his Olds- 
mobile. 

The Frank 0. Renstrom Co., agents for the Pullman automo- 
bile, expect to receive their first shipment of 1910 Pullmans 
sometime during the coming month. There has been a great de- 
mand for the Pullman this season, and the factory has sold out 
its entire stock for '09. Mr. Charles J. Turner has just returned 
from a trip to San Jose and vicinity, in his Pullman touring car. 
He state? that the" trip was an enjoyable one, and was without 
the slightest mishap or delay. Mr. Turner also states that he 
made this trip, covering about two hundred miles in all, on two 

gallons of gasoline. 

» * * 

James H. Teitzen, a wealthy oil operator of Santa Maria, and 
W. H. Dumphy motored to Del Monte on Thursday, tin- 8th. 

L. E. Hanchett and B. M. Corbet, of San Francisco, motored 
to Del Monte on the 9th, joining Mrs. L. J. Hanchett, of San 
Jose, and their families, who are enjoying a vacation at that 

beautiful spot. 

* * * 

Mrs. C. C. Clay, her daughter, Miss Madeline, and Miss Sue 
Harold, left in the Clay Thomas limousine for Lake County re- 
cently, to spend a week or ten days in that picturesque region. 






July 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



31 



R. C. Good, a leather manufacturer of Hackettstown, N. J., 
started out this week with his whole family for a unique 3,000 
mile trip in two large Locomobile touring cars. The party is 
headed towards the mountains of Kentucky, principally lor the 
purpose of permitting Mr. Qood lo visit his boyhood home in a 
remote village some distance from Louisville, which he has not 
seen for thirty years. This motor enthusiast, who already has 
toured thousands of miles in his 40 h. p. Locomobile, recently 
made his daughter, Miss Bertha Good, a present of a 30 h. p. 
model of this make, and she will endeavor to drive it the entire 
scheduled distance. Her father will pilot his big car with his 
son as alternate; Mrs. Good and the rest of the family being 
content to go as passengers. 

The tour mapped out includes Philadelphia, Harrisburg, 
Gettysburg and the war country, Pittsburg and various cities of 
Ohio, and thence into the blue grass of Kentucky. After spend- 
ing a few weeks at the old homestead, the party will proceed up 
through Ohio and Indiana, and over to the shore of Lake Brie as 
far as Buffalo. Following this, the Locomobile family will pro- 
ceed to New England, visiting the glorious country of the White 
Mountains and Berkshires, returning probably not before Sep- 
tember. 

* * * 

Superintendents of the mechanical departments of Packard 
dealers throughout the country have been visiting the factory of 
the Packard Motor Car Company, Detroit, for the past two 
weeks. Meetings have been held, daily, at which all mechanical 
features of Packard 1910 cars have been discussed, as well as 
the general conduct of Packard repair work and shop service for 
owners. The visitors, also, have spent much time in the factory, 
studying Packard methods of construction and the actual manu- 
facture of the new models. There has been road work in new 
cars, and the social side of the conventions has taken the form 
' of drives into the country for frog-and-chicken dinners seasoned 
with shop talk. 

Most of the Packard dealers' superintendents were taught their 
business in the Packard factory. This early tutelage and I heir 
later experience is supplemented by continuous effort to improve 
every feature of the service departments of the Packard Com- 
pany and all Packard dealers. It is one of the most important 
parts of the Packard policy to give efficient service to owners 
everywhere. . 

* * * 

The Pioneer Automobile Company reports the following sales 
for the week ending July 10th: Thomas Flyers — 6-cylinder tour- 
ing car to A. W. Goodfellow, of Fresno; 6-cylinder Runabout to 
A. Sampler, Reno, Nevada; 4-cylinder touring car to A. F. 
Toomey, Oakland. Chalmers-] letroits — L. S. Short, Placerville, 
"80;" T. C. Van Ness. San Francisco, "40;" M. A. Wiles, San 
Jose, "30;" T. 11. Thomas, Redding, "30;" F. M. Lee, San 
Francisco, "30." Hudson runabouts — Mat Crossly, Oakland: 
1j. (). Tooley, San Francisco; James L. Wade, Oakland; Subur- 
ban, Electric Light and Power Co., San Leandro. 



Tips to Automobilists 

SAN FRANCISCO— Osen & Hunter Auto Co., 511 Golden Gate avenue 
Tel Market 2723. The San Francisco home of the "Mitchell Family." 

SAN FRANCISCO— Reed Electric Laboratories, 370 Golden Gate avenue. 
Tel. Franklin 4534. Electric repairing and sundries. Reed's electric 
lights for automobiles. Batteries repaired and recharged. 

14-MILE HOUSE — "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Automobile Supplies and re- 
pair shop. First class accommodations. Cuisine unsurpassed on the 
Coast. "Andy," formerly of the "Cliff House." 

OAKLAND— Osen & Hunter Auto Co., 1224 Webster street. Tel. Oah 
4076. The Oakland home of the "Mitchell Family." 

MAYFIELD— Reed Electric Works, on the road. Telephone Palo Alto 
593 R-I. Electric repairing and sundries. Batteries recharged. Gasoline 
and oils. Reed's electric lights for autos. 

SAN JOSE — Holsberg Bros., 246 W. Santa Clara (opposite Notre Dame 
Convent), upon entering town via S. F. road. Gasoline, oils, sundries and 
repairs. Seven passenger Thomas for hire. 

SAN JOSE — Osen & Hunter Auto Co., 1st and St. James Sts. Tel. 
Main 38. The San Jose home of the "Mitchell Family." 

SAN JOSE— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE. Market and St. James 
streets. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler and Regal agencies. 

SAN JOSE — San Jose Garage, 400 North First street, Blomdahl & 
Keller, Mgra. Renting, repairing and sundries. Agents for Goodyear 
tires. Phone Main 121. W. F. Hunt, agent for Chalmers-Detroit, 
Thomas, Buick and Olds. Phone Main 493. 

SAN JOSE.— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlor for ladies in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California, 76 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

GILROY, CAL. — George E. TIce, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service, 260 N. Mon- 
terey street. 

WATSONVILLE. — J. H. Covell Garage. Expert machine work, auto 
supplies, batteries recharged, gas engines repaired. Autos for hire day or 
night. Corner Main street and Lick avenue. 

SANTA CRUZ. — Pacific Garage, Hunt & Grlslngher. proprietors. Auto 
repairing and supplies. Cars for hire. Phone Main 222. 353-355 Pacific 
avenue, Santa Cruz. 

SAN JUAN. — Plaza Hotel — Headquarters for automobiles and tourists 
(special attention.) Opposite the old San Juan Bautlsta Mission, founded 
1797. Main road to Hotel Del Monte. A. H. BALDWIN. Prop. 

SANTA ROSA. — Occidental Hotel. Bane Bros., props. 4th and B Sta. 
European plan, $1.00 per day and up. American plan $2.60 per day and 
up. The most up-to-date hotel north of San Francisco. Cuisine unsur- 
passed. Two garages in connection. 

HEALDSBURG, CAL.— The Union Hotel. Wade H. Etter. Opposite 
the plaza. Special attention to auto parties. First class accommodations. 
Commodious garage. 



Keenan Bros. 



Automobile Engineer*, Machinist! and Blacksmith*. 



279 Valencia Street, 8an Franclico. 



Telephone Market 1986 



IGNITION 

TROUBLES 

AVOIDED 



Mr. C. S. Howard, of the Howard Automobile Company, left 
Thursday night for Los Angeles on b bi > a trip in connection 

with the branch in tin southern city of that well-known agency 

for Buick automob r California. Mr. Howard attended the -»*• -. . , 

trig 200 mile road ran', which was held on Saturday over the V UlCtHlIZlIl^ 
Santa Monica course, and in which he lias entered a Bnick 
"White Streak." 

* • • 

At Springfield, [llinois, the Buick won the record for the 
world on a circular track, Louis Strang driving. The o 

was on the staio Fail grounds on Sunday hist, and the time of 
52 minutes and t^ seconds was made on a fifty mile circular 
track. 'The former world's record was 53.45. 



and at less expense and inconven- 
ience to you than at present. Rent 
your batteries from Auto Ignition Co. 
709-711 Octavla St, Phone Market 5678. 



MARTLAND, PEART & ELKINGTON 



Phone Market 6370. 



42 Van Ness Avenue. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Paraiso Springs an' having a large run in automobile parties 

this season. \ no latest were Mr. and Mrs. Jai 

l-«'\rnsalcn. from Menio Park; Mr. and Mrs. 11. I.'. 1'' ■ 
Mr. and Mrs. Pieper, from 9 Joe Nolan anil Dr. ' 

party from San I'ran. 




1910 MODELS HAVE ARRIVED 

S. G. RAYL 

Northern California Representative 

583-591 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco. 



Durocar 



"Never anyone, anywhere will make 
a better one" 



//' I /i for (i Holder I 

Atlas was bearing the world on his - ; i.>;i : 
nates will soon relieve m>\" he cried. Herewith hi j.er it an- 
other shift. — N»W York <<un. 



Durocar Automobile Company 

of San Francisco 489 Golden Gate Avenue 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 



©if? SCtttg anb % (tasor 



Bt George Bernard Shaw. 

The censor has refused to grant a license for Mr. George Ber- 
nard Shaw's play, "The Showing-up of Blanco Posnet," which 
was to have been performed June 4th, at His Majesty's, 
London. 

"The decision whether a play is morally fit to be performed 
or not, rests 'vith the King absolutely, and I am not in the 
King's confidence. To write a play too vile for public perform- 
ance, even at the very indulgent standard applied to our Lon- 
don theatres, is as grave an offense as a man can commit, short 
of downright felony ; in fact, it is much worse than most felonies. 
To announce it for production at a theatre of high reputation 
is almost as bad. 1 presume the King would not hold up Mr. 
Tree and myself before Europe and America as guilty of this 
disgraceful conduct unless he had the most entire confidence 
in his own judgment or that of his advisers. The injury — not 
to mention the insult — to us is very considerable : but the dis- 
grace will depend on the extent to which the public shares the 
King's faith in this matter. It would be affectation for me to 
pretend to share it. 

"I shall allow the play to be performed in America and 
throughout Europe. I shall publish it. I should not do that if 
I shared the King's opinion of it. I have far more at stake 
than any one else concerned ; for I should be ruined if I lost 
the confidence of the public in my honor and conscience as a 
playwright, as I have no following among vicious or thought- 
less people. 

What the Play Is. 

"I repeat, I do not know why the play has been declared unfit 
to exist. It is a very simple and even crude melodrama, with ab- 
solutely no sexual interest whatever. It represents a little com- 
munity of violent, cruel, sensual, ignorant, blasphemous, blood- 
thirsty backwoodsmen, whose conception of manliness is mere 
brute pugnacity and whose favorite sport is lynching. Into this 
welter of crude newspaperized savagery there suddenly comes a 
force — not mentioned in 'The Merry Widow' — to which they 
give the name of God, the slightest regard for which they make 
it a point of honor to despise as mere weakness of character. 
That force nevertheless, at the crisis which is the subject of the 
drama, makes them do its will and not their own in a manner 
very amazing to themselves; and, I should hope, not altogether 
unedifying to the spectators. I am given to understand that 
the introduction of this force into my play as a substitute for 
the simple cupidities and concupiscences of 'The Merry Widow,' 
is the feature that renders the play unfit for performance. It was 
precisely the feature which made the play worth writing to me. 
What is called the struggle of a man with God is the most dra- 
matic of all conflicts; in fact, the only one that makes really 
good drama. But our royal rule is that conflict with God cannot 
be permitted on the stage. Except when the name of God is 
taken altogether in vain, by way of swearing, -the Divine An- 
tagonist must be spoken of, even by the most hardened and sav- 
age outlaws, with the decorum and devotional respect observed 
by our Bishops. 

"Well, my hero had to shoot out his lip and wag his head. He 
went to his salvation as St. Paul did, kicking against the pricks, 
and not at all as Mr. Pecksniff went to his damnation. And that, 
I understand, is why the King will not allow him to be exhibited 
on the stage in England. He could have been seduced by 'The 
Merry Widow' with impunity." 



The eyes of the city folk are turned to the country. All 

of San Francisco and Oakland has turned to the woods and the 
streams. Everybody that can afford it is in the country, and 
who is there that cannot take a day off to cheat the doctor ? The 
Ellery Arms Co., of 48-52 Geary street, have been doing a "land 
office business" in clothing for' outing, and in the sale of camping 
supplies of all descriptions. Here one may secure good fishing 
tackle, guns and athletic goods of all variety, and here one may 
outfit for the simple trip to the classic shades of Tamalpais or 
for an extended tour through Alaska. To enjoy sport thoroughly 
one must be dressed for it, and it is a duty to ensure perfect, 
pleasure in sport to have every necessity provided that man can 
devise. The Ellery Arms Company is the place. 



1 — "■ 


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11 1 


1 




1 




A MINT JULEP 
OF 




= 


HUNTER. 

BALTIMORE 


= 


1 


RYE 


1 


1 


IS A DRAUGHT OF COOL REFRESHMENT 
THE DAINTIEST SIP THAT PASSES LIP 

HENRY CAMPB & CO.. INC., 

Distributors for California and Nevada. 

San Francisco, Cal. 


1 




11111111 




1 . 


iiiiiiii 


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1 — II- 


II MM II 


II ' 



Rockaway Beach 



SAN MATEO CO. 



FOR SALE AT A SACRIFICE 

5 CHOICE LOTS FOR $750 CASH 



Apply room 16, San Francisco News Letter, 
773 Market Street, San Francisco 



Goodyear "Hippo" Hose 




B,-s( and Wrongest Garden Hose 
Stand 600 lbs. pressure. Any length 

Goodyear Rubber Company 

R. H. PEASE. President, 

587, 589. 591 Market Street 



White Diamond Water Co. 



Incorporated 



Pure Wiler for Oakland 
Alameda 
Berkeley 



An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 
treated, but bacteriologically purified by electrical process 6 gallons 
DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK, $1.50 per month. Single 5 gallon 
bottle, 50 cents. 



Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 4192, 



980 45th Street 



R. Bujannoff 

MANUFACTURING JEWELER 

AND 

DIAMOND SETTER 

51 LICK PLACE, off Sutter, between Kearny and Montgomery 




Phone. Doogfas 1833. 






July 17, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



33 



AN ORIENTAL ON FIFTY DOLLARS PER ANNUM. 

One Gates, who is credited with"having done a great deal of 
good work as charity officer, on scientific principles, and who 
has prison reform as a hobby, has branched put in a new line. 

In the course of an interview in the East he has made the state- 
ment that the Oriental can live in California on fifty dollars a 
year. There are a thousand or more Chinamen in Chinatown, 
and several thousand Japanese in various walks of life in the 
State of California who will gladly pay Mr. Gates fifty 'dollars a 
3 r ear for the recipe if he will part with it. 

Mr. Gates' argument runs in this wise : The Oriental comes to 
the United States in large numbers, expecting to find work. 
When he gets here, he finds that there is no work, so he sets 
about to do the work there is not, for less money than the white 
man undertakes to do it for. He thus throws the white man out 
of the labor market as a bidder for the work .which does not exist, 
and, after having corraled all the work which is fiction, he imme- 
diately raises his price so high that the white owner cannot afford 
to pay him for the work which he does not do, but for which he 
has been paid a low wage heretofore for not doing, and then the 
white owner of the laundry and the ranch gets tired and sells him 
the ranch and then the Oriental goes into the ranch business him- 
self, and he corrals all the labor there is not and charges for it 
an increased price, which is the equivalent of what the white man 
would demand for doing it, and then some, providing the work 
were there to do which it is not. Hence, hard times, labor dis- 
satisfaction on the Pacific Coast, and our prisons are full to over- 
flowing. 

Mr. Gates continues by making the ease still stronger against 
the Oriental by the further allegation that the Japanese is so 
thrifty that he does not drink himself to death ; he does not inter- 
fere with his rivals politically or otherwise, allowing his labor on 
the jobs which do not exist to tell the story. The Chinese is much 
the same. He is horribly immoral, he keeps to himself, and he 
has nothing to do with our women: he saves his earnings and oc- 
casionally sends money away. He insists upon working as a 
house servant when there reaily is no work then 1 to do, and where 
the house-holder foolishly pays him a really larger salary. It's 
the strangest kind of a world out here! According to Mr. Gates 
the non-assimilation of the Chinese is a monstrous thing, and jrel 
the occasional marriage of a while woman with a Japanese or a 
Chinaman, or the mating of a wiiite man with a Japanese woman, 
is a freaky circumstance and cannot be condoned, beeau 
races should have kept to themselves. 

We all know that Mr. dales mual be right, because be Bays he 
is. It is quite evident he ought, to know. lu\ tng Bpenl thi 
part of his life studying racial conditio! on the Pacific Coasl in 
the Minnesota penal institutions, and while working the Vi- 
olated Charities. Mr. Gales is a noted penologist, and, as am h. 
must know many things about prune and apricol picking and 
packing which has simply passed by the average California 
rancher, and his deductions must be aci spti $ as final, for he has 
studied the whole subject of labor on the Pacific Coast for at 
least two years. Of course, the men on the Coast who have had 
this question before them for many years, and who have seen 
crops rot on the ground until the advent of the Oriental, arc 
afflicted with limited intelligences. The hop man who finds him- 
self face to face with ruin, unless he can gel the assistance of an 
Oriental crew, is a rei man. lie should join in a cor- 

respondence class with Mr. Gates as preceptor, and sa\e himself 
much loss of money and fearful mental tribulation. 



Saved. 

Chug-chug I Br-rl br-r-r! lion-honk ' Qiggigillup-gilligi- 
Lugl 

The pedestrian paused at the intersection of two busj 

Be looked about. An automobile was rushing at him from 
one direction, a motorcycle from another; an auto-truck was 
from behind, and a taxicab was speedily approaching. 
Zip-Zip! Zing-glug! 

lie looked up. and saw di recti j above him a runaway airship 
in rapid descent. 

There was but one chance. He was standing upon a manhole 
Quickly seising it, he lifted the lid and jump 
>t in time to be run ovet 
Plain Dealer. 



FOR CLEANING AND POLISHING:- 

Every bright house wile concedes: 
It's everything that Silver needs. 

ELECTRO 
SILICON 

Test it yourself. 

Wesupply FREE SAMPLE for the asking. 

' Full-sized box, post-paid, 15 cts. in stamps. 

The Electro Silicon Co. , 30 Cliff St. . New York. 

Sold by Grocers and Druggists. 



I 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronson, Notary Public, 2C04 Sutter street, corner Fillmore 
street. All legal papers drawn up accurately. Phone West 3016. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavia. Telephone Fell 9911. 

DENTISTS. 
D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 



W. A. Bryant, M. C 
tation hours: 10 a. rr 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevius, Dentist. 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Formerly of James Flood Building, 814 Eddy 



ATTORNEYS- AT- LAW. 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Tel. Douglas 2176. ■ 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Drs. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Rlegelhaupt, Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly 
of 6 Geary street, remove corns entirely whole; painless, without knife. 
Bunions and in-growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 
205-206 Westbank Building", 830 Market street, San Francisco. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES. 

People's Express Company. Baggage checked to all parts of the United 
States at the hotels and residences in Oakland. Alameda and Berkeley. 
Special attention to trans-bay baggage. Phones Oakland 4417; Alameda 
456; Berkeley 14; San Francisco, Kearny 579. 



Plan to Visit 

Yosemite Valley 

OPEN ALL YEAR 

An Ideal Place to Spend 
Your Vacation 



Surroundings perfect for rest and recreation 
Good Hotels. Camps. Private Camping. Ev 
penses reduced to popular prices. 



NOW REACHED BY RAH \ QUICK, COMFORTABLE TRIP. Take Southern 
Pacific or Santa Fe to Merced. A scenic ride through the Merced Canyon. Three hours 
and a half by si age through the Park. Ask for descriptive folder, giving details. 



O. W. LEHMER, Traffic Mgr., Merced, Cal. 




ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
Savage Gold and Silver Mining Company 

Location of principal place of business. San Francisco. California. Location of workt. 
Virginia Mining District. Storey County. Slate of Nevada 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting or me Board of Directors held on the ajd day 
of June. iqoq. an assessmen- ent*. pat share was levied upon the 

capital stock of the corporation, payable immediate!* in L'nitei Mates gold coin, to the 
secretary at the office of the company, room 116, No. j$q Bush St., San Francisco. Calif. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 28th day of July, 
i.voy. will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment 
Is made before, will be soli on WEDNESDAY, the iSth day of Aug., iqOg.to pay the delin- 
quent assessment, together with the cost of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By ordtr of the Board of Dm JOHN W. TWIGGS. Secretary. 

Office: Room ri6. No. jj9 Bush Street. San Francisco. Ca*fomla. 



Brushes 



Back to our old location 623 Sacramento Street between 
Kearny and Montgomery Streets 

With full line of Brushes. Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 
to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Bucket*. Chamois. 
Metal Polish, and Cleaning Powders. Hardware, Wood and Willow Ware. 
Call, write or telephone Kearny 

Wm. Buchanan 



ALFRED BANNISTER 

ACCOUNTANT AND AUDITOR 



1424 Post Street 
Public Expert 



San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 2871 



34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 



BANKING 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO 
B. E. WALKER, President 

ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager 



ESTABLISHED 1867 



Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 6,000,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are is- 
sued in denominations of 

$10, $20, $50, $100, and $200 
and the exact amount payable in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland is stated on the face of each cheque, while in other countries 
they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

San Francisco Office — California and Sansome Streets. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
526 California Street, San Francisco, California. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1.000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,504,498.68 

Deposits. June 30, 1909 36,793,234.04 

Total Assets 39,435,681.38 

Remittance may be made by Draft, Post Office or Wells. Fargo & Co.'s 
money orders, or coin by express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock m., and Saturday evenings from 7 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock p. in. 
for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; 
Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant 
Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secre- 
tary, A. H. Muller; Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, Ign. 
Steinhardt, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse, 
and W. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission street, between 21st and 22d street. 
For receipt and payment of deposits only. C. W. Heyer, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 432 Clement St., between 5th and 6th 
avenues. For receipt and payment of Deposits only. W. C. Hever, man- 
ager. 

Central Tm£ Company of California 

Market and Sansome Sts. Branches 3039 16th St.; 624 Van Ness Avenue. 

Accounts of individuals, firms, corporations, unions, societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts. Drafts sold on all parts of the world. 
Capital paid in, $1,500,000. Surplus, $100,000. 

B. G. TOGNAZZI, Manager. 



French Savings Bank 



108 SUTTER ST., NEAR MONTGOMERY. 

Paid-up Capital $600,000 

Total Assets $4,270,800 

Strictly a savings bank. Open Saturday evenings from 7 to 8:30. 

OFFICERS— Charles Carpy, President; Arthur J_,egallet. First Vice- 
President; Leon Bocqueraz, Second Vice-President; A. Bousquet, Secre- 
tary; A. Bergerot, Attorney. 

DIRECTORS — N. C. Babin, J. A. Bergerot, O. Bozio, Charles Carpy, 
Arthur Legallet, G. Beleney, H. de St. Seine, J. M. Dupas, Leon Boc- 
queraz, J. E. Artlgues, J. S. Godeau, John Ginty. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT. 

The French-American Bank occupies offices in the same building. 

Italian-American Bank 

S. E. Corner Montgomery and Sacramento Sts. 

Paid-up Capital $750,000 

Surplus 210,000.00 

Conduct general banking business. Dealers in foreign exchange. 
Officers — A. Sbarboro, President; A. E. Sbarboro, Cashier; H. J. 
Crocker, Vice-President; R. A. Sbarboro, Assistant Cashier. 

Anglo and London Paris National Bank 

N. E. CORNER SANSOME AND PINE STREETS. 



Capital, $4,000,000. 



Surplus, 



1.350,000 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, President; H. FLBISHHACKER, Vice-President 
and Manager; J. FRIEDLANDER, Vice-President; C. P. HUNT, Vice- 
President; R. AXTSCHTJL, Cashier; A. HOCHSTEIN, Assistant Cashier; 
F. E. BECK, Assistant Cashier. 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit, available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 

"A FAIR FACE MAY PROVE A FOUL BAR- 
GAIN." MARRY A PLAIN GIRL IF SHE USES 

SAPOLIO 




Not a Warrior Bold. 

"As I entered the stateroom assigned to me I was startled to 
find the lower berth littered with feminine apparel, - ' said a com- 
mercial traveler. "I immediately sought out the purser of the 
boat and told him he must have made some mistake in allotting 
the rooms. 'Well,' he exclaimed, 'there must be some mistake. 
Let's look at the passenger list.' Examination- of the list showed 
my name and that of Major White as the occupants of the same 
room. The purser and I went to the stateroom, and there in 
the doorway stood a mildeyed young woman. When the purser 
asked her if that was her room she glanced at him casually and 
replied that it was. 'I have assigned this room to Major White. 
Have I the pleasure of speaking to his wife?' 'No, sir, I am 
Major White — Major White of the Salvation Army.' " — Satur- 
day night. 



In Fig Season. 

"I have here an opera," announced the robust composer, 
"which will be the greatest production of the century. It is 
called 'Paradise.' " " 'Paradise !' " roared the impresario; "man, 
do you realize that it would cost for scenery?" "Yes,"' answered 
the composer calmly, "but do you realize what would be saved on 
costumes ?" — Town Topics. 



Arranging for Mother. 

Widow — Do you know that my daughter has set her eyes 

on you. Gentleman (flattered) — Has she, really? Widow — 
Certainly. Only to-day she was saying, "That's the sort of gen- 
tleman I should like for my papa." — Exchange. 

The Passing Years. 

Miss Elderleigh — Jane Jones is a mean, spiteful old cat. Miss 
Younger — What's the matter ? Miss Elderleigh — I told her that 
my family came over in the Mayflower, and she asked me if I 
was seasick. — Exchange. 



Breaking it Gently. 

Jack — Perhaps you don't like my style of dancing. Orme (in 
distress) —Well, there is rather too much sameness about it. 
Jack — Er — How may L vary it. Oime — Suppose you tread on 
my left foot once in a while. — Exchange. 



Great Head. 

Mrs. Kicker — If you are going to another one of those ban- 
quets, I don't suppose you will know the number of the house 
when you get back. Mr. Kicker — Oh, yes, I will ; I unscrewed 
it from the door and am taking it with me. — Kansas City Jour. 



Domestic Scheme. 

Mrs. II. — AVhy are you so very fond of Oriental rugs? Mrs. M. 
— I'll tell you a secret. The dirtier they get, the more genuine 
they look. You've no idea how much sweeping that saves. — 
( 'Irreliiiiil I'lnin Dealer. 



The Moth. 

Checkers — Years ago I had money to burn and 1 burned it. 
Neckers — How? Checkers — On an old flame of mine. — Lippin- 

cott's. 



"Mildred," called her father from the head of the atairs, 

"is that young man an auctioneer?" "Why, no, father." "lie 
talks like one. He's been putting up that 'going' bluff Eor forty 
minutes and has only got as far as the door." — Kansas City 

Tim ex. 



Maudie's papa is a night editor on a newspaper — a fact 

which Maudie apparently hasn't learned, for when some one 
asked her a few days ago what her father did for a living, she 
replied: "I div it up. I dess he's a burglar, 'tause he's mit all 
night." — Exchange. 



.Ti i.v IT. 1909 



and California Advertiser 



35 



MOTS llmririhlr. 

"T was treading an — aw — account of a woman being gored to 
death by a beastly cow, doncherknow," remarked young Dud- 
leigh. "Weally, I cawn'i imagine a more howwible affair, can 
you. Miss Caustique?" "No, Mr. Dudleigh," replied Miss Caus- 
tique, with a mighty yawn, "unless it is being bored to death by 
a calf." — Exchange. 



For three weeks he had borne all the horrors of spring 

cleaning without a murmur. Then his patience gave way. "And 
you." sobbed his wife, "you used to tell me I was your queen." 
"Ves." he said, with a wild glare in his eyes; "but when a man 
finds his queen has used his best tobacco jar for pale oak varnish 
and his meerschaum pipe for a tack hammer, he begins to 
grasp the advantages of a republic." — Tit-Bits. 



Isaac (who has just recovered from typhoid) — Doctor, 

you have charged me for four weeks' calls; I vill pay for only 
three weeks ! Doctor — But I called on you every day for four 
weeks, Mr. Isaac. Isaac — Veil, dere was one week I was delir- 
ious, and I didn't see you come in ! — Tit-Bits. 



Little Harvey — Mamma, has your tongue got feet? 

Mamma — Of course not. What made. you ask such a silly ques- 
tion? Little Harvey — I heard papa say your tongue was run- 
ning all day long, and I wondered how it could run without feet. 
— Exchange. 



"Yes, [ was once engaged to a duke." "And what fell 

fate came between two loving hearts?" "Oh, nothing," said 
the girl nonchalantly. "We just let the option expire." — Kansas 
City Journal. 



Promptness is a characteristic of the Spaulding Carpet 

Cleaning Company. Thoroughness is another, and the housewife 
who entrusts her rugs or carpets to this firm is a walking adver- 
tisement of its efficiency. Every quality that goes to ensure an 
ever-increasing patronage is the practice of this reliable house. 




THE FORUM CAFE 



o 



K 



N D 



Now under the management of 

MR. GUSTAV MANN 



Castle Crags Farm 

Shasta County, California 

A LOG CABIN COLONY. At the foot of the Crags and 
adjacent to Mount Shasta. Wholesome home cook- 
ing, hot and cold water, shower baths in every cabin. 
New assembly hall. Fine fishing and hunting. Under 
the management of Mrs. W. F. Morris, formerly of 
Hotel Cecil, San Francisco. 

For rates and reservations address Mrs. Morris at Hotel Victoria. 
San Fran, 



Campers to Yosemite Valley 

can be supplied with tents, complete camping outfits and all kinds 

of provisions at the Yosemite Valley Store. Parties outfitted for 

Sierra trips. Rates reasonable. Nelson L. Salter. Proprietor. 



June Fishing Always Best. 
Remarkably Warm June Weather. 



Tallac 

and 

Brockway 



The resorts that have made Lake Tahoe famous for its fishing 
and scenery. 

Brockway at the northern end of the Lake always famous for its 
fishing, and having the only hot springs, which are a wonder In 
themselves and the curative properties of the waters. 

Tallac, at the southern end of the Lake, is noted for its natural 
advantages and location. 

Surrounded by innumerable small lakes and streams stocked 
with several varieties of trout make it the delight of the rod fisher- 
men. All within easy walking, riding or driving distance. 

Hotel and cottages steam heated and electric lights; boats, 
launches and livery under hotel management. Our specialty — 
Finest of milk, cream and butter. 

Information Peck-Judah Company, 783 Market, Southern Pacific 
Information Bureau, Lawrence & Corns tock, Tallac and Brock- 
way. 




130 M ILES 
PERFECT ROADS 



Highland SPRINGS 



Auto Stage from Pieta 75 minutes. 

150 Rooms. Electric lights. 30 mineral spring's. Wonderfully 

curative. 

Unsurpassed cuisine. Complete garage and automobile supplies. 

NEW MANAGEMENT. For reservations an J further particulars address 

P F KOHNKB, Lmmt and Manager 

C . E . ZINKAND. Assistant Manager 
or Peck Judah Information Bureau. 789 Markn Sneel, San Franrisro. 




AMERICAS GREATEST 

HEALTH AND 

PLEASURE RESORT. 



Positive cure for rheumatism anil stomach trouble. Table first- 
class. The roads have been put in excellent shape for staging and 
autos. Rates. $12 to $!i Baths free to guests. For fur- 

ther reticulars address R ft Ct_'RRY\ Proprietor. The Geysers. 
California. 

Notice — All guests remaining two weeks and under four will 
be refunded their fare on-? way. and guests remaining four weeks 
and longer will be refunded round trip far* from San Francisco. 



Santa Cruz 



Welcomes automobilisis and excursionists and those 
seeking recreation for their summer vacations. Band 
concerts, dancing, bathing and boating every afternoon 
and evening. 



36 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 17, 1909 




ON THE DEATH OF SWINBURNE. 

He trral the earth but yesterday, 
And now he treads tli • stars. 

He left ns in the April-time 

lie praised so often in his rhyme; 
He left the singing and the lyre ami went his way. 

He drew new music from our tongue, 
A music subtly wrought, 

And molded words to his desire 
As wind doth mold a wave of fire; 
From strangely fashioned harps slow, golden tones he 
wrung. 

I think the singing understands 
That lie who sang is still. 

And Iseult cries that he is dead — • 

Does not Dolores bow her head 
And Fragoletta weep and wring her little hands? 

Xew singing now the singer hears 

To lyre and lute and harp. 

Catullus waits to welcome him. 

And through the twilight sweet and dim 

Sappho's forgotten songs are falling on his ears. 

— Sfini Teasdale in St. Louis Mirror. 




Ehrman Bros. & Co., Distributors 

Phone Kearny 3872 134-136-138 Front St.. San Francisco 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone, Douglas 4300 



FUTURITY. 

My youth to me was like a lovely flower. 

AM Hushed with crimson id' its own delight, 
Its flame-like petals poised as if for flight. 

Ethereal child of changing sun and shower, 
Of misty dawn and night. 

My age to me is like a golden fruit 

Whose quality and sweetness have been won 
From earth's rough use — from alternating sun 

And rain and that dark soil wherein my root 
Invisibly has run. 

My soul to me is like a ripening seed 

Which holds thi' heart of all that went before — 
The flame-like flower ami golden fruit in store. 

Close-sealed, secure, in larger love and deed 
To live and bloom once more. 

— Helm A. Saxon in Appleton's Magazine. 




Phone 
Franklin 2803 

Art and Refine- 
menl are Dis- 
played by Taste- 
ful Attire 

-MAKERS OF-- 



LADIES' GOWNS and FANCY COSTUMES 



1321 SUTTER STREET. Near Van Ness Ave. 



San Francisco, Cat 



Spring Styles 

Your inspection is invited to the most, 
complete and heSt assortment of 

Spring and Summer Cloths • 

EVER SHOWN IN THIS CITY 



Suits from 
Overcoats from 
Trousers from 



S2S.50 up 
S22.50 up 
S 5. 60 up 



Chas. Lyons 



771 Market Street 



LONDON TAILOR 

At Our Three Complete Stores 



1432 Fillmore Street 



958 Broadway. Oakland 



THE ULTIMATE VISION. 

One lost within a wood and wandering far 

Broke through the darkness, heedless where he unit. 
Having no hope ; but as aside he bent 

The branches, careless of their blackened sear, 

There, full before him, perpendicular. 

The ground fell from him in a long descent 
Unto a water, where the firmament 

bay spread beneath him, endless, star on star. 

M wanderer within life's wasted ways 

Where heaven's fires are hidden from thy sight. 

Toiling within a wilderness of days. 

Struggling with hands that reach against the night. 

Take heart; thou, too. shalt stand with steady gaze 
And look upon unending world's of light. 

— Rhys Carpenter. 



MAYERLE'S GERMAN EYEWATER IS 

inple and perfectly harmless Eye Remedy, for children and 

OFFICE CH IEF OF POLICE. Son Francisco —It gives me groat pleas- 
ure to recommend to the public Mr. George Hayerlo of 960 Market St , 
' San Francisco 1 have been using glasses for the past twelve year* 
and during that time bavo consulted several opticians, but not until I 
had consulted Mr. George Mayerle and hid him fit glasses to my eyes 
did 1 get entire satisfaction. Most ro»poclful)y. 

J H. ANDERSON, Sergeant of Police 
IT IS MARVELOUS. The effect of Mayorle's Eye Water has been 
marvelous and I shall recommend it as the peer of all eye remedies. 
Yours truly, P. KELLY, Alameda County Hospital. San Leandro. Cat. 

-adnate German Esperl Optician, charter member American 
Association of Opticians. 9'lfl Market Street, opposite Halo's 
) Franklin 3270, San Francisco. MAYERLE'S GERMAN EYE WiTER. By Mai). 8Sc. 




George Mayerle 



WEDDING PRESENTS. 
The choicest variety to select from at Marsh's, corner Cali- 
fornia and Polk streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



COAJL To Housekeepers 



Please remember when ordering your coal, if you want the 
GENUINE CLEAN RICHMOND COAL at wholesale prices 
and full weight, you must order from or through us. We 
deliver in any part of the city or country in sacks or in bulk. 



J. J. Moore & Co. 



225-233 PINE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

Phones Kearny 466 and Kearny 465 




sjApb^^a . 



^*»-:'"'iTl «'■■-. 















^■it* *r 






EST- 









^ ji. 



«" *i«k«W» 



»sr- . -^T 



i2L 



•VIEW OF HONOLULU, FROM THE PUNCHBOWL. 




A PART OF HONOLULU'S HARBOR 



-From July Overland Monthly. 



LOW RATES 
TO 



Alaska- Yukon - Pacific 

Exposition 



FOR ROUND TRIP TICKETS 


FROM 




SAN FRANCISCO 


$32.50 


SACRAMENTO 


32.50 


LATHROP 


32.50 


STOCKTON 


32.50 


TRACY 


32.50 


SUISUN 


32.50 


DAVIS 


32.50 


NAPA 


32.75 


SANTA ROSA 


33.60 


CALISTOGA 


33.95 



Greatly reduced rates from other points in California. Tickets sold 

daily until September 30, and cover two months' trip going 

and coming via the famous 

Shasta Route 

of the 

Southern Pacific 



Stopovers going and coming. Many other routes at slightly higher 
rates for you to select from. 

Write or call on our nearest agent for full details of service, etc. 
or address 

FLOOD BUILDING for information 





. DON'T BY ANY CHANCE OVERLOOK 






Overland Monthly for August 






THE GREAT VACATION MAGAZINE 






OPENING OF THE FLATHEAD RESERVATION 

With Illustrations 

ROBBING FOG OF ITS TERRORS 

With Illustrations 

VAN DYKE'S "HOUSE OF RIMMON" IN THE 
GREEK THEATRE 

With Illustrations, 


< 















Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. LXXV1II 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 24, 1909 



No. 4 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. Fred- 
erick Marriott. 773 Market St, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway. C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



Japan's income tax takes about all a fellow earns. War 

preparations come high. 

Where are the Doodle-Dees, with their list of aspiring 

geniuses for city offices? 

Notwithstanding the Taft club, Cannon and Aldrich re- 
fuse to quit the employ of the trusts. The job must pay well. 

The United States Senate seems to be in doubt about two 

things — the size of Taft's club, and if he would strike if crossed 
too much. 

Candidates should not wear red badges on primary elec- 
tion day. They might be taken for an army of anarchists. There 
are so many of them. 

Langdon does not seem able to conceal his disgust for the 

whole graft business. Well, then, let him wipe off tin' slate be- 
fore he steps down and out. 

The way of the man who transgresses the laws of sound 

and honest hanking is hard, especially when he tries to even 
up things by committing suicide. 

And while about the business of brushing up the streets. 

will the Down Town Improvement Club please have those hide- 
ous billboard monstrosities removed? 

The relies of a New York suicide are on sale. and. of 

course, there an- bidders for the grewsome stuff. \m 
variety of queer folk is very complete, 

At this stage of the game, il becomes important to know 

if the Washington and Sun Fran isco Governments are to pay 
candidate Reney's campaign expens 

Who said Taft had no backbone! Be seems to have one 

made of chrome steel, hut more is the pity that he did not put it 
on exhibition before Congress two months ago. 

The Good Government League's explanation of those 

mystic marks Fully explains all about a piece of bungling detec- 
tive work to ''dog tin- steps" of reputable citizens. 

— — That i.'oi., 1 Government League & • i» league 

against itself. Every man should he a good Government league 
of and in and by himself. That's good citizenship. 

An apartment house capitalized at $1,500,000 fo 

Francisco. 1: will make splendid homes, but as a place for rear- 
ing children, a eahin in the woods beats it a thousand to one. 

The latest politico-social fad in the Ea^f is for your girl 

to refuse to marry you unless TOO promise to vote for woman's 
suffrage. Hut who will suffer most if the plan is enforced? 

The deposed Shah of Persia refuses to receive a delega- 
tion to tell him that he is officially dead as a ruler. Tie says he 
is aware of the fact, and does not wish to have it rubhed in. 

About 360 pounds of avoirdupois and a barrel of gray 

matter have joined hands against upward revision with 
at the end of a sharp stick. Something • • happen. 

Xo mailer what did it. hut the fact that ••mother" Eddy 

has just started in on the eighty-ninth mile of her life's journey 
.is a firm hold on =ome brand of a good t ! 



There may be no place for free hides in the Aldrich 

schedule, but there will be plenty of tanned hides on Taft's 
political clothes-line if a lot of Congressmen do not mend their 
ways. 

All the way from Paris comes the shocking story that 

George Gould's daughter is likely to marry Anna Gould's cast- 
off husband, Count Boni. Has the Gould family a particular 
code of ethics, too. 

It is not particularly encouraging for the political future 

of San Francisco to see two hundred men scrambling for thirty- 
one public offices, especially when every candidate is armed with 
a mud-shooting gun. 

"Greed, graft and pull" is back of the upward revision, 

says La Follette, and the Wisconsin man is a pretty well posted 
individual. But wait for the political judgment day when the 
people are in the saddle. 

No doubt Roosevelt is whispering "then I'll come back" in 

far-off Africa, which his friends at home believe to mean trouble 
later on for our Cannons and our Ahlriehs. But why commence 
stirring things right now? 

Because his congregation would rather attend theatres 

than hear him preach. Reverend Croft, of Denver, prop" 
hunt for other pastures. Why not? Why not he sensational in 
the pulpit, or get an affinity? 

Perhaps the President did not intend to hand Congress- 
man Hayes a lemon at thai conference, but H looks and smells 
like one — one that was sadly in need of more high protection 
from the sting of ridicule. 

The presenl session of Congress will go down in history 

as a misfit, also as showing how a few conspirators may over 
ride the expressed will of the people. But so Ear as known, no 
member has forgotten to draw his salary. 

A Mrs. Johnson wants a divorce because her husband in- 
dulges in hallucinations. 'I he supp 
that that ailment belongs wholly in the ante-matrimi 
and that it passes away <oon after main 

Evelyn Thaw tells the court tl es up to her own 

particular code of ethics. It is the same code tie 

of horns, a forked tail and red clothing introduced infc 

world many ages ago, and his school-h 

for pupils. 

Congressman Payne says an income tax would make us 

a nation of liars because no man would tell the truth about the 
size of his income. Experience is often a good schoolmaster, es- 
pecially when biding behind perjury,* which enables one to talk 
by the book. 

Months ago the office of the District Attorney passed into 

the hands of a corps of assistant!), but Langdon still has the 
power to undo his -tatf- reekle- foolishness hy dismissing so- 
called . - And it is his duty to leave his office clear of 
even the smell of the farce. 

Because the saloons and rooming' houses and restaurants 

of Oakland are clamoring for the resumption 
gambling at Emeryville, it does not mean that public sentiment 
land has degenerated to that low level. Keep that fact 
in mind. 

Just think of it ! About 800 patriots are ready to suffer 

in mind and bodv and pocket-book to serve the city in public 
■f which there will be some thirty-one to fill ! There may 
be some doubts as to the quality, but none as to the quantity of 
this display of love of country. 




Mr. Calhoun is again on trial for 
Clear the Calendar, the same old alleged offense, but a 
new Supervisor is named as the ob- 
jective point of the prosecution. The beaten path is to lie trod, 
ami substantially the evidence hitherto submitted will be pre- 
sented to the jury, with no more reason to expect any resull other 
than the prosecution has already worn threadbare. How many 
weeks or months will In- spent in securing a jury remains to be 

seen, hut there is no reason to expert that this trial ran I S- 

pedited any faster than the previous hearings. Bui the mills 
must do their grinding. When a man grabs a hear by the tail 
il is often the ease that he is reluctant to let g0 3 lest a worse 
lair hcfall him. 

It was the duty of District Attorney Langdon to heed the re- 
ports and rumors of "grafting" and kindred corrupt practices 
of the Schmitz administration, especially by the Board of Super- 
visors and lay all the farts obtainable before the Grand -lury. 
and ii was Ids duty to urge indictments in eases where the evi- 
dence seemed to justify prosecution. lie took hold of the prose- 

CUtion with vigor and left no stone unturned whose turning was 
likely to reveal intentional or actually committed crime, noi 
only by officials of the municipality, hut by individuals ot cor- 
porations in conjunction with them. By adroit strategy, he ran 
certain Supervisors into a corner, from which there was no es- 
cape from the penitentiary other than by making a full confess 
-ion of their guilt and agreeing to testify to all the facts. In 
consideration of the promised revelations, the District Attorney 
thoughl it the wiser course to pursue in unearthing the ins and 
outs of crime to gran! immunity from personal prosecution to 
those who had confessed ami agreed to supply the then missing 
ink whirli was supposed to firmly and positively connect named 
private citizens and corporations with the crimes to which the 
indicted Supervisors had confessed to be guilty of as charged. 

The question of whether the District Attorney acted wisely in 
granting immunity to the confessed criminals, or rather i- ii 
ever wise lo condone the crime of a criminal as compensation 
for betraying bis pals, ha- always been an open one, because 
ii I- held by the bench and har and the public generally that a 
man who would involve Ids partner or partners to save himself 

is utterly untrustworthy of belief and his testimony useless 
unless distinctly corroborated. In the case of the confessed 
Supervisors, tl is clear from their testimony that they deliher- 
ately lied to the District Attorney when they said they would 
reveal the names of ami identify those who bribed them. They 
confessed to having been bribed and nai 1 the amount of 

money received by each, and when and how. but they all swore 

that (In- transactions were conducted by their accredited agent, 
who presumably was also the accredited agent of the alleged 
bribe givers, hut not one of them even attempted to identify a 
human being on earth as the one who furnished tin- money that 
subsequently found its way to their pockets. But as to who 
bribed them, except by suspicion, the confessed Supervisors and 
the District Attorney are in absolute legal ignorance and dark- 
ness. 

These things being true, and known to he true by every citi- 
zen of San Francisco, and of all the world, too. for that matter, 
what is the duty of District Attorney Langdon in the premises? 
What is his duty after nearly three years of the most painstak- 
ing labor to secure evidence that would convict the alleged 
bribe-givers and having utterly failed at every point? Whai LS 
his duly to the city and county of San Francisco after such 
large expenditures of money and time to accomplish what is 
clearly impossible of .accomplishment;-' Clearly it is to nolle, 
prosequi every case in which the laic Board of Supervisors have 
been relied upon to establish the facts of the alleged bribery, for 
if they have any knowledge of the BOUXce of the money with 
which they were bribed, they refuse to give the in format ion. 
thus leaving the prosecution helpless. Without the slightest 



reflection upon the District Attorney's loyalty to the trust com- 
mitted to his keeping or upon his ability to conduct his office 
forcefully, public sentiment is thai an end should be put to the 
whole business by dismissing the indictments. In fact, any 
further effort to accomplish the impossible would impress the 
public as being persecution, prompted by personal spite, of which 

no - suspects District Attorney Langdon capable. But after 

having exhausted every moan- of locating evidence of the guilt. 
as charged, of the several defendants, the dignity and good 
name of San Francisco insists that further prosecution would 
In- persecution and spite work. Can District Attorney Lang- 
don afford to leave his office under the shadow of such a sus- 
picion?' IDs allies, the self-confessed Supervisors, betrayed him. 
They lied to him when they promised convicting evidence. 



If the Down Town' Improvement 
Clean the Streets. Club would eschew politics and make 

a tour of inspection of the Btreets, 

perhaps it would he awakened to its real mission in the public 
concerns of the city — unless it deems the accumulation of dusl 
ami store sweepings an . improvement, and ornamental to the 

■ : nghfares. Aside from tin- great damage to stocks of goods 

and wares on display in the stores by reason of dust clouds sweep- 
ing in upon them, the journey from store to store, if hoi hazard- 
ous, i- beset at every step with whirling sand and dirt, which the 
winds pick up hen- to deposit there 1 , not missing eyes and nose 
and cars and mouth of every one who dares to venture upon a 

round of the retail or wholesale districts. 

And noi only are clouds of fins! to 1 ncountered, hut build- 
ing materials of all kinds are permitted to unnecessarily obstruci 
i In- side-walks, and in many places to reach far out into the 
street, making the mute decidedly zig-zag over rickety steps and 
between piles of all sorts of debris. No one is offering objections 
to necessary obstruction of tin- streets to expedite the erection 
of buildings, hut when it comes to scattering lumber and Band 
and bricks and mortar everywhere, as if to spitefully make street 

travel a- inconvenient as possible, it is time for the improve m 

club lo explain what it exists for. 

The fact is. there is a craze in the husinoss quarter to have 

"the right men" nominated for public office, and if one maj 
judge from what seems to he the facts, there will he more candi- 
dates than voters. Politics lha! is not partisan is what the city 
nerd-, hut the best interests of the community do not ask that 
all other duties of good citizenship he put aside that this or that 

"club" may put in all the time its members can spare to "boom" 
favorites for nominations for public office. If the Down Town 
Improvement Club cannot find time to open its eyes to the abso- 
lute needs of the streets in the way of cleanliness and freedom 

from ui cessary obstructions, lei ii either quii politics or make 

no more pretensions of being whai it claims to he. 



Moral Ethics. 



Evelyn Nesbit Thaw said to a re- 
porter in New York th" other flay: 
"1 am distinctly unmoral, as the 
world to-day views morals. I have my own code of ethics and 
1 live up to them. But from present day ideals I am unmoral." 

S ids like an echo from a remark almost identical whii I 

Idly Langtry once made, when she was on close terms with the 
King of England, then the Prince of Wales. They both placed 
the inflection in "unmoral" on the "uii." as distinguished from 
"im." They do not consider themselves that; far from it. Vol- 

they have their own code of morals and live up to them, and tin" 
blame tile world for not having the same kind. There is some- 
thing t" say on both sides. The world ha- come to its code of 
morals just as it has come to its written statutes through a serir- 
of harassing experiences, which il wanted to put behind forever 

so that justice to all should prevail. What angered the dri-r 
Lily, and as it seems now has had the same effect on the pretb 



.Ii-i.y 84, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



model, is that the world will not recognize their form of im- 
morality. They call il "unmoral." Thai is a mere sophistry. 
Thej see women marrying and divorcing and going from man 
to man with the favoring anrl helping hand of the law; they 
prefer to go without this assistance. 

"During my married life with Thaw," Mrs. Thaw continued, 
"I lived at home as quietly and with as much regard Eor the 
conventions as any woman ever had." 

She did nobly, for Thaw did not deserve it. Let thai be set 
down in her credit. But one thing that has always been over- 
looked in the distorted stories that have been told about this 
unfortunate little woman is that she was never bad from the 
joy of being had: she was led into it. and was indifferent, as far 
as can be made out Unmoral is a tine word to use of her in 
thai connection. Those wdio know her say she is not the kind 
to go astray through the misfortune of too exuberant a nature. 

She is pretty and sweet and dainty. She could turn the heart 
of a jury. Her house on West Twenty-third street is a ren- 
dezvous for many clever people in New York. It is interesting 
that Lily Langtry also had a house on West Twenty-third street 
years ago. She, like Evelyn, was lacking in vulgarity. Men who 
came to her house aeted as if they were in the home of a friend. 
They tell a story of a youth who was taken to Mrs. Langtry*s 
house, and, knowing the reputation only of the mistress of the 
bouse, told a risque story to a group of men. Mrs. Langtry 
caught a few words of what he was saying, and without stopping 
the conversation in which she was engaged, rang for her butler. 
When he came, she said in a tone that caught the attention of 
every one in the room : 

".Tames, get Mr. Blank his things. He is leaving." 

The brash youth left. 

It would not be fair to leave the. subject of Evelyn Thaw- 
without quoting her a little further: 

"I may marry again. Tt is all a question in my mind as to 
(be advisability of giving up a career I have mapped out for my- 
self or of settling down to rear children in the fashion of a good 
wife or mother." 

That shows her as having more judgment, perhaps, than heart, 
which, indeed, they say she has. bul listen to Ibis, and remem- 
ber it in her favor: 

"I want it made plain that I will not trade on the notoriety 
that has attached itself to me as a result id' that terrible affair. 

If I chose I" accept the many offers thai have been made to me 
to go on the vaudeville stage I should be independently rich." 



in San Francisco, received from 2."> cents I" 30 cents net a 

sack 'for them, and at the same linn' onions were retailing al 
i cents a pound in that city. There was no demand for onions, 
because the class of persons who usually eat an abundance of 
onions could not afford to pay such a high price for them. On 
the other band. 30 cents a sack did nol pay the small producer 
in this county for pulling his onions and hauling them In (be 
shipping point. Onions average a little over 100 pounds to 
the sack. Therefore, in that ease the consumer paid more than 
twelve times the amount the producer receives, the difference on 
a sack of onions being $3.70. Of course, that was an extreme 
case, hut it was a local ease. The freight and cartage on a sack 
of onions could not reasonably be over 40 cents, and that leaves 
•$3.30 for the San Francisco commission man and the retailer 
to divide. 

"On products that are marketed so near the farm as San Fran- 
cisco is to Stockton, the producer certainly ought to get at least 
fiO per cent of the price the consumer pays, and when he gets 
less it is - an indication that there is a highwayman somewhere 
between the producer and the consumer. The current number 
of the San Francisco News Letter declares that the commission 
man is the 'Black Bart,'" 



The Fakmkk and 
the Bunco Man. 



The News Letter has tried, in two 
previous issues to sho-w thai the real 

prosperity oi the s of I lalifornia 

lav in making the conditions of li le 
iii the rural districts more bearable ami especially more profit- 
able. Right in line with this idea, it was decided to detail One 
of the young men on the slalf to the task of looking into the 
condition of life as existing between the fanner and the com- 
mission merchant, and. if the conditions "ere such as dee 

exposures, to bring ibe commission business into the calcium. 
This was done, and our readers were Healed to articles thai 
plainly showed thai Ibe producer and ibe consumer were 

mercy of an unprim i iation of buccanneers, modern 

pirates, who Sew the flag of 'be commission house and who 
were banded together by an oath as to the Modern Society of the 
Forty Thieves. 

Again il was said that you cannol waken the farmer! Hue 
commission man. after reading the article, said that it was a 
very faint picture of real conditions, and that he was not in the 
business for his health, and did any one think as he was a 
blanket} blank ass, and if be couldn't 'make the farmer j. 
fifty per cent of his earnings to him as his "trusted agent, 
well — the farmer might go to hell! The farmer has awal 
if the farmer's local press is a criterion as to the condition of 

riner's mind. A large number of State papers have taken 
up the subject, among them the Stockton Record. The SI 

i quotes the second article in the News I. r> i- in full and 
comments on its own account as follows: 

"How much should he the difference between what the pro- 
ducer get- and the consumer pays? That question has been oc- 
cupying the attention of Granges and other wganixati 
producers in this country b - 

pie: Karh n i'i, season a number of small growers, win. raised 
onions ine and shipped them to commission merchants 



The salary grabber of the olden 
The Sai.auy Grabber.. flays of the Grant regime was held 

in obloquy because lie took his salary 
for a position he held, but did not honor; he did not work, 
neither did he spin. Hi' held down a job, but be al least made 
pretense of labor, and the army of him went to the office daily 
and presented vouchers monthly at the IT. S. Depository I'm I In 1 
doubtful service to TJnclc Sam. 

In these days the salary grabber performs no work for the 
money he receives, and does not stand in line to collect for 
his perfunctory functions — the cheque is sent to him. He labors 
for others, and Uncle Sam fools Ibe bill. This is the case with 
the Heney man. It. has been shown in Congress by the chair- 
man of two committees thai of appropriations and the other 
deficiencies that Heney has received something like $29,000 for 
labor he did not perform, the record- -bowing that al the time 
be received this money he was not in the employ of the Govern- 
ment other than being carried on a special budget, for which 
be did not render any accounl in labor- done. In other words, 
he was carried on the books simply as a. salary grabber and col- 
lected regularly his pay for working out or attempting to work 
out the vengeances of the Rough Rider President and the Sprock- 
et conspirator- in San Franci-co. Il remain- to be -ecu what 

Congress will do in this case. It is a question that is quite seri- 
ous in it- various angles, and which would indicate I 
private panic, are strong with the executive head of a nation 
they may have delegated to them pari of his czar-like pow-r. It 
means that public office may be disgraced by private feud and 

the treasury of the nation wasted in senseless ami panic produc- 

Ogeances. What will Cong,'-- d" in ibis mailer? 



The idea of transforming Lake 

Street Transformation, street into a boulevard connecting 
ibe city with the Fourteenth avenue 
boulevard, the Presidio driveways with Ocean boulevard, at the 
Cliff House, tin- tew Park and through the 

old city cemetery, is a line one. and it should be carried out as 
works of the city. It should he made pos- 
sible to begin work at once. 

The park in itself will be another beauty -pot added to the 
city, and the boulevard system, while partaking in a large 
the artistic, will' lie utilitarian in character. Thi 
park will contain "200 acres, [t wi'l he possible to drive through 
this park from Lake street to the Cliff House, connecting there- 
with the ocean boulevard. It will be one of the finest view- 
points all along the line. From the park, the ocean and the 
Golden Gate will he in sight all the time. From the new park. 
the drive will extend down the hill to the beach, thence to Golden 
i. ate Park and the Fourteenth street boulevard, and. on this. 
back to Lai, ad theme to the winding driveway through 

the Presidio. 



Dealers in war scares have oi narket, but 

Wall street is in Deed of a few first alarm - 

now that the rural lambs are beginning to realize on their pro- 
duce and other evidences of cash on hand. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 24, 1909 



It cannot be said that business in 
The Business Outlook. San Francisco is active, but it may- 
be said that it is satisfactory under 
existing conditions. This, however, is true. Business of all 
kinds is moving forward upon stronger lines than since early in 
1907, in. the autumn of 1906, rather, and it is equally true that 
there are few if any elements of a threatening nature in sight. 
Everywhere the feeling is one of confidence. This is due largely 
to the absence of the spirit of speculation and the hesitation that 
capital evinces in going into hazardous ventures, even when the 
promise is for most liberal returns. There is plenty of loanable 
funds in the open market, and the banks were never more able 
to carry commerce and trade; only that bank and open market 
lenders scrutinize securities and credits more critically than in 
former times, but there is money and to spare, and no legitimate 
and conservatively managed enterprise need want for loans and 
discounts. 

In all respects, therefore, the outlook is decidedly encouraging, 
but expansion in volume beyond an even pace with legitimate de- 
mands need not be expected, which is a condition of trade and 
traffic that is to be desired. From this time on there is every 
reason to expect a steady and wholesome movement in accumu- 
lation and distribution of merchantable commodities, with a 
steadily increasing demand for industrial products. The signs 
of the times and the spread of confidence surely point to a most 
prospei-ous and satisfying term of years in every field of mer- 
chandise, mechanics and labor. 

The conspiracy in Congress to largely increase the tariff 
schedules has been a sore and severe handicap on every industry, 
but President Taft has taken the sting out of it, and even 
should the Payne-Aldnch bill become a law, the President would 
promptly veto it, so in any event no higher duties will become 
lawful this year, which simply means the LMngley law will con- 
tinue in operation at least until some time next winter. In view 
of all these golden promises, there should be no room for pes- 
simism or anything akin to it. He is blind indeed who cannot 
see that San Francisco is entering one of the most promising 
periods of business expansion in her history, and it is wicked to 
refuse to read the signs of the times in their own light. 



Good Roads. 



One of the greatest statesmen that 
the United States has ever produced, 
James G. Blaine, once said that if 
the country desired "to maintain its supremacy as a nation, one 
of the leading nations of the world, it must maintain its high- 
ways," and "there is work for engineers to do and the time is 
short." Surely, if the time was short when the great and gifted 
son of Maine delivered himself of this good roads sermon, it is 
still shorter now. " Is the Frenchman right who dubs us "the 
spendthrift nation," and who says we throw all of our gifts 
away, simply and onlv because we have them right at hand? 

We have tried through sentiment to reach the public, but it is 
not through sentiment alone that the construction and the main- 
enance, especially the maintenance, of our public highways, 
should be promoted ! 

It is almost an aphorism here in California, and in fact all 
over the West, that you cannot awaken the fanner to the neces- 
sity of the hour, and that he, the farmer, is the specially or- 
dained but for the gold brick man and bunco artist, and the least 
of these is the legislator, is well known. It is also aphoristic that 
the farmer knows familiarly all of the evils he is made to carry 
for the rest of the community, but that he is used to it, and that 
his back is broad and that he likes to bear fardels for others is 
also accepted as true. No matter what is accepted as truth, the 
fact remains that the San Francisco News Letter aims to awn ken 
the agriculturist to the necessity of establishing good roads clubs 
in every small town in California, and the News Letter believes 
that it is something that can be accomplished because, in the face 
of the same denial of possibility, the News Letter, unaided and 
single-handed, enlisted the farmer in the fight against the race 
track, and through the farmer and by his efficient help, the race 
track, and its criminal side partners, was destroyed in the State 
of California forever. That is what the farmer, once awakened, 
did for the city. It is now high time that the farmer did some- 
thing for himself. 



Poor roads impose an unnecessary 
Poor Roads. burden on those who most constantly 

use them. This is a financial burden. 
This form of taxation i° in reality self-levied by the farmer upon 



themselves and upon those who consume the products grown in 
the rural sections and brought to the city by farmers. California 
is only a little worse than many of our States and a little better 
than a few of them. Poor roads are an economic waste placed on 
the shoulders of eighty-five millions of people by the almost 
criminally shameful condition of two million miles of roads. 
Every pound of farm products brought into thickly populated 
sections from the rural districts has a fictitious value placed upon 
it because it costs the farmer more to transport it than it would 
cost him were the roads in passably good condition. The cost of 
the breakfast roll would be but trifling did it not cost the farmer 
who grew the wheat 1.8 cents a bushel more to haul the wheat 
nine miles to the railroad station than it does to carry a bushel 
of wheat from New York to Liverpool, 3,100 miles ! 

The cost of a soft-boiled egg is not based on the cost of pro- 
ducing the egg, but on the cost of transportation from the hen 
to the hotel. The worth of the egg has nothing, or very little, to 
do with it. Lastly, let us appeal to the California farmer in this 
crusade for good roads with just a little plain blunt illustrations. 
Any one who uses his think tank at all must concede that if a 
fanner with two horses can draw but 600 pounds to market or to 
the railroad siding at Petaluma. San Jose, Fresno or Los Gatos 
in five hours, he would save money if with one horse he could 
draw 1200 pounds the same distance in two hours. If California 
roads were in eighty per cent as good condition as the roads of 
France he could do that and more. The remedy for the poor 
road lies right at hand. The remedy is good roads, and the way 
to get about it is to organize Good Roads Clubs at every cross- 
roads town and hamlet, and with these clubs bring about agita- 
lion and constant hammering at the legislative candidates. 
Everybody should be in favor of good roads. Everybody evi- 
dently is, but that doesn't build the roads. The railroad is in 
favor of good roads, because it means prosperity to the farmer, 
because it means more shipments, because it means that the coun- 
try merchant will benefit. The increase in wealth is easily dem- 
onstrated to any one who will lend us his ears, and yet we are 
told that we cannot waken the farmer. We are told that the 
class journals, the farm journals of wide circulation, have never 
taken up this subjei t because they could not waken the farmer. 
The idea is that he sleepeth ever. It is not true. 



The San Francisco woman is a woman of taste, and she 

knows the real thing in style when she sees it. Paris is in her 
eye, for Paris is the model of fashions feminine. "The Bonnet 
Shop," importers of Parisian millinery, at 121 Geary street, em- 
bodies in all its displays all that is "chic" in the very latest 
Paris modes in headgear for women. The hats are strictly tail- 
ored and are snappy and smart in design and color. 

WEDDING PRESENTS. 
The choicest variety to select from at Marsh's, corner Cali- 
fornia and Polk streets ; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



X 




C H AS. KEJ LUS & CO 
£XC£SC/SI\TE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No Branch Stores. No Agents. 

THE SATISFACTION OF KNOWING THAT YOU'RE GETTING 
CLOTHES THAT ARE ABSOLUTELY CORRECT IS A SMART 
DRESSER'S SECRET. HE NEVER QUESTIONS PRICE; HE LOOKS 
ONLY FOR LATE STYLES. HIS CLOTHES ARE ALWAYS RIGHT. 
CLOTHES THAT ARE CORRECT DON'T NEED THE PRUNING 
KNIFE. WE HAVE CORRECT CLOTHES. 



THIS LABEL 
ASSISTS YOU 
TO DRESS 




eTErukr 
£ilus S> (Ha 
anciscn. 



COMMERCIALLY 
AND SOCIALLY 
CORRECT 



Our advance suggestions for the approaching season are now 
here, and ready for you to make selections. The fall garments 
contain the best American talent In designing, fashioning and 
in making. A cleverly attired gentleman demands recogni- 
tion, and has confidence in himself for any occasion. He can 
always command an audience, because his clothes proclaim 
for him "class." He doesn't look like "a bargain sale man." 
He gets clothes when they're in style and not passe. 



Jewelers Building, Po& Street, near Kearny, San Francisco 



Jul-s 24, 1909 



and California Advertiser 




The State of Washington has a new law which will have 

the effect of making would-be suicides follow Davy Crockett's 
advice and be very sure that they are right before they go ahead. 
The law makes it a crime to attempt to commit suicide. If the 
suicide perfects his work, he is passed on to a jurisdiction higher 
even than the Supreme Court of the State of Washington. But 
if he fails in his attempt he is dragged into the police court to 
explain why the burdens of life were so enormous that he sought 
to pass on to a ghostly sphere, to the Mecca of more travelers, 
even, than Seattle. I presume the theory of the law is, that if 
the jury finds that the man's troubles are sufficient to justify 
him in ending them, capital punishment will be inflicted, and 
every one concerned will be satisfied. 

Never was there shown a brighter example of the high 

brow, James Huneker knack of criticising one art in the terms 
of another than by the latest words of "Tiv" Kreling, heir to 
the ashes and musical traditions of the Tivoli Opera House. Mr. 
Kreling is now a supreme judge of the court of fisticuffs. He 
presides with dignity and aplomb in the judicial district of 
C'off roth's Mission street arena, and there is no appellate juris- 
diction over him. Therefore, his word must be listened to with 
reverence, particularly when he says, discussing learnedly the 
fight over which he officiated as referee last Saturday: "Mr. 
Young Corbett fought in flats: Mr. Frayne in sharps." The 
sharps, by the way, won. 

Washington newspapermen are becoming piqued by the 

obliviousness of the aeroplane Wrights to the virtue of being 
urbane to interviewers. Therefore, in their accustomed habit 
of thought, the newspapermen minimize the importance of tiro 
Wrights' achievements. The Washington reporters are working 
on a dangerous precept. It does not EoUot thai ;i man who 
evades reporters is a faker any more than it dors that tin- man 
who makes himself a good fellow among newspapermen is realli 
right. For instance, Abe Ruef was probably, ami may be yet, 
the suavest citizen who ever outplayed an interviewer. 

A suggestion, probably advanced bj the theatrical man- 
agers' association, is thai people called oul on lair errands, and 
in peril of footpads, should have theatre tickets in their pockets. 
Then, the argument continues, when you are held up the robber 
will take the tickets, along with the real of your wealth, will 
fall into tin' trap ami go to the show, to be arrested Btraightway 
by a policeman supplied with the number of the pilfered tickets. 
That suggestion is ideal, except- suppose the ro 

Lor tastes, and would not enjoy nor care I" see the BOrt 
VMii would seleci as the trap ! 

it is reported from Berlin that tin' C 

mation of tin European Aristocrae] bj Princess Mane 

\la\miilliannvna. of Baden, is not being welcomed by the down 
and oul bai in ■ its which the organization seeks to re- 

claim. The purpose of the movement is to Btarl a Bort oi 

home for -I' nited nobles, Whei taught, some hon- 

est trade like blacksmithing or pugilism. I'm: the a-- 
object. Thej claim that they have a particularly lucraic 

ii now— the marrying of American and other 
in ir money. 

The Hoard of Supervisors, with a tine reform hand, abol- 

ihe slot machines and now is engaged in the worthy busi- 
ness of legalising dice throwing. If we have patience we may 
expect some wonderful developments along that line of 
lion. Smuggling may he condemned as a capital .rime, ment- 

indign punishment, and piracy on the 1 
a glowing virtue. Hcvh der Supervisor Hocks. 

Reports from the front CO] it < 

time from neuralgia. This is too 
. but his pain is nothing 
n his lions and elephants, so horn • 
for the white man. 



The commendable work- of Pastor Russell, the Brook- 
lyn, N. V. Presbyterian clergyman in Oakland last Sunday, 
when he abolished itell. will lie rewarded with the applause of 
I he sinful multitude, which never did like the place very much 
anyway, and only were going there because il laj ai ilc end of 
the "Easiest Way." But truck drivers, chiefs of lire depart- 
ments and newspaper editors., whoso work requires a virile 
vocabulary, will regret exceedingly the action of the worthy 
clergyman, lie has nullified the force of their best phrase. 
Now only can we say: "Do to — where?" 

At last the Bar Association is about to take steps to dis- 
bar George I). Collins. While that eminent advocate was prac- 
ticing with offices in the County Jail, and with inferior subjects 
for his clients, it was not considered dangerous for him to be 
a member in (legally speaking) perfectly good standing before 
the courts. Now that George's lot is cast with a more daring set 
of malefactors, it is not considered conducive to good judicial 
discipline to permit him still to flaunt the mystic sign "Attornev- 
at-Law." 

The people safely may allow President Taft to entertain 

at dinner Senator Aldrieh, Speaker Cannon and other brilliant 
definers of the tariff as a balloon which ever must go up. There 
isn't any very great danger that Taft, with bis recent declara- 
tions still reverberating through the press, will he materially 
influenced by the conferees. But it would not lie safe to allow 
Taft to eat with Aldrieh. Something surely would be put in his 
tea. 

The finding of the Secretary of the Navy in the ease of 

Lieutenant Franklin Wayne Osburn, f". S. \ T .. charged with 
having committed an offense by kissing the wife of Naval Con- 
structor Hoklen A. Evans, of Mare Island, establishes a new 
code in the service. By the irrefutable logic of the Washington 
decision, it is as heinous an offense to kiss a brother officer's 
wife as it is to make a roar when your own helpmate has been 
kissed by the aforesaid brother officer. 

The Humane Society has started a . rusade, commendable 

In some respects, lo keep small children off the stage. Now it 
the society could go a step further and have enacted a law to 
keep children out of the audience of most of those cheap amuse- 
ment places, there really would he something accomplished. 
There is some excuse for a child heme ,. || M . stage— it usually 
lias a. pair of parents to support. 

The Reno divorce colony, of which Mis. Daniel Froh- 

man (Margaret Ellington) and other prominent ladies of un- 
happy marital experiences are members, witnessed an amateur 
production of "Under Two Flags" last Monday night. Soon 
those same ladies ;i re separately to figure in formal produ 
oi' "Changing the < iolors." 




o 



7/, 



ia7U/n/. 




Large reductions on Summer 
Apparel in every Department. 
Garments which are specially 
adapted for vacation and out- 
ing wear. 

GRANT AVENUE AND GEARY ST. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 24, 1909 




Humorous aspects of infidelity continue to form the principal 
theme for enti rtainmcnf - devised by the vaudeville people. The 
talented young men and women who write for or act upon the 
vaudeville stage, and the accomplished business men who handle 
the circuit realize the attraction that such subjects have I'm' the 
people who buy seats at their houses. 

So the complaint isn't against the theatre managements nor 
against the actors and singers. Only, it is a curious t'ael that an 
instance of infidelity, pattered forth to crocked music, can al- 
wavs arouse a laugh. The latest song to the popular idea is that 
little homily on marital faithlessness — "I love my wife. Inn (). 
you kid." Probably there is not a nice young lady or school 
girl in the city who does not murmur that ballad as she dusts 
the sacred images in her sleeping room, or lays the table tor her 
lather's breakfast. There surely isn't a joyful lady with mid- 
night automobile propensities who doesn't warble the song as 
the rent car skids unto the Great Highway at the ocean beach. 
It seems to be a song id' universal appeal — in fact, with an appeal 
so universal that it is reiterated in formal, legal prose in the 
divorce courts about ten times every week. To analyze the selec- 
tion, it seems to meet tin' every demand of a popular poem. It 
conveys such a funny picture, too. That of an unamiable wife 
finding her husband in a "cafe" — say the "Breaker," down stairs 
near the Hall of Justice, and yanking him away from his cups 
while he chants poor music to a casual lady. 

It is quite an amusing song, and when the National Associa- 
tion of Affinities meets in Chicago next June, it will doubtless 
he adopted as Hie national air. 

* * * 

Those two praiseworthy public officials of San Mateo County 
— District Attorney J. J. Bullock and Sheriff Bob Chatham — 
have every confidence, each in the other's ability to stamp out 
gambling in their joint county. The sheriff declares his belief 
that it ever he has time thoroughly to investigate the resorts 
near the county line, and can secure evidence against any law* 
breakers, the District Attorney will prosecute them to the fullest 
exleul of the law. The District Attorney insists that it there is 
any gambling practiced in the resorts, lie is positive that that 
vigilant officer. Sheriff Chatham, will discover that fact. Since 
the sheriff has been unable to secure any evidence against the 
gamblers, it i- as good as proven that there are no gamblers in 
the county. 

In the meantime. A Jinn Chateau across the county line runs 
full blast every evening, affording local bankers glorious chances 
for circulating their deposits. 

Sheriff Chatham lends his garden in his beautiful $15,000 
bungalow in Redwood City, and Bullock goes about trying to 
forget what the grand jury tried to do to him, and in A Mon 
Chateau and the Northern the roulette wheel clicks its course. 
It is whispered that society women of the San Jose district drop 
into the resorts occasionally and buck the tiger- — but that cannot 
be true, for Sheriff Chatham, in hi? handsome bungalow, says he 
can find no gambling. 

* * * 

Not one in the legion of his friends believes for a moment 
that attorney J. W. Scott was guilty of the charge brought 
against him by Louise White, the substitute stenographer tem- 
porarily in his office. Scott's character is above reproach, and 
the lie is given to the charge by such circumstances as the 
woman's delay in bringing the charge, her continuing at work 
after the alleged assault, her pleasant chat with the elevator 
boy a few minutes after its stated time of occurrence, and her 
failure to appear in court as the complaining witness on the day 
set for preliminary hearing, necessitating a bench warrant to 
secure her presence. By a notable coincidence, several of Scott's 
acquaintances, without consultation, asked of themselves and of 



others the question: "Is it a Burns frame-up?'-' The question 
was not unnatural. The whole affair has the ear-marks of the 
handiwork id' the King of the Gum-shoe Men. Scott was counsel 
for Peter Claudianes, of "Gallagher dynamite outrage" fame. 
What more natural to think that Scott, under stress of ao U a- 
lioii by a woman, might not be forced into an unenviable posi- 
tion in connection with the Gallagher affair? But Scott is of 
a different sort, lie is a sturdy, conscientious, upright young 

man. who studied law at night while working as a reporter OD an 
evening paper by day. He has risen by sheer merit, industry ami 
honorable dealing. To him such a charge as the White woman 
has brought is singularly galling. 

* * * 

Charles Baron, the young artist, who, to tide over a distress- 
ful financial period, has become a motorman on the I'nitcd Kail- 
roads line, seems to In' the best sort of aristocratic foreigner 
who has appeared here in a public role for some time. He is a 
decided improvement on Count d'Abbans, who has been removed 

from the local French consulate for the g I of the peace of 

I lie French colony and elsewhere, and Vreetman, the Swedish 
"Prince" of Oakland police circles. 

Baron, when he was down on his luck, took a job that must 
have heeii hard work lor him. although he is an athletic fellow. 
He is a popular member of the French club Cercle de I'TJnion, 
and his fellow club mates find a great deal of amusement in the 
fact that one of their associate- handles a controller har. When 
a newspaper office inquired of the club recently to find if Baron 
was there, the club fellows showed great interest in tin' inquiry. 

"Why do you want to See him?" was asked, "lias he run OVI ' 

anybody ?" 

* * * 

San Franciscans have had | \position of the methods of the 

color photographer given them lately by the most expert of all 
the amateurs wdio are doing so much to develop photography 
along these lines. These gentlemen are Mr. Stanley Maginuis 
ami Mr. George F. Clifton. 

Under the auspices of the California Club, at Christian 
Science Hall, on June 23d, and later on the L6th of Jul} a 
the Saint Francis Hotel, the two artists displayed lantern slides 
mark' in color photography that rival nature in beautiful shad- 
ings, depths and tone. The wizards of the aulocbrome add to 
i la color sense an extraordinary divination as to what consti- 
tutes the artistic and the pleasing, and it is safe to say that their 
audiences were quite as well pleased with their selection- ol 
pictures as with their splendid color sense. 'I'he results obtained 
in the one hundred and twenty-five picture- shown is the sum 
of infinite pains and care taken in selection of subjects and in 
choice of lighting: often there are days consumed in securing 

a peculiar light effect or a certain exposure. The two gentle- 
men are amateurs, hut it is the amateurs that have so far de- 
veloped color photography. In their efforts will finally he found 
i he ilue that will make it possible to use color pjiotograpln 
cheaply ami commercially. 

* * * 

An enterprising vegetable dealer on Union street, either hav- 
ing traveled a hit or heen informed by some one that the rest of 
111 United Stales regards artichokes as worth about fifty cents 




New York \^£f J <i//f/j(J///j0~ Paris 

//vc » upon* rea 
New Location 139-143 Geary Street, between Grant Ave. and Stockton 



Phenomenal Sale of Waists 
at $4.95— $6.95 

Embroidered Chiffon, Lace Net, Applique 
Lingerie, Messaline. in black and all 
colors, at one-half and less than one-half 
their regular value. 



.rn.v 34, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



apiece, and not to be bought except for a banquet, took the tip 3 
and inserted an advertisement in some of the Eastern papers 
which arc read by housekeepers thai he will furnish five arti- 
chokes Eor a dollar. Permitting all the profit which is fair to a 

retail merchant, ami counting in postag ■ express charges, if 

he offered four times as many for the price there would be some 
reason to his charge. But, even ai that, he is offering artichokes 
at a much lower price than the Bast ever saw them ai before. 

Trade is supposed to be tm much alive, and we arc always 
hearing about the wide-awake men who take advantage of every 
opportunity to catch the fleeting dollar wherever it may be, 
whether in the heart uf cities or in the wilderness, and there is 
much truth in it. But now and then the whole business world 
will slip up on some easy little business proposition, and no one 
takes up under the belief that there must be something wrong 
with it or some one else would have tried long ago. Artichokes 
are in this class. Of all the delicious fruits and vegetables 
California produces, there is probably not one which is eaten so 
regularly here in the State, particularly in San Francisco, as 
this easily-grown vegetable. It can be bought at as cheap a 
price as five cents a dozen over in the Italian Quarter, and it is 
a mighty big artichoke which sells for sixty cents a dozen. The 
five cent variety may be small and the leaves may be of little 
consequence, but the heart is there, ami that is the most succu- 
lent part of the whole vegetable. 

It is to be hoped that the Union street dealer receives plenty of 
orders, anil a little competition is started. There is no reason 
why good California artichokes should not he sold in New York 
City at 30 cents a dozen. There would be another nourishing 
industry for the State. 

* * * 

Lieutenant Paul Ward Beck, head of the Signal Corps on the 
Pacific Coast, who has been through two campaigns and should 
know, is responsible for the following statement: "Courage," 
said Beck, "why. anv healthy man is courageous once he gets 
into a fight. The first bullet whistling about his cars maj give 
him a hankering to duck perhaps, but after that he's like an old 
campaigner. There's only one thing licit makes a coward of a 
man on a battlefield — his stomach. If his digestion is bad he 
is ready to turn tail every time. An army of good stomachs can 
lick the world, and they don'l need anv "fighi temperament" 
either. In view of the fact that there has been so much talk of 
pulling hair with Japan, and thai the Examiner is kindly hav- 
ing gun- added — bunches of them — to our armament along the 
coast, this knowledge iimv prove useful. 

* * * 

llailn't Willie, on his way West, with blood in his eye aid 

the plan of a new one hundred storj building in his pistol poi I 
with which he is going to challenge the Call's ability for i 
off scoops on Market streel — hadn'i Willie, we suggest, better 
lake a hunch to himself? . Three oi four days ago the Exami- 
ner had us lighting with Japan. Should this deadly war take 
place, whai ma\ noi happen to Hearst's uen building? Bi er 
wait, William, till \ou ami your paper us, in us from thi 
of the brown; or sell the ploi for a diving tank and drown your 
staff in it thai failed to land a - 

* * * 

Sir Basil Brooke, the young [riah lord, strayed from 
Francis, and owner of twenty-eighl thousand acres of land, be- 
sides a title, is to be commended. We do noi saj this beca 
lost himself, or bi 's Irish, but because he dropped his 

title and preferred to tra\ 'I under an ordinary cognomen. Am 
man who can pass over the daughter- of the money kings in thi* 

manner is siiicU worth hunting for. But heaven help him in 
tins land of the free if he is ever found. 

* * » 

Presidenl Tuff believes, evidently, in the virtues of a 

dinner, lie has undertaken to dine his- lean "( re« of 

tariff stand-pi. tiers into something like a e frame ol 

nun,! ,m the court n • Instead of '.he "big stick" the 

- to pass the possum. Why ivt let him feed the 
clique on raw materials — then they n 
on the If,, 



Pears' 

"A cake of pre- 
vention is worth a 
box of cure." 

Don't wait until 
the mischief's done 
before using Pears 
Soap. 

There's no pre- 
ventive so good as 
Pears' Soap. 

Established in 1789. 



Announcement 



The Tozer Co. 



beg to announce that they 
are now permanently loca- 
ted at 228 Grant Ave. Next to 
White House. Second floor. 



Fine Wall Papers, Draperies, and Interior 
Decorating 

Telephone Douglas 1869 



Promptness is a characteristic of the Spaulding ' 

Cleaning Company. Thoroughness .or, and the housewife 

trusts her - to this firm is a walking adver- 

nt of its efl Every quality that goes to ensure an 

jing patronage is the practice of this reliable house. 



Surprise Suction Sweeper ^gj^ 

Patented Feb 4. IW8 

Price $12.50. Operated by hand. Large sale East. No exertion. No 
fatigue. Can be operated by a child. Is portable. Weighs only 5 lbs. 
Does the work of Electric Sweeper at no cos) for operation. By express 
prepaid. Just introduced West. Agents warned in Washington. Oregon. 
California. Montana. Idaho. I rah, Nevada. Arizona. New Mexico. Colo- 
rado. Wyoming. Send for Advertising Matter. 

Pacific Utilities Company 

Monadnock Building. San Francisco 

Controlling Exclusive Rights for Above Mentioned 
Stales and Terntont-. 



Branch Office. 542 So. Spring 
Street. Los Angeles, Cal. 



Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty little booklet of exquisitely perfumed powdered leaves to 
carry in the purse. A handy article for all occasions to quickly Im- 
prove the complexion. Sent for 5 Cents In stamps or coin. F. T. 
Hopkins. S7 Great Jonea St. N. T. 




San Francisco News Letter 



July 24, 1909 



ttty? iitntafrr nf 3famgn Affairs 



What it Means 
to Germany. 



The retirement of Prince von Buc- 
low, Chancellor of the German Em- 
pire, from office, is the most im- 
portant political event in Europe in 
a third of a century. The founding of the empire was the work 
of Prince Bismarck, and made possible by the downfall of 
Napoleon III. which came as a consequence of the defeal of 
France in the Franco-German war. It was at this moment that 
the man of "Iron and Blood," Bismarck, conceived the idea of 
establishing an empire federating the twenty-six German States 
with Prussia, with the Hohenzollern family as the hereditary 
rulers. Things went well with the new empire until the present 
Emperor, William II, came to the throne, and who, in his con- 
ceit and arrogance, got rid of the great Bismarck. .Since then 
the States in the federation have gradually grown suspicious 
of the Emperor, because of his assumption of authority that it 
was never contemplated the Emperor of the .federation should 
possess. While believing firmly in the divine right of kings, 
the kings and princes and the other rulers of the States began 
to fear that William It had in mind to eventually absorb then 
divine right, and assume to be God's only chosen ruler of the 
German peoples. As is well known, the rulers of the States 
Aavemany times protested against his assumption of authority 
and especially for pursuing policies that threatened to involve 
I he empire in foolish wars, especially with France and Greai 
Britain, for the last few years, the States have been scheming 
together to restrain the Emperor through the Reichstag, but 
until now with little success. 

Their time came some days ago, however, when by adroit 
tactics a clear majority was grouped against a Government meas- 
ure, and Prince von BueJow was forced to suffer a positive de- 
feat for the Government, it being the first time in the history 
of the empire that a chancellor and official representative of the 
Emperor was charged with attempting to force the Reichstag to 
accept royal wishes in any event. But when a positive defeat 
was forced upon him, not only he, but the Emperor, realized 
that a new order of things was to be introduced into the Gov- 
ernment which would operate to clip the wings of the Em- 
[i ror's boundless ambition to be the supreme head of the 
nation in all public affairs — that, in fact, the method of con- 
ducting every department was to be radically changed. Hence 
the real meaning of Chancellor BueloVs defeat, which is also 
a stinging rebuke to Emperor William, in that hereafter the 
cabinet or ministers will have to look to the Reichstag for ap- 
proval of their foreign as well as domestic policies of Govern- 
ment conduct, thus relieving the Emperor of that mighty work, 
which he has hitherto held to be his by divine right. Hereafter 
it will be very much in Germany as it is in England, where thi 
House of Commons controls policies and legislation, and as in 
France, where the lions.' of Deputies approves or rejects Govs 
eminent policies. 



It is conceded thai unless tin- MorOG- 
AxAiirirY ix Morocco. cans themselves speedily restore or- 
der in their country the Algeciras 
Convention will have to be re-convened and the nation's party 
to it adopt drastic measures. The reigning Sultan has lost con- 
trol of the situation, and there are two pretenders in the field 
raising troops to take the throne by force, but as each pretender 
realizes that he has to destroy his rival as well as to overthrow 
the existing Government, it is possible that the complexity of 
the situation may so weaken the pretenders that the Govern- 
ment, with the moral support of France, England and 'Spain, 
will enable the Sultan to put down both rebellions. On the 
other hand, Germany is likely to renew her fight for certain 
claimed territorial rights and trade privileges which would be 
resisted by France even at the expense of a war. And another 
danger lies in the fact that when the question was being arbi- 
trated at Algeciras, Russia voted against Germany's claims, 
but now the Czar and the Kaiser are under an agreement to 
stand together in all international affairs. It certainly is true 
that anarchy prevails all over Morocco, and that the two pre- 
tenders are trying to incite a religious war. and are being en- 
couraged in it by agents of the deposed Sultan of Turkey. Spain 



has already thrown a small column of troops into Morocco, but 
it is not expected that a hostile demonstration will be made at 
present. Great Britain has made no move other than to assure 
France that her occupation of Morocco must be maintained and 
the Algeciras agreement upheld. Germany has given no sign 
of her intentions, which rather intensifies the situation. That 
a crisis is at hand, there is no doubt. 



As to Persia. 



Rather less than was expected has 
transpired in Persia. Shah Moham- 
med Ali is dethroned, and Ahmed 
Miraza, former Crown Prince, is now Sultan, with Azad ul Mulk 
as regent, Miraza still being in his teens. It is a clear victory 
for the Nationalists or Constitutional party, which insures a 
Parliament and a Constitutional Government. That the former 
Shah would be deposed before the month was out, no one 
doubted, but it was pretty generally supposed that England and 
Russia would undertake to rule the country jointly, Great Brit- 
ain appointing a commissioner lor the southern half and Russia 
one for the northern half, but no doubt there is a secret under- 
standing between London and St. Petersburg that amounts to 
the same .thing. But what is puzzling the capitals of Europe 
most is, if this new understanding between the Czar and King 
Edward will not weaken the new Russian-German-Austrian 
offensive alliance, for the mutual interests of Great Britain and 
Russia are now closer than ever; besides, it is known that France 
is very hostile to Russia's new position in the Near East German 
program. 



Notwithstanding rumors of Tur- 
Of General Interest. key's purpose to pick a quarrel with 
Greece, there is no foundation for 
them, however much the Young Turks would like such diversion 
from internal troubles. It is well-known in Constantinople that 
Bulgaria is fully prepared under German influence to move 
down upon Turkey and invade Macedonia the moment Greece is 
attacked; moreover, the Cretan trouble is settled for the present, 
and Turkey has no excuse to pick a quarrel with King George. 

That display of 148 warships in home waters, with a cordial 
invitation of the peoplt to visit the ships, has created a wonder- 
ful reaction in English public sentiment concerning England's 
preparedness for war with Germany, or any other nation. In 
tact, public sentiment has so veered around thai a war would 
almost be welcomed to show the nations thai Great Britain is 
still the balance of the political power of I lie world, and is fully 
prepared to maintain her supremacy. 

China and Russia have called a halt in their negotiations for 
a commercial treaty thai was to give Russia great advantage in 
Chinese trade circles. The protests of the United States W ire 
too » igorous to he ignored. 

Japan continues almost to starve her people thai their wages 
may go for war preparations. 



RED & WHITE 



BURGUNDIES 



FROM 



C. Marey & Liger-Belair 

Nuits, France 

Charles Meineeke & Co. 



Agents Pacific Coast 



San Francisco 






July 24, 1909 



and California Advertiser 




BASWRMND 




1U, Jcy*. *~J &r&au*j--X./l~i 



By Baenett Franklin. 

The Summer Stock Season Opens at the American. 

Pending the official opening of the Schubert season, the latter 
part of August, the American Theatre is prepared to do things 
in the stock production line. Accordingly, a band of thespians 
and thespianesses, many of whom are known to us for perform- 
ances in the past, has been engaged, a number of pronounced-to- 
be-acceptable plays have been secured, and the game is on. Just 
how successful an undertaking the American stock season is 
likely to prove is hard to tell at this stage of the proposition, 
but it may be said that in many ways they have started off quite 
auspiciously — if not in others. 

"The Duel" is the play that was selected for the initial offer- 
ing. It will be remembered as a vehicle of that capable mum- 
mer, Otis Skinner, when he was here season before last. Big 
in theme, interesting in the development of plot, and compelling 
often in the tensity of its situations, "The Duel" is to be reck- 
oned with in the lists of the somewhat-different dramas. That 
the play, however, is a particularly happy selection for the open- 
ing of a popular stock season, is open to considerable question. 
On second thought, there is no question about it — "The Duel," 
in spite of its many excellencies, does not make for a popular 
appeal. 

The plot of this play of Henri Lavedan has to do with a bat- 
tle between two brothers for a woman. The one is a priest of 
the church who is striving for her soul ; the other is an atheist 
who seeks her love. It is a strong scheme for a drama, and 
though the action isoften slow and much of the dialogue "talky," 
though the development of the plot, is elemental, and there is 
nothing of surprise in the eventual disclosure, the play is unique 





Oriff, London's favorite Juggling letting Johnnie, and his son 
begin an engagement this Sunday matinee at 
the Orpheum. 



lila St. Leon, as Polly, in "Polly of the Circus," at the \ an 
Ness Theatre. 

in many ways, and, for the least, absorbing to the thinking 
theatre-goer. 

Heading the American Stock Company is Hersche] May all, 
the one-time idol of the admirers of the Theodore Ri- 
ot dramatic guff. Mayall is still popular hereabout-, j 
by the reception he is getting from old friends in the audiences 
this week, and his voice ia just as tempestuous as eveT it was — 
if not a little bit more. He is a very actory actorr-r-r, is Mr. 
Mayall. He fairly oozes actoriam. He sighs deeply and 
bis eves, in addition to his voice, on the drop of the hat. lb- 
loves to throw out his chest. He is the n 
will find hereabouts, in fact. \m\ he Ion culate after 

the manner of the elocution and Delaarte Bcho 

And yet Mr. Mayall is a man of considerable talent. The pity 
is. that he has seen fit to do ;he unintellectual thing, to play 
every role according to rote — to stand-still. The spread-eagle- 
ism of his speeches may inspire shrill whistles of approval from 
the gallery gods, and create awe with the timid, but for my bum- 
ble Belf they are like unto the political orations of the 
They are barren of real histrionic art. and. especially in a play 
of the order of "The Duel." they jar much. 

Mise Harriet Worthiogton is the leading woman, and • 
quite pleasing withal, her naturalness being an ex 
trast to the unnaruralness of Mr. Mayall. Gerald Hanourt is 
another member of the company who has an important role in 
this production, and as the atheist brother good work. 

The production generally is of a good standard ; scener- 
turnery, and the other ingredients, being up to a good mark. 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 24, 1909 



"The Silver Girl" ai the Alcazar. 

Edward Peple, of "Prince Chap" fame, has done a very grace- 
ful thing in "The Silver Girl," which the Alcazar has been most 
capably producing. The plot of this little play is almost trite. 
but it has an abundance of charm, and, too, it is amply sur- 
charged with that quality which, for want of a better term, we 
call "heart interest." Obvious though many of the situations 
are, and hackneyed as may be the story, '-The Silver Girl" there- 
fore makes a strong appeal to audiences. The third-act climax 
is a particularly moving and striking thing. 

"The Silver Girl," be it known, has nothing to do with a 
maiden; it is merely the name of a mine about which tin |ilui 
of the play revolves. The miner is Jefferson Hunter — in this 
case E. L. Bennison. The burden of the play falls on Mr. Ben- 
nison's shoulders, and it is quite a striking; and bluff characters 
zation in its entirety he gives. Howard Hickman is excellent 
as Hargrave, the vilvun. Thurlow Bergen does good work in a 
subdued role, and Burt Wesner furnishes the laughs of the per- 
formance. 

The erring wife of the miner is most capably handled by 
Louise Brownell, and the others are all in the picture. The 
production is almost pretentious, and generally admirable. 

* * * 

"Too Much Johnson' at the Valencia. 

"Too Much Johnson" is an old friend. We have had this very 
funny Gillette fane in all sorts of productions, from the 
presentation at the old Baldwin, by Gillette himself, down. The 
Valencia Theatre is giving the rattling, smile-coercing affair in 
more than merely satisfactory fashion. Tt may be said that for 
a stock company presentation at popular prices this one is 
away up in G. It is a howling, uproarious success in all par- 
ticulars. 

Paul McAllister has the Gillette part of Billings, the imper- 
turbable, who smokes cigars and prevaricates ever, and his char- 
acterization is an admirable one. The others in the cast are all 
good, with Lillian Andrews proving an excellent second to Mc- 
Allister in the creating of fun. Her mother-in-law is a huge 
success. 

"Too Much Johnson" marks tic last production at the hands 
of George Poster Piatt, who has officiated as stage director at 
the Valencia for some time past, and who has done some big 
things, not merely gauged by stock standards. Mr. Piatt left 
this week for the other sub- of the Rockies, where he is to take 
charge of the stage of the New Theatre, an honor worthily be- 
stowed. Best wishes to him. Prosit! 

* * * 

Vaudeville at tin- Orpheum. 

The hold-overs are the best of this week's Orpheum bill, for 
none of the newcomers arc o'erbrilliant. The Gibson Electrified 
Review proves a waste of scenery and costumes, as it is the 
slowest sort of an uninteresting act. and Miss Lily Lena, a Lon- 
don music brill artist, will not set San Francisco afire, despite 
her heralded reputation. The Donals are really remarkable 
strong men. however, who do some amazing stunts. Julius Tan- 
nen, the monologist, who made such a hit on his last appearance, 
proves this time a woeful fiasco. 

Tic Tli roe Leightons arc amusing as last week, Miss Braatz 
juggles blithely. Mi^s Parry and her "The Comslock Mystery" 
are well worth a second visit, and the grand opera in tabloid. 
'"The Patriot," again scores. 

* * * 

ADV. [NOEA NNOUNCEMENTS. 

Sunday afternoon, the American Stock Company will put on 
Bret Harte's famous comedy-drama, "Tennessee's Pardner." 
with Hersehel Mayall as Caleb Swan, and Miss Harriet Worth- 
ington in the title role. Tennessee Kent. In addition to the 
company which appeared last week in "The Duel," Miss Pau- 
lene Lord mil appear as Nettie Bice. Miss Lillian Elliott, 
who, for the past two seasons, was with Ye Liberty Stock Com- 
pany, at Oakland, will make her first appearance with the 
American Stock Company, along with William P. Abrams. 
"The Duel," the stock company's initial production, is reviewed 
in another column. 

The American Theatre will open with the Shubert attractions 
the latter part of August with "Going Some," a farce-comedy. 
Then will follow Augustus Thomas' great play. "The Witching 
Hour," with John Mason and Amelia Gardiner. Corinne in 



"Mile. Mischief," "Girls," and Charles Cherry in "The Bache- 
lor," comedies by Clyde Fitch, George Pawcett in "The Great 
John Ganton," Eddie Foy in a new musical comedy, and Louise 
Gunning in "Marcelle," complete the list of fall attractions. 

* * * 

The last performances of "Too Much Johnson," William 
Gillette's comedy, will take place at the Valencia Theatre this 
Sunday afternoon and evening, and on Monday night "At the 
White Horse Tavern," adapted by Sydney Eosenfeld from the 
German play. "Im Weissel Pocss'l," by Blumenthal and Kalde- 
burg, will be presented here for the first time in several years. 
The customary matinee will be held, and the next attraction at 
the theatre will be "All the Comforts of Home." 

* * * 

The International Grand Opera Company will close its season 
this Sunday night. The programme for this Saturday matinee 
will be "C'avalleria Rustic-ana" and "I'Pagliacci," and this Sat- 
urday evening Mascagni's opera, "L'Amico Fritz," will be given 
for the last time. 

The musical comedy season begins Monday evening, with an 
elaborate production of the London and New York success, "The 
Belle of New York." which will be revived for one week only 
with an excellent cast. The following popular prices will pre- 
vail : Evenings, 25c, 50c, 75c. Saturday and Sunday matinees, 
25c. and .Vic. 

* * * 

"Polly of the Circus," Margaret Mayo's drama, comes to the 
Van Ness Theatre for two weeks, commencing Sunday night. 
It is a spectacular production in three acts and five scenes. One 
scene shows a circus ring in full tilt, with four specialties going 
on at one time, and the other gives a picture of the circus leav- 
ing town in wagons in the moonlight. Ida St. Leon. Earl Ryder, 
David 1!. Young. John Findlav, Charles Lamb, Leslie King, 
Harry Lane, Stuart Johnson are in the cast. 

* * * 

"The Girl and the Judge" is announced as the Alcazar's offer- 
ing throughout the coming week, commencing Monday evening. 
Bessie Barriscale is cast as the Girl, and Thurlow Bergen as the 
Judge, and the other favorites will have well-fitting roles, among 
the characters being a female kleptomaniac, a garrulous board- 
ing house keeper, a funny clerk, and several other types. 

* * * 

Sam Watson's Farmyard Circus, which has been described as 
a treat for children from six .to sixty, will be seen for the first 
time at the Orpheum beginning Sunday. Griff, "the juggling 
jesting joker," assisted by his son, George, will be a feature of 



\ $ 1 2,000 /* 

Marine 

View 

Lot 



45x120 on Green Street through to alley. 
Unobstructed Marine view. 1 block from 
cars. Nothing better in the city. Apply 
Room 16, 773 Market St., San Francisco. 



Jl i.v 24, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



11 



the coming bill. Walter Schvode and Lizzie Mulvey will ap- 
pear in a comedy called "A Theatrical Agency," which is inter- 
spersed with dialogue and singing and (lam-ins. It also affords 
Miss Mulvey an opportunity of wearing a number of stylish 
and handsome costumes. Kerberl and Willing, minstrel come- 
dians, will present their newest skit, "Oh, Man." Next week 
will be the las! of Charles Dana Gibson's Electrified Girl Review, 
.lulius Tannen, the Three Denials, and of Lily Lena. The Or- 
pheuni Motion Pictures, which will conclude the performance, 
will be of special interest. 



loll'rii's says he will fighl Johnson, even if be is a negro. 

There should be no discrimination between brutes on account 

of color in the prize ring nor at the dinner table nor in the draw- 
ing room. , 



Not as an advertisement, but as a statement of fact, San 

Francisco has more and better first class hotels than any other 
of the world's great cities. Step right up to the desk and regis- 
ter. This invitation is without limit. 



The now Chutes in Fillmore street will give double perform- V(Mi€7lC%(]i ThSQ/tVC 
ances next Sunday. The concert programmes will be lengthened 
both afternoon and night, and the sensationalists will give four 
exhibitions in place of two. The music of the Royal Banda 
Roma will be a feature of Sunday's programme. Sirignano will 
direct at both concerts. The selections will include the "Sextet" 
from "Lucia." airs from "Faust," and three brilliant marches 
composed by the director — "The American Girl," "Adele," and 
"Regards to San Francisco." All of the soloists will be heard. 
Mine. Ermin Arnoldc. soprano, will sing arias from "Rigoletto" 
and "Faust," and several popular selections. All of the open- 
air attractions, which have drawn thousands of patrons to the 
Fillmore street park during the pasl week, will also lie seen. 



Valencia Street, between 13th and 14th 
Telephone. Market 17 

This Saturday and Sunday evenings. Last times of TOO MUCH 

JOHNSON. 

Commencing Monday night, another deiighftul comedy, 

AT THE WHITE HORSE TAVERN. 
An international success, with PAUL. MCALLISTER and all of 
the Valencia favorites. 

Wednesday matinees, 25c; Saturday and Sunday matinees, Inc.. 
25c, 35c. 50c, Evening prices — 25c. to SI. 00. 
Seats on sale at. the Emporium. 
Next— ALL THE COMPORTS OF HOME. 

New Alcazar Theatre c ° r "" s z:r£" nta 

Belasco & Mayer. Owners and Managers. Absolutely Class A Bids 
Monday evening. Julv 25th. and throughout the week, finest of 



The play of "Cameo Kirby," in which Dustin Farnum has 

made a success, is said to suit the popular star even better than 
did "The Virginian," in which he was so well cast. His portrayal 
of the principal role in the new play has been highly commended 
on all sides. 



Julv 25th, 
the Clyde Fitch comedies, 

THE GIRL AND THE JUDGE. 
Cream of the Alcazar Company in the east. 
Prices — Night, 25c. to $1. Matinees, 25c. to 50c. 
MATINEE SATURDAY AND SUNDAY. 



American Theatre 



Market St. near Seventh. Phone Market 381 

The playhouse of comfort and safety 

July 25th. AMERICAN STOCK 



Wagenhals & Kemper's big production of Eugene Waller's 
drama, "Paid in Full." will he the attraction to follow "Polly 
of the Circus" a( the Van Ness Theatre. Its limited engagement 

lasl season was one of tin 1 sensations of the year, and theatre- ~^Tj ~p{ j 

goers will welcome the return performance with open arms, .is J^ CW \Jr7) tbeiiLTYb 2 
thousands were unable to secure seats. 



Commencing Sunday matinee 
COMPANY in 

TENNESSEE'S PARTNER. 
Herschal Mayall, Harriet Worthington. and a carefully selected 
company of players. 

Special summer prices — Evenings. 26c, 50c. and 75c. Math s, 

25c. and 50c. All reserved. 



Farrell Street, 
Bet. Stockton and Powell. 



Booth Tarkinglon's play, "Cameo Kirby," will lie played here 

by Dustin Farnum al the Van Ness Theatre next month. The 

young romantic actor is said to have achieved the greatesl success 

id' his career in this plav. 

. * * * 

Blanche [laics, who has nol appeared her.-' iii over four years, 
is coming lo the Van Ness Theatre with her latest triumph, 

"The Fighting Hope." Miss Bates was last seen here in "The 

Darling id' the Gods," at the Grand Opera Bouse. 

* * * 

Henry B. Harris has decided lo resume the inn of "The Third 
Degree" al the Hudson Theatre, Xeu York, on AllgUSl 16th. II 
comes Wesl alter its run there, and "ill he the attraction at lie 

Van Ness during Portola week, 

* * * 

A special train of Beveral cars is required to bring tb 
production of "Polh of the Circus" to this city. 



Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre in America. 

Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matin avery day. 

ARTISTIC VAUDEVILLE 
s:.\M WATSON'S FARMYARD CIRCUS: GRIFF, London's Favor- 
ite Juggling Jesting Johnnie, assisted b> George; SCHRODE and 
MULVEY; HERBERT and Willing CHAS. DANA GIBSON'S 
ELECTRIFIED GIRL REVIEW; JULIUS TANNEN; :: uoNALS; 
NEW ORFHEUM MOTION PICTURES. Last Wei 
,l..iis hit LILT LENA, The Dainty English Singer in new. Dainty 
Story So 

Evening prices- iOi . 76c. Hex seats. II. 

Matin- Pi I Sundays and holidays), toe, S6c, 50c 

PHONE DOUGLAS 7" 



Van Ness Theatre 



CORNER VAN NESS AVE. 
AND GROVE STREET. 



Phone Market 500 

night, July 26th ■ nl Limited to two 

weeks, Matlne< Saturday. Frederic Tl 

.in. 1 .if New v.trk's greatest dramatic sui 

POLLY OF THE CIRCUS. 

By Margaret Mayo. year New York. 

Early attractions— "Paid in Full." Dustin Farnum, Blanche 



New Chutes ™™<e-™y 



Turk and Webster 



Our < 'ouniry < 'ousin. 

An upper Wesl Side girl »;is discussing the family's summer 
plans. "I'm awfullv glad we're 'i"i to \isit relatives i ! 
son," she said. "I've become so tired itions which 

attend efforts to entertain country cousins in the winter, in re- 
turn. My brother doesn'l look at ii thai way, however. He's 
the '>nl\ member of the Family who likes thai sorl of business • 
tiiul the reason's not far lo seek. The country girl not on!' 
up to him as no city oi r ] does, hut she's grateful for any sort of 
ml can'l loll the difference, anyhow. He'll 
spend $1 on her and gratitude; while if ho 

spends $.', on a city girl he's lucky to get 50 cents' worth of 
gratitude. Now, isn't that just like a nun?" — .V. )'. r, 



Ev.-ry afternoon and night, i: aken the popular 

CHUTES JOY JAUNT? 

300.000 people have been 

nd hear DESPERADO, In his leap for life: FLORENCE 
SPRAT, the girl In the white tights; DEMON, in a ride t 

1 Hi. ROYAL BANDA ROMA, led lev the seintillatlng 
features for the children. 



Princess Theatre 



Poddy was Bowing potatoes in his garden, when Lord 

A came along. Lord A . evidently wishing I 

Paddy's knowledge of the different < called 

oui in an authoritative tone : 

"1 Bay, Paddy, what sort of potatoes are you sowing there?" 
Paddy, not caring In lei his lordship have the b • of the 

joke, politely touching his hat. replied: "Ban lord- 

ship." — London Til-! 



ELLIS ST.. NR. FILLMORE 

Class A Theatre. 

S. Loverich, Manager Phone Wesl 663 

LAST TWO NIGHTS GRAND OPERA SEASON. 
Matu - CAVELLER1A Ftr STIC AN A and IPAti- 

LIACCI; Saturday aighl L'AMlCO FRITZ. Sunday night, fare- 
well | - I ol All 'A third a>t LUCIA, seennd 
art IL TRI hird aet L'AMICO FRITZ, third act LA 
BIACONDA. 

3. $i. $1.50. $; 
Beginning m ty night— THE BELLE OF NEW YORK. 

Popn: trday and Sunday 

matin- 

Murphy Grant & Company 

Wholesale Dry Goods 
N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 

New Goods constantly arriving and on sale. 



13 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 24, 1909 







OTBTX 



..^ 




/^ 



Society has refrigerated its dramatic talent for many months, 
but is now ready to take it out of the ice box perfectly intact and 
thoroughly congealed. The process of thawing out is to take 
place under the" auspices of Mrs. Gus Taylor. Mrs. Will Taylor 
and Mrs. Fred McNear. These three dashing sisters are going 
to give a vaudeville entertainment, and already the young people 
who are to play are rehearsing. Mrs. McNear is the only one 
of the hostesses who will take part, as neither of her sisters have 
ever been caught toying with dramatic ambition. 

Amateur theatricals are bully fun. and were thoroughly ac- 
credited as a society pastime, long before tin- knights made round 
tables the mode in Arthurian England. Even those who have 
not read the ingenious love intrigues of the "Duchess" know 
that an English country house that does not provide for theatri- 
cals does not meet the building requirements of English society. 
An English girl who, at some time or another in her life, has 
not fixed her blushes for the footlights, is more extinct than 
the Dodo. Every well-born English girl sketches, if she does 
not pencil her eyebrows. She may not be keen on perspective, 
but alwavs she does "lovelv" water colors and likewise she "play- 
acts." 

Which is delicious fun, and 1 am glad that our girls have 
taken to theatricals and have cut out the ubiquitous sketch 
hook, the eternal presence of which blights the scenery of rural 
England. But I do wish that our girls would hug closer to the 
attitude of the English amateur actress. Instead of remaining 
in an amateur state of mind, several of our society girls attitudi- 
nize about their dramatic ability and take themselves very seri- 
ously. There have been some very creditable amateur perform- 
ances given here in recent years, and the newspapers in their 
kindness, both to the object of the charity and the performers, 
have polished up their politest adjectives for the cast. Possibly 
the unrestrained praise which has been splashed around has 
worked the harm. For example, the Kirmess was thoroughly 
pleasing and naturally uninspired. Why should society people 
show as talented toes as professionals? But the flatterers in- 
sisted that the Marsouvian dance was better than that given in 
any Merrjf Widow production. And now comes the genuine 
Widow and proves that it was only receptive dough without 
yeast. For straight dramatic work there are several young 
society women who strike sparks, but could never kindle a 
flame. But one young woman, in particular, has been made to 
think that, by Allah, she is Nazimova hersel E. 

So I am very glad that there are to be some theatricals for 
private pleasure only, and the newspapers will not pad out their 
compliments unduly. Too much publicity is bad for amateur 
actors — it tinges the enthusiastic enjoyment of the frolic into 
the make-believe world with a professional seriousness that 'is 
obviated only by a strong sense of humor. Fortunately, Mrs. 
Fred McNear, one of the hostesses at the coming affair, lias a 
very robust sense of humor. She is one of those who have gone 
through a baptism of flattery and come out unspoiled, with a 
gratifying knowledge that the stage is not absolutely creaking 
for her to tread upon it. 

A friend at Tahoe writes me that the country houses around 
the lake have an endless chain of simple hospitality that is in 
charming contrast to the formal life in the Burlingame country 
homes. People have learned that an excess of servants are an 
impediment to summer joy, and no one on the lake has more in 
help than actually demanded. Butlers are not in evidence, and 
long, tiresome dinners are taboo. Even the Fred Kohls, who 
always keep up a magnificent establishment at Burlingame, are 
leading the simple life at Idlewild, and Mrs. Kohl and her 
house-guest, Mrs. Eugene Murphy, spend the entire day in high 
boots and outing togs, making of dinner dress a necessity, not 
an elaborate rite only to be approached in reverent spirit. The 
Kohls have some marvelous records for their gramophone, and 
they usually take it along on the launch. 

The engagement of Miss Nora Brewer, of Burlingame, to Ed- 



FAIRMONT HOTEL 

A notable example of good hotel 
keeping — the result of forty years 
experience and study. 
Rates from $2.50 per day upward. 
Every room with bath. 

TTnder the management of 



^ 



^ 



Palace Hotel Company 



J 



ward T. Cudahy, the son of the great packer, is an event that 
has cast its shadow before ever since the day that Mrs. Jack 
Casserly's brother met Miss Nora, who is as fascinating as the 
delightful Nora of the Turquoise Cup. The "Brewer girls," as 
Amy and Nora are always called, are clever, capable girls, who 
do not drone away their lives in idleness. Nora's engagement to 
Edward Cudahy is considered an ideal match, and those who 
gathered at the dinner, which Mrs. Van Ness gave in honor 
of her niece, beamed happiness over the affair. Miss Nora is a 
special protege of the new society leader, Mrs. Alexander, and is 
frequently the guest of Miss Harriett Alexander on her visits 
to town. The wedding is to be an event of early winter. 

Miss Marian Zeile, who will be a debutante of next season, 
will probably steal a march on her sister debutantes by being 
honored with some sort of a coming-out function this summer. 
Her cousin, Miss Florence Hopkins, has had week-end parties 
ever since Miss Marian arrived from New York, and with 
Mary Keeney completing the trio, these three can be Been driv- 
ing, riding and motoring around Menlo Park, and a fascinating 
picture they make. Marian Zeile has grown like Jack's bean- 
stalk since she went to New York to school, and rivals her cousin. 
Mrs. Gus Taylor, in inches. 

A number of people have chosen August for their out-of- 
state jaunts. The Pemi P. Schwerins and Miss Maud O'Connor 
will sail for Honolulu on the 21-th. and another party of friends 
are planning a Tahiti trip. Miss Erna St. Goar and her mother 
will sail for Europe in August, and Miss Elsa Draper is already 
on her way to New York to join her father, who has engaged ac- 
commodations on one of the fast steamers. Her summer in 
Europe will be largely devoted to the purchase of a trousseau. 

Among a number of smart after-theatre parties that have been 
given at the St. Francis since the "Merry Widow" was a supper 
given a few evenings ago by Mrs. Horace Blanchard to a num- 
ber of young friends whom she had previously entertained at a 
box party in honor of her daughter Ysabel. 

William Dempster and G. P. Dempster, of Glasgow, Scotland, 
who are touring the world, have arrived at the St. Francis for 
a sojourn in San Francisco. 

Through the initiative of the Down-Town Association, it has 
been arranged to have the Golden Gate Band play every after- 
noon in Union Square Park. The first concert of the series was 
given last Saturday, and proved a notable success, bringing 
throngs of people to the center of town and creating the picture 
of gay, care-free crowds that has always been one of the pleas- 
antest and most characteristic sights of San Francisco. The 



BLANCO 


9 


s 


O'FARRELL AND LARKIN STREETS 






PHONE FRANKLIN 9 






No visitor should leave the city without seeinj 


j the 


finest cafe in America. Our new annex 


is 


now 


open. 







Jdly 24, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



13 



music rendered is of a very high order, but in a city which 
supports its Italian grand opera throughout a considerable 
part of the year, it receives its full meed of appreciation from 
the public. 

Among the charming young society gii-ls in Pacific Grove 
for the summer is Miss Alexander Levy, whose mother, Mrs. 
Joe Levy, owns a pretty bungalow in one of the most sightly 
spots near the shore. Mrs. Levy is here, and Mr. Levy runs down 
occasionally for a week-end stay with his family. Miss Hilda 
Herber, a San Jose Notre Dame convent girl, and resident of 
San Francisco, is spending her vacation with the Frederic 
Southerlands, whose artistic home is located on the second 
street up from the shore line ; Miss Nellie Ord, daughter of 
Major Ord, U. S. A., retired, is a guest of Mrs. J. P. Pryor; 
Miss Marguerite Sheridan and Miss Mildred Van Gulpin are be- 
ing entertained by Miss Eva Ball, herself just home from the 
last of boarding school days at Miss Snell's, with Miss Katherine 
Cornish, daughter of Major Cornish, a retired U. S. army officer, 
who resides here, forming a coterie of young women who are 
devoted to outdoor sports, which, here, include rowing, swim- 
ming, driving, trolley riding and tennis, with, for evening pas- 
time, clam and mussel bakes, picnics, parties and hops, at the 
Presidio. 

The past week has witnessed one of the largest influx of 
travelers in the year's history of San Francisco. Not only have 
the visitors who attended the Elks' Convention in the south 
been arriving on every train, but the trans-Pacific steamers have 
been arriving with full passenger lists. All this in addition 
to the immense tourist business from the East, which keeps 
coming every day to see this, the "Wonder City of the Age." 
Naturally, the Fairmont has been filled to capacity each day, 
and thousands of the visitors will go back to their homes with 
anew and better idea of San Francisco because of the wonderful 
panoramic view which they obtained from the windows and ter- 
races of this hotel. 

List of guests registered at Hotel Rafael last week : Miss Har- 
riet Gerber, C. H. Weaver, Daisy Mercereau, E. II. Wiel, J. 
Friedlander, Robert D. Cohn, II.' H. Yard and family, C. G. 
Wharton and wife, C. P. Coburn, II. E. Fox, Mrs. W. T. Winch- 
man, A. M. Loomis, W. B. Hopkins, Mrs. Thomas Breese, Mis. 
F. W. McNear, Mrs. W. H. Taylor. Jr., Mis. <'. < ). Fordi and 
wife, Mr. J. J. Connor and wife, W. L. Weinner, A. M. Rosen- 
stein, Walter Dreyfus, W. 11. Wear and wife, David S, Bachman. 

It has been suggested by some prominenl bridge players of 
Southern California that a bridge congress should he held at 
Del Monte during the soil' and tennis tournaments in \iijn- 
aiid September. Many of the golf and tennis cracks ari 
tees of the modem card game, and plaj 

Aniens tin' prominenl lodges of Klks who canie as a body to 

the Fairmont may 1 te ined the Newark, \. J. Lodg 

Jersey City and Eoboken Lodges, the Boston, \<« Haven and 
Brooklyn Lodges, Exalted Ruler J. 0". Sammis and his party, 
and many others. 

Hundreds of Elks came in to Del Monte on Friday, Saturday 
ami Sunday. site] taking the Seventeen Mile Drive and enjoy- 
ing a meal or two at the hotel, thev proceeded OD their ■■■. 

Recent arrivals amen- the "Sei - ' of Army ami Navy 
people »lie make the Fairmont their home while in San Fran- 
cisco include Dr. ami Mrs. B. R. Stitt, FJ. S. V: E. W. Ricb- 
miiih ami Mrs. Richmuth, is. \.: Lieutenants E. P. .Tessop 
and Littlefield, U. S. N.;C. A. "Woodruff, 1 S. V ; I B. Mar- 
row, 1'. S. \.; Dr. ami Mrs Henry Stevens K rated, r. S. A. 

\ lun.heon party at Hotel Del Monte on the 12th was made 
up of B. C. Smith and Mrs, C. S. S . Mr. 

and Mis. Charles E. siration and Mi^- Doroth] Strattan of 
Erie, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Bachman, with Arthur Bachman. Jr.. 
and Fraulino Meyer, of San E Uonte for a 

two or thl 

YV. 11. Johnson. V. S. A.. Mrt. Johnson, J. H. Johnson, of 
Minneapolis, and E. II. Andres, U. S. A., 'lined at Pel Monte 
on the 11th. 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Gough Streets 

-citable, hisrh order, uptown hotel, now under the manage- 
ment of THOMAS H. SHEDDEN. formerly manager of St. 
art's. 



Rear-Admiral and Mrs. Trilley, of Shawniut Lodge, Pacific 
Grove, took luncheon at Del Monte on Sunday. 

(Continued to Page H.) 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

UNION SQUARE 

The spirit of good service 

and the facilities that 

produce it. 

Under the management of JAMES WOODS 



HOTEL VICTORIA 

N. E. cor. Bush and Stockton 

Centrally Located 

A Modern and Up-To-Date Family Hotel. 
Sun in Every Room. Elaborate Furnish- 
ings. Excellent Cuisine. Large Lobby and 
Reception Room. Grill Room. Dining Room 

MRS. W. F. MORRIS. Proprietor, formerly of Hotel Cecil, 
Bush Street, San Francisco 

European and American Plan 



Hotel Rafael 



San Rafael, Cal. 



Under the management of J. H. HOLMES 

formerly of Hotel Green. Pasadena 



Buy tickets and check baggage direct to San Rafael. 
Special attention given to Touring parties. 



Hotel Del Monte 

Annual Golf 
TOURNAMENT 

August 28th to September 4th, inclusive. 

One of the great golf events of the year. 
Make your plans to be there. Entries should be 
made early. 

H. R. WARNER. Manager. 



Hotel Westminster 



Los Angeles, Cal. 

Fourth ud Mais Stt 



American Plan 

REOPENED 

Rates per Day. $2.50 Rooms without Bath. 
Rooms with Bath. $3.00. $3.50 and $400. 

European Plan 

II. 00 per day and up 
With bath. $1.60 and up 



F O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 84, 100!) 




(Continued from Page IS.) 

Society is wrought up over the Portola Festival. The dra- 
goon guard of. one hundred six foot sons having been disposed 
of in a way, there comes the question of the maids of honor to 
the queen. Who are they to be? The maids and matrons are 
wondering not a little anxiously how they are to I"' chosen — 
whether the qualifications are to be beauty, wealth, brains or 
lineage, or a close combination of all four for each maid. 

Queen Virgilia. the consort of Don Gaspar (the captain of 
dragoons, who suddenly arises as a king from the obscurity into 
which he had sunk after discovering San Francisco bay, and so 
starting things a-going), is the proud possessor of a long and 
distinguished genealogical tree. 

The queen is also large, statuesque, most divinely tall. Will 
she desire to be surrounded bj Amazons, or will she prefer to 
accentuate her queenly stature and dignity by contrasl with 
petite and vivacious maidens? 

As all the brilliant functions to be held during festival iveel 
will be under court patronage, the desirability of the position as 
a dazzlingly gowned maid of honor to the queen, becomes at once 
apparent, and the question arises as to what method will prevail 
in making these appointments, 'those who enjoy the friendship 
of the fascinating Miss Boguc at the pros. ait are hoping that she 
will appoint her own maids, while there are those who believe 
that the committee, or some particular member of it, should 
choose the fair maidens who will <it beside the throne. And 
there are still other opinions. Am! so society is in a flurry over 
the question. 

The following San Franciscans are at Tallac. Lake Tahoe: 
Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Rowley, A. Watkins, Xat Boas. Ben Boas, 
II. G. Sheideman, Dr. .1. B. Tufts and wile. .1. ji. McCollough, 
Mrs. L. O'Brien, Mr. and Mi's. Win. Macdonald, Miss L. O'Neill, 
Miss Alice O'Neill, Dr. David Cohn and wife, Miss Edith Colin. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jno. J. Barrett. R. II. Kmuse. Mr. ami Mrs. Henry 
Kahn. If. Alcovieh ana wile. M. II. Pencovic and wile. Mr-. I. 
I.. Rosenthal, Miss Marion E. Rosenthal, Mis? E. E. Rosenthal, 
Mi- Kaspar, Mrs. S. M. Phillips. Mr. and Mrs. M. 1 >. Green, 
Herta Blanckenburg, E. E. Tutthill, Mr. and Mrs. Jorgensenj 
Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Clemens, Miss Delia Clemens. 

Among the arrivals on the steamer Tenyo Maru, registered at 
the Fairmont are F. Dierig, ('. Da I'ra. of Oberammergau, G ir- 

inaiiy: C. Erich, Golde, Alteheide, Germany; Col I rt&we, 

Dr. and Mrs. R. Payne. Tarien, China; Thos. Devlin. Dr. A. .1. 
Devlin, .Tames II. Crumbie, Philadelphia. 

Colonel R. Dirkins. U. S. A., Mrs. 1!. Dirkins, Mrs. 11. \V. 

Wight and Mrs. J. M. K i of Mare Island, spent some d 

I lei Monti' last week. 

Arrivals at Castle Crags Farm from San Francisco: Mr. and 
Mrs. K. G. Hooker. Mr. and Mrs. Wakefield Baker. Mis? Eelen 
Baker. Miss Marian Baker. Miss Marian Maillard, Mrs. Mai II 
Smith. Mr. and Mrs. I. R. D. Grubb, Mr. D. Hanson Grubb, Mr. 
and Mrs. Howard II. ffogan, Miss Judith B. Hogan, Mr. II. 
Ollerdessen, Miss Ada Goldsmith, Miss Bertha Goldsmith, Miie 
Laura Lewis. Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Spader, Miss Genevieve Spinier, 
Master Randolph Spader, Mrs. E. L. E. Meyer. Jr., two children 
and nurse, Miss Laura Taylor, Mrs. F. S. Judah, Mrs. Louise J. 
Fenkhausen, Mrs. K. H. Fenkhausen, Miss Edith Barry, Mr. L. 
IT. Loughery, Miss L. E. Winterburn, Miss Evelyn Evans, Miss 
Kate W. Stoney, Misses Florence. Frances and Kathrine Stoney, 
Mrs. E. C. Long, child and maid. Miss Marjorie Shepard, Misfi 
Myrtle M. Yound, Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Bogart, Mr. A. .1. Buck- 
ley, Dr. F. J. Lane, Dr. Geo. H. Evans. Mr. H. E. E. Meyer, dr., 
Mr. A. s. Haskell, Mrs. C. Bush. Miss E. Shane, Mr. Barry, Mr. 
C. H. House. Mr. and Mrs. Dudley G. Kierulf. child and nurse, 
Miss Ivc Can-. Mrs. Elizabeth Gerberding, Miss Beatrice Cm- 
herding. Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Shepard. Lieut. W. I'. Currier, 
D". S. A.. Mrs. E. IE Hart, child and maid. Miss M. Maguire, 
Miss Elsie Guthrie, Miss A. Luesman. 



Preparing for the Month of Sport* at Del Montr. 

A very keen interest is being taken among the amateur golf 
and tennis players in the announcement of the dates for '"the 
month of sport- at Hotel Del Monte. The golf tournament will 



open August 38th and close September 4th. In addition to the 
usual competitions, which include handicap match play for the 
Del Monte Cup for men, and the Del Monte Cup for women, 
with trophies for winners and runners-up. mixed foursomes and 
consolation handicaps for men and women, there will be the tirsl 
contest for the Del Monte championship in scratch match play 
and a team match between Northern and Southern California 
teams. Vincent Whitney, who won the honors in golf last year, 
will defend them this season. 

Mis< May Sutton, the champion woman tennis player of the 
world, will also be there. This, by the way. may be Miss Sut- 
ton's last appearance in tournament, as her plans in regard to 
tennis playing after marriage with Mr. Hani, id' Mexico, are not 
yel settled. The tennis games begin September 5th ami end 
September loth. 

Another event which will attract many is the annual 
show, which is to lie held August 20th and 21st, under the 
pices of the Ladies' Kennel Association. 

In addition to these sports, the Pacific Improvement Com- 
pany announces that Pebble Beach Lodge — a unique resort and 
i luh house, which it is building at Pebble Beach on the Seven- 
teen Mile Drive, will be ready early in August. The opening 
of this will he an event of great importance, and the company is 
planning a number of attractive features in this connection. 



dog 

IUS- 



TIII-: PILGRIMAGE. 



road, 



I made a pilgrimage to find (he Cod: 
I listened for his voice at holy tombs. 
Searched lor the print of his immortal feet 
In dust of broken altars; yet turned back 
With empty heart. But on tin- homeward 
A great light came upon me. and I heard 
The God's voice singing in a nesting lark: 
Felt his sweet wonder in a swaying rose: 
Received his blessing from a wayside well: 
Looked on bis beauty in a lover's face; 
Saw his bright hand send signal from the sun. 

— lulu-iii Miirl:lniiii in Tin XautillU. 



Of the four political parties having announced their ticket 

for the primary election, not one of them recommends Francis J. 
Honey for District Attorney. For tin- affront, no doubt he will 
'line ,,|| concerned ill passing him by indicted for not knowing 
ii good thing when they see it. However, he i- running on his 
own hook as a public necessity. 

"() wail some Power the giftie gie us 

To see oursels as ithers see us ! 
It wad frae mimic a blunder free us, 

An' foolish notion." 

The above verse was written by a Scotchman by the name of 

R. Burns, and he dedicated it "To a Louse." 



Certain citizens of Japan who are just now conducting a 

labor strike in Hawaii asserted their immunity from tl pera- 

tioti of Yankee-made laws a lew days ago by capturing and lock- 
ing up the sherilf of Honolulu for attempting to preserve order 
and protecting property. "But a nation of gentlemen," as 
Roosevelt would put it. has privileges, don't you know. 



A Domestic Eye Remedy, 



Compounded by Experienced Physicians. Conforms to Pure Food and 
Drugs Laws. Wins Friends Wherever Used. Ask Druggists for Murine 
Eye Remedy. Try Murine In Tour Eyes. You Will Like Murine. 



THE PENINSULA 

The big. first-class hotel that is only half an hour's ride from 
San Francisco. 

THE PENINSULA 



The leading suburban hotel of central California, with the 
splendid reputation for service, table and general conditions. 

THE PENINSULA 



The hotel with all the comforts that the most fastidious could 
desire. Special rates in tne bachelors' quarters. 

JAS. H. DOOLITTLE, Manager, San Mateo, Cal. 



July 84. 1009 



and California Advertiser 



15 



3ln tk}t JInltttral Arena 



There is no longer any doubt that Secretary of State Charles 
Curry is a candidate for Governor. He waited until the Gov- 
ernor decided what he would do, and although there has been no 
official statement from His Excellency on the subject, there is 
no doubt but that Gillett does not expect to remain at Sacra- 
mento after January, 1911. The fait is, and Gillett's friends all 
understand it, that the Governor has never cared for his job. He 
has had a good deal of sickness in his family since, he went to 
Sacramento, and it is openly whispered that he does not like 
Sacramento as a place of residence any more than did Gage or 
Budd before him. The people, too, of Sacramento, assume the 
right to dictate who shall be Governor, and if their wishes are 
not endorsed by the State they show their resentment against the 
unfortunate victor at the polls. Sacramento wanted Pardee, 
because Pardee liked Sacramento, and they have never taken very 
cordially in the Capitol City to Pardee's defeat. They have en- 
dured Gillett, but they have never welcomed him. They have not 
refused to bow to him on the streets, but they have not gone wild 
over his receptions as they did over Pardee's, and so the Gov- 
ernor would prefer a home more congenial than the town up the 
river. He has established a law office with his old Eureka part- 
ner in this city, and will practice law if he has to when he goes 
out of office at Sacramento, but he hopes he will not have to. 
What Gillett really wants is to go to the Senate in the place of 
Perkins. It is whispered that the senior Senator, whose health, 

10 say the least, is poorly, will probably resign before his term is 
up, and anyway he will certainly not run again. Gillett would 
like his place, and there is no doubt that hi' can bring consider- 
able pressure to bear to land him in Perkins' shoes. Mrs. Gillett 
prefers Washington to Sacramento, also, and so do the Gillett- 
ettes. if the Governor were Governor when the Perkins vacancy 
occurred, he could not go lo Washington, since he could not 
appoint himself, neither could he be a candidate before ihi Legis- 
lature under the Constitution tor Hie place. He prefers, there- 
fore, to be a private citizen at that psychical moment in politics, 
and that is why he is not a candidate lor another term as Gov- 
ernor. 

The rest of the State officials are all candidates tor re-election, 
and there an' several who would like to aucc 1 Currj a- Secre- 
tary of State. There is Frank Jordan of Oakland, who is al- 
ivail\ on his campaign. Then there is Kid Hilbourn, who has 

been Secretary of the Senate ever since Prank Brand 

to private life, and there is Jake Stafford, who has been ser- 
geanfc-at-arms of the Assembly since the mind of man runneth 
not to tho contrary. Senator Price, of Sonoma i as also 

been mentioned for the place, and the lisl continues to 

1 1 promises to be the Liveliest light of the State election at the 
primaries. 



.I.V UNRIVALED DRY GOODS STORE. 

The opening of the City of Paris on last Thursday was 
an occasion for the display ol the fines) fabrics from tho looms 
of the world in our of the most beautiful 

Tl (feci of ni 1 ,r -non by visitor and visited was marvelous 

in tho extreme. Throngs o - id out in holiday 

raiment, visited the various departments all day and commented 
on tho masterpieces exhibited from the ground Moor to tho upper 
galleries. The feature of this magnificent bazaar of fashion is a 
great central court, designed on a happy mixture of architecture 
with the Marie Antoinette predominant. 

color scheme is ivory and gold, and the great seal of the 
rmounts the whole in soft tints of light . 
pale sea green and amber ■ Of litis more anon. S 

iv that San Francisco has mine into its own, and that the 
thousands « ay of exquisite coin 

and business enterprise did not at the mem- 

ory of it »ill dwell with them always. San Francisco - 

if an unrivaled dr\ v. Won 

in. all dav long, visited the apartments for the display 
of evening gowns, and glutted their sen-- in 
the shimmering ms. Th( 

! in irrepi ■ . and were in themsi 

hibit of the rare good judgment of th, 



HAVE YOU EVERf 

Does your lot in life content you? Are they coming as you like? 

Arc you satisfied with just a daily wage? 
When your barber shop is idle or your hands are on a. strike 

Have you ever thought of writing for the stage ? 

Perhaps you are a plumber, and it's rather dull in summer; 

Some congenial task your leisure might engage, 
While you're waiting for an order to repair a broken pipe 

Have you ever thought of writing for the stage? 

Or perhaps you arc a tinsmith, or a janitor mayhap, 

Or a writer for a daily printed page. 
Whatever be your station or your daily occupation, 

Have you ever thought of writing for the stage? 

Improve each idle minute. There is fame and fortune in it, 

Yon may be the georgemcohan of your age. 
Nearly everybody tries it, so we venture to advise it. 

Have you ever thought of writing for the stage? 

— Chicago Tribune. 



QUAIL PUBLIC BENEFACTORS. 

That quail are a direct benefit to the farming interest was 
again clearly demonstrated a few days ago. The craw of a 
quail was opened and found to be stuffed with chinch bugs, per- 
haps a thousand or more beiug contained in the receptacle. If 
the killing of quail were discontinued it stands to reason that 
no more failures of corn and wheat crops from the bug nuisance 
would result in the future. The value of birds to agriculturists 
is becoming more recognized each year, and it is up lo the tann- 
ers to demand of the next legislature that stringent laws he en- 
acted prohibiting the killing of quail, prairie chickens ami 
pheasants. 



i 'oust ience Smote Him. 

Wearily Ferdinand the frayed trudged up the garden path, 
and took oil' his hat to the woman at the door. She eyed him 

keenly, and a quick flash of recognition passed over her counte- 
nance. "I k here." ahi -aid. "you call at this house in the 

depth of last winter." "I did. ma'am," he sorrowfully ad- 
tnitted. "Ami I gave you a good square meal mi condition that 

von swept (he snow oil' iek-yanl." "That's right. 

ma'am." "And when you had the meal you sneaked oil' without 
doing it." Ferdinand passed the back of his band tremulous!} 

over his eyes. "Yes, m'ain." he -aid brokenly, "and in 

science smote i ■■ he scurvy trick. Thafs why I've tramped 

all the way back under the scorching sun lo liiiisi, the job." — 
Saturday Journal. 



Pl>°n« Fr.nkli 



MAYERLES GERMAN EYEWATER IS 

• simple and perfectly harmless Ere Kccne-ly, for children and 
adulu 

OFFICE CHIEF OF POLICE. San Fraaosco —It gi*a* me groat pleas- 
ure l.. recommend lo the public Mr 0~ rjr* Mayerle of 960 Market St . 
San Francisco I bare been ontif glasses for the past I weir* years 
and daring that time have consulted several optician* t.nt B) 
had consulted Mr Dears;* Mayerle and had bun Gl fHsMMfl |o my ey-s 
did I gel entire aattsfarti.-.n Hmt r^.pertftilly. 

J H A KHERSON. Sergeant of Police 
IT IS MARVELOl'S. Tbe effect of Mayerle'i Eye Water has been 
marvelous aad I shall recommend il as lb* peer of all eye remedies 
Yours truly. P KBLLT. Alameda County tl'tptfai. San Leaadro. Cal 

Graduate German Expert Optician, charter member American 
f Opt Irian i MO Market Street. oppoeiU Hale's 
MATfcfU.ES HERMAN EYE WATER. By Mail. «.** 




George Mayerle J 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone, Douglas 4300 



MOVED 



Gladding, McBean & Co. 

Offic*: 311-317 CROCKER BtlLDeVG SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 

Wirtbout: 147. 151 MINNA STREET. Ikiiifa N>w Montgonrn •"<) Third 



CLAY 
PRODUCTS 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 24, 1909 




The affairs of the Union State 
Banks and Banks. and the State Savings and Com- 

mercial banks become more and 
more tangled with every day that passes, and the connection of 
Clarence Grange with both institutions, and with the San Fran- 
cisco Securities Company, the Western National, and the Me- 
tropolis Bank, and the two moribund institutions, is as tangled 
apparently as the surface indications of the bank's conditions 
show. Nobody seems to know exactly where Clarence Grange 
stands in this matter, and it is an unfortunate thing for the 
other financial institutions in which he seems to figure so promi- 
nently that a prompt proof of good character and intentions and 
affiliations is not forthcoming in a substantiated denial of con- 
nection with frenzied finance. Beyond the banks mentioned, 
others in this city are involved. 'Way back in the old legislative 
scandal, Grange came to the fore as the man who is reported to 
have handed to Jordan the package of bribe money so marked 
that its identification sej-ved to send a number of Senators to 
disgrace and jail. Farther back than this are stories of activity 
by Clarence Grange in building societies in Salt Lake. 

Some of these stories are of vaulting ambition and frenzied 
deals, but that Grange is a captain in his line is undeniable, 
although it is doubtful if this is the proper course for the banket 
who hopes to hold the long-continued confidence of the public. 

It was sheerest nonsense to make the to-do the daily papers 
made over the minute book and the absence of Frank V. King- 
ton, and this was shown as soon as Kington appeared on the 
scene. 

Grange's activities, it seems, extended 'way back to that hal- 
cyon time for the budding financier, when bank charters were 
to be had for the asking, and a number of these brought into 
existence the mush-room banks that now line many of our 
thoroughfares with marble columns and gilt signs. The Grange 
ambition was to be a modern Californian John Law. and by dint 
of clever manipulating, he has entrenched himself behind a bul- 
wark of strong names and heavy purses, while he has himself 
made money. At any rate.. the storm center at this writing is 
around Grange, and not around the others who have been pawns 
in the game of rapid finance. It remains to be seen how strong 
a hand this Napoleon of finance is when opposed by the State 
Superintendent of Banks in the carrying out of his duty and 
under the watchful eve of National Bank Examiners, the de- 
positors and stockholders. There is every evidence of liquida- 
tion proceedings under orders from the examiners for one or two 
seemingly strong concerns, and altogether the prospect is one 
that gives cause for much apprehension. As far as affairs are 
disclosed, Clarence Grange does not stand to lose much in the 
'debacle, if anything, but the whole muss is indicative and illus- 
trative of the fact which has often been pointed out in these 
columns that banking is not conducted otherwise than as pawn 
shop and speculation business in San Francisco. We have min- 
ing speculators, bank stock speculators, and railroad stock specu- 
lators masquerading as bankers, who have forgotten in their 
frenzy the fact that the depositors' money is a trust in their 
hands, and that it has not been placed there as a speculation fund 
to be juggled with at will in investments that have only a specu- 
lative or an imaginary future value. By custom, the banker has 
come to think that the stock-holders' and the depositors' money 
is his own. and that he is only remotely responsible to the de- 
positor for the trust. It is time that banking in California once 
again takes its place as a respectable, conservative calling in 
which, under honest management, it would be impossible for a 
banker to become a millionaire, or go to the penitentiary, with- 
in a very few years. 



The affairs of the Gate City Oil Company of Stockton 

have been thrown into the courts for the purpose of ascertaining 
who should conduct the business of the corporation. This oil 
company is a prosperous institution, and it is operated by Stock- 
ton people. It has producing wells in the Kern field. 



It is brought to mind by watching 
Pay as You Enter, the efforts of conductors to collect 

fares between the ferry and Lotta's 
Fountain that the United Railroads loses about fifteen fares be- 
tween these points every time a loaded car leaves the ferry for 
the up-town district on the crowded early morning runs. This 
is not because the conductors do not make an honest effort to 
collect. In fact, some of them become positively feverish in 
their endeavors. 

These losses could be obviated by the very efficient "pay-as- 
you-enter" ears, or by substituting two conductors for one for 
the space of a very few blocks. Three or four extra men to the 
hour would cover this field nireJv. and as each car reached Sutter 
street, the extra man could drop off and ride down to the ferry 
on a down-bound car to take up his activities again as soon as 
the loop is reached. The "pay-as-you-enter" car is the real rem- 
edy, and not until it is adopted will the company stop losing 
money in this maimer. The adoption .of such cars would be a 
financial gain to the company, and a convenience to the public. 



Three Will be 
No Merger. 



According to published reports, 
there is now no intention of a mer- 
ger between the National Bank of 
the Pacific and the Western 
National. Mr. Clarence Grange, who is the vice-president and 
general manager of the Metropolis Trust Company and Savings 
Bank, is quoted as saying that no such action is at present 
contemplated, but that it might possibly occur later on. Mr. 
(i range is connected with the San Francisco Securities Company, 
and this company is dominated by J. II. Spring, Alfred Meyer- 
stein. Clarence Grange, Robert Oxnard, J. B. Stetson, Harry 
Stetson, Gavin McNab, Charles Hagmaier and John W. Keith. 




HIGH GRADE INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

LIST ON REQUEST 

SlltrO & Co., Brokers 



412 Montgomery St., San Francisco 



Established 1868 



Private 'Wire Chicago — New York. 

J. C. WILSON 

f New York Stock Exchange 
Member s Chicago Board of Trade 

t Stock and Bond Exchange, S. F. 
Local and Eastern Stocks and Bonds 



Main Office 

Mills Bide. 

Tal. Kaarny 482 



Branch Office 
Hotel Alexandria 
Los Angelas 



FRANK P. MEDINA, ATTORNEY AT LAW 

of Medina and Griffin. Dissolved, remains at the old address, 812-814 
Claus Spreokels Blder. Patents, Trade Marks, Copyriehts, Patent Liti- 
gation. MANY YEARS EXPERIENCE WITH PATENT OFFICE EXAMINERS. 



Vanderbilt Estates Company 

Gilt Edge Realty Bonds Fir-;! Mortgage 

Apply / 

REALTY EXCHANGE, 1047 PHELAN BUILDING, San Francisco, Cal. 
Home Office— New York City 



July 24, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



17 



The entire State is being raked fore 
Water Rights Bought, aft as with a tine tooth comb. Capi- 
talists have come to realize that 
there is in motion a sentiment looking to the acquirement of 
water rights by cities and towns, and that such rights are, with 
every year, becoming more and more valuable. The fact that 
California is a semi-arid State seems to have suddenly burst upon 
the big financiers with tremendous force. The latest news is 
that of the activity of the California Corporation in having trans- 
ferred the North Fork ditch to the American Water Company. 
This includes the Pair Oaks water distributing system. The 
same conveyance filed transfer of the Fair Oaks distributing 
system to the American Irrigation Company. The North Fork 
ditch carries a water right of 3,000 miners' inches daily at all 
times of the year, even if the amount takes all of the water from 
the river. 



Mrs. Phoebe Hearst is ,to build a 
Mrs. Hearst to Build, modern office building on the lot 

owned by her at the junction of 
Market and Third streets. Mrs. Hearst shows her splendid busi- 
ness sense, if report be true, in finally arriving at the conclusion 
that any farther investment in the Hearst newspapers would be 
disastrous. The new structure will not be devoted to the manu- 
facture of yellow and unreliable news, but will be a substantial 
structure for the production of income from the rental of offices. 
The mortgage loan was arranged by the Hibernia Savings and 
Loan Society. The amount of the loan is $800,000, and this 
money will be used, in addition to other capital, to close the 
ugly gap at the Market street junction with Third. 



Bin for Franchise. 



If the plans of the Greai Western 
Power Company mature, and the 
franchise is put up for bidding by 
the city of Oakland, thai town will have one of the finest" un- 
derground power and light service systems in the world. It is 
proposed by the company to bid in the franchise and to give the 
city two per cent of its gross earnings for all electricity furnished 
within the city limits, and. if it is successful in obtaining fran- 
chise rights for fifty years, work will be commenced within four 
months and completed within three years thereafter. 



Remodeling Shots. 



The Hayward division of the Oak- 
land Traction Company is In have 
ils sh"|>-; and barns remodeled, and 
the improvements are in be large and comprehensive. This 
mine is raused In- the verj greal increase of traffic all along Hie 
line. A double track is to be laid all through the business sec- 
tion, and all the buildings, except tin' power house and foundry, 
will be torn down and rebuilt. In addition, a vasl amount of 
trackage is to be laid in the yards proper. 



• Pedagogues will be exonerated if they refuse to 

mend "Calkins on High Finance" as a suitable text hook for 
school boys. But didn't be get there in great shape, with money 
to spare? 



.1 mCKBL OIOAR. 

It was the boss' birthday. The office-bo; knew it. because he 
had heard the boss' w i. The office boj worshiped the 

boss, and had bought him a birthday present Often he had heard 
the boss say that the only presents 1,,. liked were cigars, providing 
they were 10-eeii! cigars, and lie was worried for fear I 
might not like his present. 

The boss came in and threw open his desk. Lying there he 
saw a small parcel. He opened i^ and found that it contained 
a cigar. He looked at it closely. It was a nickel .agar. 

"Huh!" said the boss, disgustedly. Then he noticed that 
there was writing on the paper. He read : 

"ll.ipv birthday. I didn't buy a ten center 'cause I only had 
a nickel." 

The boss bit the end off the cigar, reached in his pocket and 
drew out a match and lighted the weed. He puffed critically a 
minute. 

"I didn't know they made such good cigars lor a nickel," he 
sank — Kansas City Journal. 

E. B. C0URV0I3IBR, 

Art Dealer. Frame Maker. New store. 131 Sutter street, be- 
tween Stockton and Powell. 



TECHAU tavern 



Cor. Eddy and Powell Sts. 

Cafe and Ladies' Grill 



Rigo 



and His Gypsy Orchestra. Concerts Daily During Shopping Hours 

FROM 3:30 TO 5:00 P. M. 

AND FROM 

6:30 TO 8:30 P. M. 

10:30 TO 1:00 A. M. 

Private Dining Booths and Banquet Rooms on 

Mezzanine Floor. Entrance— No. 4 Eddy St. 

Under the management of A. C. MORRISSON 




New 

Poodle 

Dog 

Restaurant 

and 

Hotel 



N. W. Corner 
Polk & Post Sts. 
San Francisco 

Phone 

Franklin 2960 



For Oysters 
Moraghan's Restaurant 

26 Ellis Street 



Music during dinner. Open Sundays. 







>?r'SO/> . /7/j r^ 




S ^*3i. 


(&JkLSiuniilCu^> 


j^inu*iMmHiimmm& 




mm \ K 


The Leading Restaurant 




■1 


of San Francisco 




^nMH ; 


REGULAR DINNER $1.25 




•mFSSbI Hi 


or A la Carte 




MhaS 


342 Sutter Street San Francisco 







MAISON DOREE HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

151-157 ELLIS STREET. ABOVE POWELL. Ip-to-date Establishment 

Lunch with wine 75c. Dinner with wine $1.25- Music every evening 

Phone Ex. Doujfla> 1040 conned in; all apartments 
Emile Fonteiller. formerly with the Flip: Vidor Laborie: John Dubourdieu, formerly wrih the 
Poodle Dog. 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER. 



1400 to 14SO Fourth St., San Francisco. Telephone Market 301 4 
Private Exchanire Connectine all Departments 

Paper of Every Description 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

S»cceedi*c A- ZeOerbaca & Sow 
Zellerbach Building. S. E. corner Battery and Jackson Streets 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 24, 1909 



iExljtbtttott Sooma tor tlje Display of Jparta (gouma 



Lillian May Troy 



Mrs. Asquith, wife of the Kuglish Prime Minister; has drawn 
a hornet's Dest about her head by her faux pas of turning the 
official home of the Premiere into exhibition rooms for the dis- 
play of French gowns. Invitations were sent out by Mrs* As- 
quith to one hundred of her intimate friends, cordially request- 
ing their presence at No. 10 Downing street, on a certain after- 
noon, to view the very latesi bewitching creations from Paris: 
their line points to be brought to their admiring attention and 
expatiated upon by that dear of a man, Mr. Poiret, the French 
architect of lovely woman's gowns. 

.Mrs. Asquith evidently forgot to consult her husband (or 
maybe she doesn't), but nevertheless she look the needless pre- 
caution of obtaining each and ever} guest's word that they 

wouldn't tell. As the news was in every mor a paper, the 

following day, it is evidenl bow sacredly the ladies kept their 
promises. 

It was a dainty morse] for the anti-Asquith contingent, who 
arc in favor oi a Protective Tariff. The London shop-keepers, 
led by Liberty & Co., of world-whir silk fame, bombarded the 
press and tin- Prime Minister with letters demanding to know 
by what right the official residence of the Premier should be used 
as a demonstrating place for foreign dresses that had been 
brought into England free <>( duty. Pin- shop-keepers held an 
indignation meeting, at wbich they framed a protest against 
Mrs. Asquith's action, and sent a copy to her husband. 

In desperation, Mrs. Asquith called upon M. Poiret to help 
her explain. The wily Frenchman, who hud been receiving col- 
umns of free advertising, promised to smooth all the difficulty 
away, and Mrs. Asquith rested easily for one night, expecting 
to find in the morning papers a most diplomatic and conciliatory 
explanation by the Frenchman. 

And here's what the mean thing said: 

"Parbleu ! Every year I buy tons of silk from Liberty & I '<>.. 
oi England. The silk I make into most fetching -own-, and 
send them back to England, for there are ladies of taste and 
fashion even in London, who could never force themselves to 
wear the dowdy gowns made in England. Alois' I make crea- 
tions. Liberty & (jo. make — well — curtains. Very nice cur- 
tains, I should have said — the silk is good." 

And the Prime Minister i- struggling to find out jus! Iiqw 
many votes ii will cost his party. 

*' * * 

Rose Stahl and "The Chorus Lady." 

Rose Stahl, accompanied by "The chorus Lady." has been 
playing to well-papered houses at the Vaudeville Theatre in 

London. The play has been running two months, and a large 
chosen few, who receive bountifully of passes each week, ba?e 

taken to speculating why she continues i" do it, and also bow 
fast the money is running out of Kosq's pocket. A man who 

bought Ihkd.- the fiisl week claim.- ilia! the ticket seller bit the 
coin ti, see if it was real. Evidently Miss Stahl thought that 

when the season was well on. tiie play would be 'e successful 

and so rehearsed nightly to empty houses. Put not so; the Eng- 
lish public will have none of this portrayal of "The Chorus 
Lady" — they have enough id' them in the nobility at present. 
Mi-s Stahl is credited in "Punch" as having said, relative to a 
requesl for a .-mall subscription to be devoted to saving the Hol- 
bein painting, "The Duchess of Milan" to the English public: 

"Me give $200,000 for a painting for the Britishers to look 
.1 ' i Iheese it!" 

Fanny Ward is another American actress who persists in 
thrusting herself upon the English public, who want none of 
her. The difference between these two stars is : Miss Stahl 
can act, but has the wrong play for this side of the pond; and 
Fanny Ward can't act and has a worse play. 

On the programme of "The Chorus Lady" Miss Stahl has a 
printed column of interpretations of the language she employs, 
such as. "cinch", "the goods", "beat it", etc. 

Now, when a thing like that was necessary in the very be- 
ginning she should have taken the psychic suggestion and gone 
back to America, and saved her money. 



Marcus Mayer and the Baron. 

Marcus Mayer, of erstwhile fame as stage manager, impresario 
and promoter of business ventures of various success, i- ex- 
pected to arrive in London during the month of July. Credit 
must be given the gay favorite of the aspiring multitude id' 
chorus lailics. for his courage in returning to the seat of war, 
when- four angry women are waiting for him. 

It happened this way: Baron von Horst was interested in 
tin -in -i i -- of the new German tenor. Ludwig Bernhardt, and in 
.In- coarse of arranging Eor the singer's hearing at Covent Gar- 
den by Filotiaid de 1,'eske and Colonel Mapleson, he met Marcus 
.Mayer. The American impresario had a new patent cork which 
he was endeavoring to place on 'be market. The baron gave 
him the American and English law on patents, and also advice 
as to the most expeditious way in which to [dace the new patent 
before the public. 

Shortly after this enlightening conversation, Mayer presented 
the baron with a box at. one of the popular theatres. It was too 
late, however, to ask his friends to share the box with him, so 

the baron entered the theatre in the middle of the first act; alone, 
fully expecting to be the only ornament surrounded by live empty 
chairs. But. the worst was yet to come. 

A silken rustle and strong odor of musk heralded the approach 
of another occupant. It was introduced by the smiling Marcus 
as "Miss So-aiui-So, who is appearing at the Hippodrome." An- 
other rustle, and the beaming Marcus presented "Miss So-and- 
Such, who has just finished an engagement in the Empire 
chorus." 

Just as the gentleman so greatly honored by Marcus was won- 
dering which excuse would sound best in order to get away from 
the theatre, in swept another blondined starletlc. "Mi.-- So- 
and-This. the celebrated lady contortionist/ 9 said the over-joyed 
impresario. "Ach, Colt! will they never stop coming!'" tin- baron 
wondered, as be placed a chair for the lady, who tied herself into 
bow knots and four-in-bands. 

Thrice be attempted to leave the box "for a moment." and 
thrice he was gently but forcibly detained by the three ladies. 

Barons didn't come their way every day — and hadn't Marcus 
whispered to each and every one of them of possibilities? 

dust before the dose of the last act. the Parui] was dimly con- 
scious of a large something entering the box. Cautiously he 
turned, at- the exuberant Marcus, with a wink which was meant 
to convey "What do you think of this?" presented "Miss Truly 
Shattuck, who is appearing in tights at the Albambra." Weakly 
the Baron acknowledged the honor of meeting the lady, as her 
immensity was carefully lowered into a chair. Truly obscured 
the other ladies, to their rage and chagrin — in fact, she didn't 
see them: all she saw was the Baron. 

Marcus Bagely noting that the three ladies of lesser propor- 
tions were getting restless at Truly's monopoly of the Baron. 

3cented trouble, and unceremoniously beat a retreat, leaving four 

women with angelic aspirations to fighl it out alone. 

His last words were: "New, Baron, see that the ladies have 

a nice little supper at Romano's." 

Nerve! Gott in Himmel! Fancy the Baron walking into 
Romano's with Truly a winner, and the other angry three fight- 
ing for a place. It was the last straw. The baron, who bad felt, 
giddy and sea-sick, regained bis courage. No Romano's for him; 
and as for Marcus Mayer — (unprintable!) 

When the four ladies and the baron reached the street, the 
German, with a brave look in his eye. said: "Ladies, shall 1 
have cabs or laxis called for you?" The gushing footlight 
favorites regarded him in surprise. Gradually In- cruel mean- 
ing percolated to their brains: No Romano's 1 . 

London, July I'm' 1 . 



Ladies, when you're shopping and grow hungry, don't you know. 

Swain's Is quite convenient, and 'tis there you ought to go: 
The pastry Is delicious, and the meats and wines are fine — 
Swain's for hungry people Is the place where they should dine! 
Swain's Restaurant. Van Ness avenue, near Sutter. 






July 84, 1900 



and California Advertiser 



19 



(good ijtgtjtuaga ani GUran ^ttnts 



Peenoh Eoads. 



Recently the cable brought the news 
that the French Government had 

been making investigations and 
gathering statistical matter regarding road building in all coun- 
tries, and notably in the United States. It was stated that in 
the United States but 7.14 of the total mileage of roads had been 
improved. This is not intended as an arraignment of America, 
and the intelligence was received in Prance by incredulous 
shrugs. It was unbelievable that so great a nation could so far 
forget itself in not ensuring a greater measure of prosperity to 
posterity. The above percentage means that out of an approxi- 
mate total of 2,150,000 mileage, but 150,000 miles may be said to 
be classed in the good roads category. 

Comment was created all over France, and scholars, students 
of economics, learned editors and professors, began to figure on 
the wastefulness of the American people. It was said that this 
policy of do nothingness was clearly in line with forest denuda- 
tion and with the loss of water rights to the private corporation 
and the gradual loss of the water itself through deforestation. It 
was shown that we are a thriftless, shiftless nation, to whom 
(he Gods had granted a plenitude of all the gifts at their com- 
mand, and that in a largesse of prodigality we are bent on 
spreading to the four winds the blessings so freely given. 

It was said that history's pages proved thai the powers which 
have in turn ruled the world have always led in road building. 

That America fails to appreciate this need. 

That, were American officials as wide awake to the importance 
of highways as the officials of Prance, the gain to the American 
Republic would evened a quarter of a billion dollars annually. 

The figures are not French figures, but were originally given 
to the public at the International Good Roads Congress at Paris 
by Director Logan Waller Page of the Office of Public Roads, of 
the U. S. Agricultural Department. 

Road building in California is only an incident of political 
life activity in all the States, and notably in California, rather 
than a great universal improving and constant function. The 

same applies to streets. San Francisco is an example. Q 

streets are laid, and then are never, or poorly, repaired, and they 
are allowed to get into the most disreputable condition. So it 
is with our roads, with this difference — our country mails are 
in nearly every instance makeshifts. They are cheap in the be- 
ginning and the most expensive luxury the Republic, the Stale 
or the ennui \ has in pay for in I he end. 



In the use oi machine Bweepers for 
Street Cleaning Eeee cleaning the streets, Europe bup- 
anii in Europe. passes American cities. Even 

sprinklers ami sweepers propelled 
by gasoline or electric motors are used in Increasing n 
Especially in Berlin, regarded ae > model city, motor machines 
are used. While this is being done abroad, the streets ol New 
York City are swept for the si pari by hand. "It is interest- 
ing to observe,' 1 says the June Engineering Digest, "that a re- 
cenl commission or investigation in v« York concluded that 
hand sweeping was cheaper than machine sweeping." (few York 
Cm maj be expected to maintain the highest standards in sani- 
tation, but "up to the on sent time there has been l>ut one head 
of the department of Btreet cleaning who has had previous sani- 
tary t raining or experience in directing a large force of men. 
This was Colon I . Waring, who was appointed in 1895, 
.iii.l served for three The organization and methods 

used io-.la\ are practically those introduced by him or investi- 
gating ins.- Iii recent years there has been slight ad- 
vance. 

Paris and Berlin provide examples of well-kept streets. In 
nner city the work is done by a branch of the department 
of public works, which also constructs and maintains streets and 
sidewalks. In Berlin a joint committee of twelve, made up 
from paid and unpaid members of the City Council, is the au- 
thority in charge, under whom is a chief, who has direct 

1871 this • public 

and institutions, practically self-sustaining, 
that the water works and gas works more than pa\ for thi 
ami Hi i considerable income 



toward the payment of their operating expenses." In accord- 
ance with the German idea of municipal administration, "every 
department seems to be run nearly as well as though it was a 
private enterprise." The sewage is pumped from the districts 
where it is collected "long distances into the country, where it 
is used to irrigate farm lands owned by the municipality." It 
is a plan of this city to keep ahead of demand, so that it may 
uot outgrow sanitary requirements. The work of street clean- 
ing is thorough and performed with military precision. 



THE KNOCKER. 



At whatever number the official figures would place the 
population of San Francisco, the fact would still be appar- 
ent that the proportion of undesirable to desirable citi- 
zens could be greatly reduced to the good of the city. Certainly 
every large city has to have a good many whose presence are a 
positive detriment to every social and business interest. But as 
a city, to be a city, must be the home and center of culture and 
of ignorance of virtue and of crime, of wealth and of poverty, 
of commercial activity and of idleness, of the highest type of 
business integrity and of business rascality, of vice in high as 
well as in low places, of splendid as well as of degraded man- 
hood and womanhood; of, in fact, every phase and condition of 
imman existence, it is time foolishly spent and breath wasted 
when efforts are put forth to change the natural order of city 
expansion. In all this multitude of factors which make the 
municipality possible, San Francisco boasts of having a full and 
complete line. San Francisco is not wholly a community of 
either saints or sinners. It is pretty well balanced — honesty, 
culture, and lofty ideals dominating in the general currents of 
going and coming. 

But there is a class of citizens who are the most undesirable 
of all. They are the "knockers." The knocker finds fault with 
the rapid rehabilitation of the city. With him, buildings are be- 
ing constructed far in advance of the demand; they have too 
many stories to make their upper Boors of any worth as renting 
properties; too much money is going into building ornamenta- 
tion; instead of business palaces, there should be plain rough 
walls; street ear service is insufficient, because a lew minutes' 
waiting is often required, or because there are so m;in\ cars ill 
service the streets are crowded to the inconvenience of pedes- 
trians and vehicles; streets are everywhere obstructed bj building 
materials, which make the city look ragged and unkempt; the 
I. "id, 000 commuters who travel to and from the city every day 

i rei towiIs and confusion at the termini of the transportation 

lines, and in all quarters of the city then is something wrong 

But, in fart, he see 5 what legitime activities re- 

quire*- and in these activities there is reflected th< of men 

mill the e mon capital. There may be sin and rice 

inl crookedness in San Francisco, bul th evil is the 

chronic "knocker." 



Harsh Diplomacy. , 

Terrene e O'Grady had been married only a week, hut his bride 
ready making things lively in the little house in Bally- 
bunion. He had been working tor three four- in iii- little - 
when Bridget came to the hack door an. I called out in strident 
tones: "Terrence, me bhoy. come in to tay an 
toast!" Terrenee dropped his spade in BE Dt, and ran 

into the kitchen. "Shure, Bridg only coddin' me!" he 

said. ••Shure. Terrenee. me bhoy," retorted Bridget, "n 
ye Oi'm coddin' at all. at all — it's the naybors!" — Saturday Jour- 
nal. 



Cjfj A T. To Housekeepers 



Please remember when ordering your coal, if jrou want Ihe 
GENUINE CLEAN RICHMOND COAL at wholesale prices 
and full weight, you must order from or through us. We 
deliver in any pari of the city or country in sacks or in bulk. 



J I Mnnrp & Ct\ rs - w PI>E street san francisco 
. J. ITIUUIC Oi KjU. Phono Kf.roy 466 ind Ktirn, 465 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 24, 1909 



ii>an 3Frattrifini $??bs a iHuatral (ftobblpr 



By Harriet Watson Capwell. 



The musical impulse ol a city measures the level upon which 
it stands in the progression from the sordid gathering of gold 
to the appreciation of the lofty arts. Usually it is difficult 
for a stranger to apply the rule, and both the praise and the 
"sneer of the traveled idiot"' are begotten in misapprehension. 
A fortunate combination of circumstances has, however, given 
me an opportunity to baste together some impressions which 1 
feel are not out of focus with fact. 1 have met a number of 
your prominent musicians, and the opera season has furnished 
a background for laying on musical color. As for the opera and 
the tale it tells me, more of that later. 

The ban Francisco Musical Club is vacationing, but from 
the members I have met I am sure such earnest organization 
for knowing the best music must be a potent factor in the musi- 
cal development of the city. If the intelligent musical enthu- 
siasm of women like Mrs. Isador Jacobs, Mrs. Birmingham, Mrs. 
Oscar Mansfek, could be multiplied into thousands, then, in- 
deed, would this city be a musical name to conjure with. Ap- 
parently there are any number of young men and women here 
who give satisfying musical expression to the works of the mas- 
ters. I have heard one young woman violinist, Miss (jrace 
Freeman, and half a dozen pianistes who show splendid breadth 
of talent. But even two or three well-knit musical organiza- 
tions like the San Francisco Musical Club, Treble Clef, and 
half a hundred individuals cannot remove a whole city from the 
blight of commonplace enthusiasm for music. 

I have been to the opera six times in two weeks, and I am 
convinced that the much-vaunted musical enthusiasm of this city- 
requires mending. We had been told that out here we should 
rind the same spontaneous musical enthusiasm that permeates 
the air of Italy and Germany. San Franciscans have insisted 
to me that in no other American city has love of music taken 
squatters' rights and become the common property of all the 
people. Before I went to the opera, I believed this quite prob- 
able, for where in America do so many races come into such 
direct contact with each other, meet and marry and mingle 
heritages of good and bad? In New York, the opera audiences 
know the restraint of wealth and fashion; in Boston music is a 
high-brow affair, where tyros may talk of canons ad hypodia 
pente, pass acaglias on ground basses, strettos, and pedal points. 
But out here I fancied I would rind musical abandon and intelli- 
gent appreciation combined. 

The singers at the Princess Theatre have not the extravagant 
fame that haloes a few choice artists. But many of them I 
have heard abroad at opera houses that are the chief attraction^ 
of the cities whose love of music they commemorate. And yet 
ilii- San Francisco smart set did not go to the opera during 
the six weeks' engagement of this excellent company. 1 heard 
Mrs. Gertrude Atherton comment on the fact, and later read hei 
rebuke, but still I was unprepared for the tepid interest of the 
smart set. After a matinee performance of "Lucia," 1 had i la- 
pleasure of meeting Mrs. Eleanor Martin. "I didn't see a per- 
son in the house that 1 knew," exclaimed her vonng companion. 
Which means that the smart set was distinctly not present. At 
tea at the Fairmont, some one pleaded the season, as an excuse, 
but the apology was not accepted, for by actual count very few 
of the smart set are further away than the suburbs. They 
crowded boats and ears; they honk-honked their automobiles to 
see the "Merry Widow." Their desire to see this musical com- 
edy is a very healthy and exuberant expression of just what 
the rest of the world has been doing. I am not decrying their 
enthusiasm for this fascinating musical frolic, but 1 am con- 
strained to feel that their love of music does not cut deep into 
the most miraculous art in the world — music. 

It is a keen disappointment when one had expected to find here 
a society that had a free, fine, Continental love of music. Mrs. 
William Crocker tells me that the two or three times the Metro- 
politan Company sang here a monumental record was estab- 
lished. But what does that prove? Merely that opera stamped 
by fashion, when it is the "thing to do," can count on society 
here as elsewhere. 

A concert manager told me that he would wager that the bal-~ 



cony, which was usually crowded at the opera, did not at any 
single performance hold one hundred Americans. The French 
and Italian colony poured into it, and the well-to-do French and 
Italians, with the Germans, largely peopled the orchestra. The 
night of the Fall of the Bastile celebration the audience was 
meagre, indeed. An Italian gentleman pointed out to me a 
striking-looking young woman, a Mrs. Pedar Bruguiere. "She 

ee to every performance," he said. "She is one of the grand 

exceptions to the Americans." 

So I have carved a tombstone to the notion that love of music 
is firmer and finer in San Francisco society than elsewhere in 
Am. lira. You are a seaport town, and your foreign population 
can be counted on to give support to good music. But there is 
distinctly lacking that inarticulate mood in the general public, 
that "mood poem," which on the Continent finds its expression 
in music. The other day at the St. Francis a group of people 
were chatting over the pleasant tea cups, and the name of 
Duplessis Beylard was mentioned. Some one told the story of 
his driving a coach between the Palace Hotel and Kurlingame, 
and I thought here is a son of California, a man whose pulse 
only quickens at the stir and tug ■<( a horse, and then Mr. Bey- 
lard himself entered and 1 recognized him as a man whom I 
had seen every time we went to the opera. "But he loves music, 
ten." [ amended out loud, and a young girl, airily disdainful, 
asked: "Does he — how do you know?" If I were a San Francis- 
can and wanted to hide from my society friends, I would tale fco 
the opera. Evidently a man may lead a double life here, be 
devoted to coaching and music, and few will be any the wiser 
about the latter. 




HYOU will buy a piano 
of us, of any make, we 
will agree to exchange 
it for a Steinway at any 
time within three years, 
allowing you on the 
Steinway every dollar 
you have paid upon the 
other instrument. 

You'll ultimately want a 
Steinway, so you better get 
your temporary piano where 
you won't lose anything on it 
when you get ready to trade 
it in for a Steinway. 

Sherman pay & Go. 

STEINWAY AND OTHER PIANOS 

Victor Talking; Machines 

Kearny and Sutter Streets, S. F. 

Clay, at 14th St., Oakland, Cal. 



Spring Styles 

Your inspection is invited to the most 
complete and best assortment of 
Spring and Summer Cloths 

EVER SHOWN IN THIS CITY 



Suits from 
Overcoats from 
Trousers from 



S22.50 up 
S22.50 up 
S 5.50 up 



Chas. Lyons 



771 M»rkel Street 



LONDON TAILOR 

At Our Three Complete Stores 



1432 Fillmore Street 



958 Broadway. Oakland 



July 24, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



21 



THE FORD 

THE WINNER OF WINNERS 




4 cyl. 20 H. P. Welfiht 1200 lbs. 
PRICE INCLUDING MAGNETO, TOP, GAS LAMPS, HORN, GENERATOR, TOOLS, ETC., $1030. 



The GREATEST Car in the WORLD for DURABILITY and ENDUR- 
ANCE. LATEST TRIUMPH, FORD NO. 2 "WINS THE 
NEW YORK TO SEATTLE RACE 



Outclassing 40 to 60 H. P. cars coiling from $ 4000 to $6000. The 
hardest test ever put to an automobile regardless of price and weight. 
Where BIG cars were "stuck" the light Ford kept on. Duplicates of the 
winning Ford ready for immediate delivery. 



Standard Motor Car Company, Agents 

Cor. Van Ness and Golden Gate Avenues, San Francisco 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 24, 1000 




mowmm 



ti^^s^^s^am,: 



\f 



Oh. hark to the call oi' the countryside, 

And come while the sun is a-shining; 
There's bait in the boat and an auto ride, 
And a porch with the roses a-twining. 

I nail, as of old. where the south wind blows; 

So come, wink' the birds are a-trilling — 
Where the hollyhock blooms and tli.' spring ehick grows, 

And where li}>^ are willing — so willing. 

— Chicago Trib » » ". 



The Ford ' 'ar. 

[nterest tills week- ceriters in the Ford No. 2. which arrived on 

Tuesday, and is on exhibition at the sales-rooms of the Stand- 
ard Motor Car Company, at the time this article is written. Un- 
fortunately for many who wish to view the ear. it was announced 
that it would leave here on Thursday lor exhibition purposes in 
Los Angeles. 

Nearly as much interest as was evidenced in the ear itself 
was manifested by the crowds who visited the show rooms to 
see the drivers, B. \V. Scott and 0. J. Smith, who crossed the 
continent in the ear. 

Mr. E. J. Cutting, the manager of the Standard Motor Car 
Company, is to be felicitated on his escape from hurt in an acci- 
dent that happened in the run from Portland to this city. All 
went as merrily as a marriage bell until the car reached a point 
outside id' San Rafael, when the ear was making about fifteen 
miles an hour, having slowed, down to negotiate a hill. As the 
top was reached, the left forward wheel gave way without warn- 
ing. Il was a lucky thing for Mr. Scott, who was with Mr. 
dishing, and for the manager himself, that the ear did not give 
way about ten minutes before, when the ear was running along 
at a racing clip, or they might have been seriously hurt. The 
wheel had evidently been injured in the long transcontinen a] 
ran and was cracked. This car is a wonder, and it shows but 
very slight damage under the gruelling process undergone. 



Tn tin' transcontinental race, the Ford left New York on June 
1st. Tin' conditions of this trip were exceedingly hard, as the 
lime In make certain points was limited, and the running time 
of tin' ears had to he adjusted 80 as lo run at top speed outsidfl 
of town limits, anil slnw speed in the villages and towns, and 
the reads were nowhere imni- ton good. The schedule had to be 
made, and this entailed a va.-l amount of hardship not only on 

i lie .jr. hui especially on the drivers. The drivers tell a tale of 

the rush al tin- second part of the I rip when the race became a 

free-for-all for the goal. They say they rested where oighl over- 
took them, and that they ran along as long as their stamina held 

nut. They saw a bed, or the inside of one, twiet this trip. 

Their hesl day was fast sleam-hip lime. 317 miles in seventeen 
hours. The consensus of opinion among those who won is that 
it was really an endurance contest of light ears againsl heavy, 
and that the light car- won. This, thej say, was proven wf 
a light ear. the Ford especially, plunged into a mud hole. In- 
variably the little giant pulled itself oul of the predicament in 
record time under its own power, and the heavier car. meeting 
with the same mishap, would have to wait the assistance of 
dors -. sometimes consuming hours of time in waiting alone. Al- 
together the New York-Seattle race was a brilliant victory for 
the Pord No. 2 car. 



The California to Seattle Route. 

Every owner of a ear. who is at all ambitious, is making the 
trip from Los Angeles and the interior California points, and 
San Francisco in Seattle, under his own power. Cars arc strung 
along, chugging away over hill and dale, to the A. Y. P. Expo- 
sition, all along the roads from Baja California to the shores of 



T A X I C A B S 

(Genuine RENAULT Cars) 
PACIFIC TAXIMETER CAB COMPANY 

Solicits your patronage of its equipment of imported 
Renault Taxicabs and will show its appreciation by 
prompt and reliable service. * * * * 

TELEPHONE 

FRANKLIN 4848 

Private Exchange connecting atl Departments 

MAIN STATION AND GENERAL OFFICES, 1355-63 BUSH STREET 

FAY C. BEAL. General Manager. 



Puget Sound. There are little lens. FJjips, Westcotts, up to big 
Renaults, Thomases and Packard-. Locomobiles, Oldsmobiles, 

Maxwells and every other imaginable make under the sun. The 
1'iiiick. the Stearns, the Ford and eyi'vy manufactory is repre- 
sented, all chugging away nn the up-trip. On the down-trip, 
some of the less hardy fall oui ol the procession and the cur- 
are shipped clown by rail. Il - a hard grind, and few care In 
come the long distance back in their own cars, but prefer to 
patronize the railroad company. Croat is the automobile ! Il is 

the car of civilization, and if our roads were only equal In ' 

machinery, this would he the greatest Inuring section in the 

world. Machinery, however, give, oui nn poor mads, and heart- 
breaking delays are the consequence. One of those returning 
from the really great show in Seattle says he bad the time of 
his life, ami that his car did not meet with any serious mishaps, 
but that many others did, and that, in nearly every instance, the 
cause was bad roads. Some day the public will awaken to the 
fad that a poor road is (lie very worsl investment for a city or 
county to make. Great complaint is made that the roads arc 
in much worse condition when under the jurisdiction of villages 
I han when under the management of county authorities. We 



^SN^BC* 



Lowers the Record 

Between Los Angeles 

and San Francisco 

2 hours 56 minutes 30 seconds 

486 miles in 16 hours 46 minutes 30 seconds 

One ol the most difficult road tests of ^i» led. power, endur- 
ance and reliability, is ;i speed trial bet ween San Frani 1st o 
and Los Angeles. On account <>f" tiit - * difference in the mountain 
grades, and more particularly nn account of the head winds 
which are encountered going north, the trip from Los Angeles to 
Ran Francisco is much more difficult. 

The White record of nineteen hours and forty-three minutes has 
stood for two years. 

A RAMBLER, Model Forty- five four cylinder, close-coupled touring 
car, driven by L. R. Harvey, accompanied by three passengers on 
July 17th, lowered the existing record 2 hours 56 minutes 30 seconds. 
The best performance ever made over these roads. 
The RAMBLER still holds the rcord for the round trip between Los 

AnpHf-s and San Diego. It won the Cfmnslor & Lyon trophy for that 

run In December of last year, and repeated attempts of other cars 

of higher power and price have resulted in failure. 

331 miles in 10 hours 32 minutes, which is the best road record 

ever made In America by an automobile over roads not especially 

prepared and patrolled, 

Inspecl the car as it finished this wonderful performance, and 

also examine our polished Chassis, which shows in ilctnil every 

part of the best car made in the largest factory In the world- 

Thomas B. Jeffery & Company 

117-125 Valencia St., San Francisco 
Factory — Kenosha, Wis. 



July 34, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



23 



know Unit this is true in California, and it is to be marveled at, 
as the villages are greatly benefited by the automobile owners 
financially. 

The Motor Hunt. 
Tlu' map mill the details oi the big motor bunt In take place 

on the last Saturday in August, the 39th, published last week 
ill the News Letter, lias awakened an added interest, in the event. 
The fact that it is not a race, but an occasion for the exhibition 
nt skill and lor bringing out all the resourcefulness and in- 
genuity there is in the driver or owner of a car, and that there 
is no danger, that whole families may and probably will partake 
in the search for quarry car and control is very attractive to all. 
'l'b is week it was hoped to publish the maps of the "sanctuary 
territory." at or near San Jose and at San Mateo, in detail, but 
the maps were not ready, and this is deferred until next week. 
Between now and next publication, day cards will be left at the 
various garages to be given to all who desire information on the 
motor hunt. The work of selecting controls is going on, and 
when the start is made on the 29th, the contestants in this novel 
sport will be sure of a keen competition, if the talk now going on 
is anything to gauge the interest and popularity of the hunt. The 
number of those participating is not limited in number. Take 
your family out for the short run to San Jose and back, enjoy 
yourself along the road, and find the controls and the "quarry 
car," and carry off the prize, but, if you believe that you are go- 
ing to have an easy job of it, the automobile editor wishes to 
give you a quiet lip that there are others who drive, and who 
are your competitors. The Motor Hunt is the big new sport, 
and it has been enthusiastically received all over the East. As 
announced in previous issues of the News Letter, the various 
clubs and associations who engage in tnotoring have signified 
thai no event of any importance will interfere with your pleasure 
or the use of the roads for Motor Hunt day, so get in line for 
a day of pure fun, and carry off one or both of the prizes. 

* * * 

The longest automobile race track in the Wist is to !><■ con- 
structed just north of Cheyenne, Wyoming, under tin 1 direction 
of the frontier committee and Cheyenne. The course will bo live 
miles in length, pear shaped, practically level throughout, and 
all on city ground. The starling and finishing point will be 
directly in front of the grandstand ai Frontier Park, The en- 
tire course will be in plain view of the grandstand. The trad 
will be completed before the Frontier day celebration in August. 
The lirst race meet will he held during Hie celebration. Funds 
for grading and bunking the track have been arranged for. So 
excellent will be the roadway that it is expected tibat the race 

meets will attract motorists from .ill sections of the country. 

* * * 

What is perhaps the longest end straightesl auto line in Texas 
is the one jusl opened from Hereford to Big Springs, a distance 

ol' ■.'■.'."> miles. A part) "' sixteen made the initial trip, coming 

from r.ig Springs, Brownfield and other points along the route. 
The route has been opened the entire distance. While the 

wagon roads lime been followed in a few places, most of the 

line strikes straighl across the big pastures, passing over or 
through the fence bj means of "cattle guard pits." \ number 
of machines will be operated. Relief and supply stations will 
be established along (be line. It takes about twenty hour- to 

make the trip. 

* * * 

The new automobile police patrol wagon has been installed in 

the city of Denver. The chassis is ol the S oddard-Dayton make 

and the motor develops 45 horsepower. The horse-drawn patrol 

Wagons will be held in resi barns until outs 

stations are established, at which time they will be placed in 

service at these phi 

» « * 

Motor bus service is to be suppl'ed between Evergreen. Idaho, 
the present terminus of the Pacific v v Idaho Northern Railway, 
to 'Meadows, Payette Lake. Roeeberry and Van Wyok in Long 
Valley. Four machines will be used on the route, one carrying 

'.' I passengers. 

* • * 

reported that a motor wa^ai service will be established 
between Los Angeles and Wilmington. Cal. 

» * * 

The trustees of Los Cal., have rati pur- 

of a motor-ib" 



«a£& 




JONES 

Speedometer 



The JONES is THE speedometer which made the speedometer 
business. 

It's the Pioneer with 10 years of "Knowing how" to back it. 

UNFAILING RELIABILITY is the rock upon which the 
JONES reputation Stands. 

ABSOLUTE ACCURACY— "Accurate to a whisper," is respon- 
sible for its preference by ALL motorists who want to KNOW 
how fait and how far they are travelling. 

When you consider the nicety and care with which the JONES 
is constructed — when you realize the proven excellence of its 
principle — you then know why there are FOUR Jones Speed- 
ometers in actual use, to ONE of any other make. 

"Put a JONES on your dash and look the TRUTH in the (ace!" 

JONES SPEEDOMETER DEPT. United Manufacturers Inc. 

Broadway & 76th St.. NEW YORK 
Chanslor & Lyon Motor Supply Co. Los Angeles San Francisco 



1910 




^-Ready for Delivery Sept. 1st 
It will pay you to see this 50 Horse 
Power, 4 cylinder car, capable of 
70 miles per hour speed. Many 
improvements in refined construc- 
tion make our 1910 Model the acme 
of perfection. 

Speedwell Motor Car Co. of California 



Phone Market 6951 



489 Golden Gate Avenue 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 24, 1909 



Beautiful 

Paraiso Hot Springs 

The Mecca for AutomobiMs 



New Auto Boulevard from Soledad 
to the Springs. Roads in first-class 
condition from Oakland to Paraiso. 
Special Rates; care and attention 
paid to motor parties. New Garage. 
Supplies, gasolene, oils and repairs 
at city prices. 



Most wonderful natural hot mineral 
waters and baths on the Coast. The 
only HOT SODA baths in California 
positively guaranteed to cure rheu- 
matism, gout, malaria, liver, kidney 
and stomach troubles. 



Mineral waters awarded first prize 
at St. Louis Exposition. Climate 
unexcelled. Rates $12.00 to $16.00. 
baths included. 



Train leaves 3rd and Townsend at 
8 a. m. connecting with AUTOMO- 
BILE at Soledad, arriving at Springs 
for lunch. 



Booklets at Peck's, 789 Market St.; Bryan's, 2004 Sutter St., 
San Francisco.or H.H. McGowan, Paraiso, Monterey Co.,Cal. 



PIONE ER 

Automobile Co. 



Booking orders for early delivery 
on 1910 Model Hudson Runabouts, 
Chalmers-Detroit 30's and 40's and 
all types of Thomas Flyers. Sample 
Cars will be on exhibition at our 
salesrooms within three weeks 
from date. 



901 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, S. F. 

188 12th St, Oakland 1222 I St., Fresno 



All records for trans-continental touring in automobiles by 
women were broken early last week- by Mrs. Josh H. Ramsey of 
Hackensaek, N. J., when she drove her model D Maxwell tour- 
ing car into Columbus. Nebraska. Never has any woman driven 
a car across the continent from New York as far as she had when 
she reached that city, and it is doubtful if any one litis ever 

driven a ear over such terrible roads as far on the A rican 

continent as has Mrs. Ramsey, who, by the way, is accompanied 
by three other ladies, Mrs. N. R. Powell, Mrs. M. Atwood and 
Miss H. Jahns, on the first trans-continental tour of the kind 
ever attempted. 

Under ordinary conditions, the tour would not be difficult, 
but the terrific rains and cloudbursts through the West this sum- 
mer have put the roads in a condition the like of which is not 
remembered by even the oldest inhabitant, and the wonder of it 
all is that any car could stand the strain that Mrs. Ramsey^s 
heavily laden Maxwell has without giving away somewhere, but 
stand it it did. to the amazement of vast crowds of natives who 
gathered along the roads at the deep mud holes, and cheered 
as the fair driver pushed her Maxwell through holes ami 

stretches that had stopped, other tourists, while the natives ap- 
plauded the plucky quartette antl the powerful ear. 

At Cheyenne a brief rest was taken, after which the Maxwell 
ivas again headed due west for the run and steady climb through 
Laramie, and Rawlins to (J ranger, Wyoming. From here tin' 
trip this week will be through Sal; Lake City, Reno. Sacra- 
mento to San Francisco, across the high ranges of the Rockj 
Mountains, up and down steep grades, which by the way have 
no terrors for Mrs. Ramsey or any of her party, for the car has 
already been through work that would pull it to pieces, if hard 
work could possibly do it. She has had not a bit of engine or 
mechanical trouble of any kind and surprisingly few tire trou- 
bles. In fact, the car seems to have suffered not in the least, 
and the engine is working, in fact, better to-day than when the 
party left New York. For these reasons, Mrs. Ramsey is con- 
fident that the bold grades of the rough Rockies will be easily 
negotiated, and that in a short while she will have reached San 
Francisco, claiming the honor of being the first lady to drive a 
car from New York to San Francisco, or Hell Gate to the Golden 
Gate, for herself, and for her car the glory that goes with having 
crossed the American continent under conditions more trying 
titan any ever encountered by any other ear. 



Julian Street, the writer, in his "Modern Mercuries," a story 
of racing drivers, tells this typical incident of George Robertson, 
the winner of the Yandcrliilt Cup. who is now under contract 
with the Harry S. Houpt Co.. to drive Houpt and Herreshoff 
cars. Big. solid, sunny George Robertson, who looks as though 
nothing could move him. is nevertheless a very high strung 
driver. In a race I have seen him acting like a raving maniac. 
He has been known to strike the men in the supply pits when 
they did not show speed enough to suit him. He is absolutely 
intrepid, and gives one the idea that he is forcing his car to 
the utmost all the time, which is pretty nearly true. Some time 
after the Briarcliff race a friend told me that Robertson had 
hurled a monkey-wrench at another driver, who deliberately 
tried to block him. The next time I saw him I spoke of this 
story. Robertson seemed incensed at such a libelous tale. He 
denied it vehemently. 

"What? Me? Me throw a monkey-wrench at any one? Well. 
1 guess not. Do you think I'm crazy?' 3 

"Xo, no, George." I s;iid. pacifically, "I only asked." 

"Why." he continued. "1 might need my monkey-wrench 
more than any other tool. Throw it away? Xot me." 

He stepped over to his car and picked up a handful of nuts 
and bolts. "See these? That's what we throw. They do just 
as good as a wrench, and we can spare "em." 



The Wilson and Proctor Realty Company, of (it-over. Colo- 
rado, uses an automobile in their land selling business. Post- 
master G. W. Parke is a motorist. The Colorado Immigration 
Company and the Federal Land Company are other concerns 
which lind the motor car convenient and necessary in their 
business. 

* * * 

The success of the motor 'bus service between Palo Verde and 
Los Angeles, Cal., has been so pronounced that the proprietors 
have decided to double the equipment. 



.IYi.y 84, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



25 



The following motor car parties came. into Del Monte last 
week: T. I. Bergin, Miss Mihan, W. J. Mihan, J. A. Mihan and 
chauffeur in a Peerless. Mr. and Mrs. W. ('. Baker of Provi- 
dence, 1!. I., and chauffeur, in a Packard from Pasadena who 
were joined on the 13th by B. 0. Baker and A. A. Dodworth in 
a Buick. Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Stratton and Miss Dorothy 
Stratton, of Erie, Pa., with E. C. Smith and Mrs. C. S. Smith 
of Pacific Grove, in a Chalmers-Detroit. Mr. and Mrs. B. M. 
\\, u kins of Pasadena in a Buick. Mrs. J. H. Pryor and Miss A 
M. Pryor of San Francisco, with Miss Curtis of Berkeley and 
chauffeur in a six-cylinder Franklin. Mr. and Mrs. E. Ames, of 
San Francisco, in a Haines. Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Wilson and 
chauffeur. Mr. and Mrs. I. \V. Hellman, Jr.. Warren Hellman, 
Frederick Hellman, and chauffeur, of San Francisco, in a 
Matheson. Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Glazier and chauffeur of 
New York in a Locomobile. H. T. Wicl, C. G. Tripler and H. 
M. Landsberger, of San Francisco in a Buick. 

The Winters' Automobile Club drove to Pacific Grove on 
Thursday evening of last week, in nine lieo cars, after a run 
without accident or necessary delay along the road, through 
Marin County to San Francisco, San Jose, through Santa Cruz 
hills to Surf City, and around the bay onto Monterey Peninsula. 
Registering at Pacific Grove, they took the Seventeen Mile Drive 
Friday morning, and left on the home run, to be made by way 
of San Juan, Napa, St. Helena, over Montecello road from 
Napa, through Lake County to Winter's Friday afternoon. 

* * * 

The Pioneer Automobile Company reports the following sales 
within the last week: T. C. Van Ness, San Francisco, purchased 
a Chalmers-Detroit "40;" L. H. Wagner, of Oakland, an Olds- 
mobile; A. D. Milson, Visalia, Oldsmobile; P. \V r . Swanton, of 
Santa Cruz, Thomas Flyer; C. F. Tuman, Oakland, Thomas 
Flyer; T. R. Mott, San Francisco, Chalmers-Detroit "30;" F. 
M. Logan, Oakland, a Chalmers-Detroit "30." 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Baker, of Providence. R. I., and Pasa- 
dena, with a party of friends toured in a seven-seated Packard 
car to Rancho del Monte last Sunday, the 18th, and enjoyed 
luncheon there. 

* * * 

The Florida Locomobile racing car is here on exhibition. This 
is I lie big car that won the Vanderbilt contest. It can be seen 
at the agency at 22(5 "Van Ness avenue. 

* * * 

Dr, Herbert C. Moffitt, of San Francisco, arrived al Del Monte 
on (he 1 7th. 



The car driven from San Francisco to Seattle by Doctor Cha 
R. Ford was, we are informed, not a Thomas, but a Packard. 




Whatever model Speedwell you buy— Roadster, Touring 
Car or Baby Tonneau, you get the same marvelous 
40-45 H. P. engine on a car that is perfedt in every de- 
tail— "the bes\ that can be built"— completely equipped, 
except top, at $2650. 

Speedwell Motor Car Company 



of California 



Phone Market 6951 



489 Golden Gate Avenue 



Having relinquished the agency for 

STEARNS MOTOR CARS 

we offer balance of stock on hand at 

20% discount 

from factory list price. 

Reliance Automobile Co. 

342-352 Van Ness Ave. 











Moore 
Motor 




r 


1 


^NAZZARO 

|U5ES MONOGRAM OIL 






V 


1 


' .- HLd 


lihr 


Supply 




1 


V 

.J 1 


V 'i' i*« 


rlii ii . 


Company 

Distributors for 

Monogram Oil 


iiww 


III 


nWu 


-.*:i£**3ibJ ii'M 




. 


w 






VAN NESS AND GOLDEN 
GATE AVKNIES. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

OAKLAND 


. 














1 


LOS ANGELES 








6 VAN 


IZERACE 

YAH. NOV. 26™I908 













ze 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 24, 1909 



FOR SALE 



Thomas "40" Roadster 

as below. Fully equipped 




IVAN L. De JONGH 446 fulto_n_stbeet. 



PHONE PARK 354 



The Peer of All! 

DEMAND 

PLANET AU T L f ILE 

TAKE NO SUBSTITUTE 

Bass-Hueter Co. 

816 Mission Street Distributors 

Adapted to Every Machine 

"Frirftion Costs More Than Lubrication" 



ARRIVED 

iwo] The Autocar \j™[ 



4 cyl. 30 H. P. Type XX Light Touring 
Car, $1900, f. o. b. San Francisco 

Bosch Double Ignition System. Come in and see the 
first of the new season's models. 

Walter C. Morris, 

Tel. Franklin 3777. 640 VAN NESS AVE- 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF REPAIRING AUTO 
LAMPS, RADIATORS AND FENDERS AT SHORT 
NOTICE. Phone Market 751 




METAL SPINNING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 



Nighi Work at Splitdorf Factory. 

Producing two hundred magnetos every day, over one thou- 
sand spark plugs, and two hundred coils, the factory of C. F. 
Splitdorf, in upper New York City, is now in the midst of one 
of the busiest seasons in its history. Working day and night, 
closing on Sundays only, it has become the effort of the manage- 
ment so to arrange manufacturing operations as to till as mueh 
as possible the orders which are received from automobile fac- 
tories and retailers all over the country. Having been estab- 
lished since 1858, the Splitdorf laboratory is the oldest in the 
business of making electrical ignition apparatus, and in its 
comparatively new structure, with its large output, is one of the 
largest. Six floors and a basement are utilized, and it has been 
found necessary to make additions on the vacant ground adjoin- 
ing in order to produce sufficient material to meet the demand. 
The area of the structure is large in itself, so that there is room 
for 600 employees, with the various departments located to 
economize in space. 

Over 150 machine tools are in operation throughout the build- 
ing; lathes, drill presses and special machines being run at a 
maximum compatible with producing goods of high quality. 
Everything that goes into the making of the apparatus is manu- 
factured by the Splitdorf Company. The steel for the magnets 
is treated, formed and magnetized; the armatures are wound; 
the magneto parts are machined from the castings: gears are 
cut; mils entirely formed and packed; and, in fact, every pro- 






REO 

AND 


*t 


0&bar&-!agt0n 




J. W. LEAVITT & CO. 


Golden 


Gate Ave., cor. Hyde St. Phone Market 411 



The Splitdorf Magneto. 

cess can be seen from the receipt of the supplying materials to 
the shipping of the finished product. 

Besides having branches in Chicago, San Francisco, Boston 
ami Detroit, agencies have been established in the leading foreign 
cities, the better to care for the constantly increasing European 
demand for Splitdorf goods. These are as follows: Paris, 88 
Avenue des Ternes; London, 139 Long Acre; Barcelona, Spain, 
433 Consejo de Ciente; Brussels, Belgium, 33 Square Glutten- 
berg; Turin, Italy, 64 Via Santa Chiara. 



The remarkable and continued success of Michelin tires in 
every form of road and track contest has been emphasized again 
by a large number of victories within the last thirty days. The 
list includes first and third places in the 390 mile Denver Motor 
I Hub stock ear road race on July 5th ; the 100 mile track record 
at Columbus, Ohio, on July 3d: the kilometer, the mile and the 
free-for-all at the annual meet at Wildwood, X. J., also on July 
5th, and the 25 mile Canadian' Championship at Montreal, July 
9th. At the Illinois State Fair meet, duly 10th, Michelin tires 
won the 5 mile and the 50 mile contests. 

* * * 

According to an official of the Michelin Company, tires re- 
ceive much harder durability tests in high speed road and track 
contests than in ordinary use on pleasure cars. He points oul 

that to win. drivers must force every ounce of energy OUl Ol their 
engines, and are obliged to skid around corners at high speed, 
and at times when danger presents itself, must jamb their 
brakes hard \\ Lthoul a thought of tires or anything else excepting 

to overcome all obstacles and to finish in the lead. 



.Iri.v 24, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



37 



jma&k 



Satisfaction 



One hundred and sixty-two Mitchell 
automobiles carrying five hundred and 
fourteen satisfied owners assembled at 
San Jose, July 10th and 11th. 

"Show Me" a parallel assemblage. 

Osen & Hunter Auto Co. 



San Francisco 



HOMES 
San Jose 



Oakland 



BUICK 



Continues Triumphal March 



Columbus, Ohio, July 2nd and 3rd 
Stock Car Events 



Buicks entered seven events. 

Won both 1st and 2nd in all seven events. 

Won 1st, 2nd and third in lOO miles American 
Championship, lowering its own, the world's record 
for cars regardless of price, for every mile from 50 
to 10O, and defeating among others, Barney Oldfleld 
in his six-cylinder National, (Savanah Grand Prize 
car.) and Chalmers-40. 

Duplicates of these speedy cars, 

"WHITE STREAK" $1150. lob. San Francisco 
BUICK-40. $1900. f. o. b. San Francisco. 

Think It Over 
HOWARD AUTOMOBILE CO. 

523-533 Golden Gate Avenue 
Telephone Market 1536 San Francisco 




G & J TIRE CO., 414-416 Van Ness Ave. 

Telephone Market 1095 



AUTO LIVERY 
COMPANY 

Agents for the famous 

APPERS0N CARS 



Salesrooms and Garage: N.W. corner 
Van Ness and Golden Gate Avenues. 
The finest livery service in the West. 

Ring up FRANKLIN 1535 

Bargains in second hand cars of various makes 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 24, 1909 



Representative Garages of San Francisco. 

Washington and East Streets Phone Kearny 678 

Ferry Garage Company 

All Workmanship Guaranteed 



Storage Renting 1 



Supplies Machinist 



Station in the World.' 



MOTOR CAR SERVICE CO. 

J. W. PEARSON. General Manager 
Market and Van Ness 



Phone Market 1 70S 



Auto Livery Co. 



M. L. Rosenfeld, Mgr. 
Van Ness and Golden Gate. Phone Franklin 1535 



The Renstrom Garage 



424 to 446 Stanyan Street. 



Tel. Park 476 



Golden Gate School of 
Automobile Engineering 

419-425 Larkio Street 
Phone Franklin 3391 


A. GILCREST 


Automobile 
Clearing House 

San Francisco. Cal 



^goS^k^ 



Thomaa B. Jeffery 


& Company, 


117-126 Valencia 


St., San Francisco 








ASK 


ABOUT 










A 


J 


A 


X 


T 


I 


R. 


£ 










INSURANCE 










AJAX-GRIEB RUBBER 

N. £a£ Corner 57th Street and Broadway, New York. 

Branches in all large cities 


C O M P A N 

Factories. Trenton. N. J. 


Y 



CAL. 



AUTO TOP 



CO. 



SEAT COVERS, DUST HOODS, ETC. 
309 GOLDEN GATE AVE. E. H. MORGAN. Mgr. 



Your Wisest Move 




will be to equip your car with 


a 


Splitdorf Mag 


neto 


the Magneto that gave such perfect ignition i 
severest test ever known — the recent 10,000 mile 
of the Maxwell car. 

Ask for Magneto catalog. 


ill through the 
Non-Stop Run 


C. F. SPLITDORF 

Pacific Coast Branch 
520 Van Ness Ave. 


San Francisco 



OIL IS CHEAPER THAN FRICTION' 




EASTERN f\ I I 

AUTOMOBILE U I L 

EFFICIENT NON-CARBONIZING ECONOMICAL 



Ask your garage. California Compounding Company, San 
■luxe. Pacific Coast Distributors. 



The Thomas Flyer iSTo. 76 in the Glidden Tour, which is being 
used as the Press Car by the publishers of ''Automobile" and 
"Motor Age." is attracting a great deal of attention. This is all 
owing to the fact that the famous George Schuster, who drove the 
Thomas Flyer in its successful race around the world, winning 
by the wide margin of twenty-six days, is the driver. 

Mr. Schuster, at the start of the tour, attracted more attention 
than all other ears put together. He is so well known and has so 
many friends along the road that his progress is a constant ova- 
tion. Schuster's pleasant, though gruff, greeting is extended 
to everybody, whether he knows them or not. He is always ready 
with an instant quip or jest, and a reminiscence of his famous 
race around the world. He is the same as ever. His glorious 
success has not inflated or enlarged his bump of self-esteem; if 
anything, he is more modest and retiring than in the old days 
before he became famous. 

The Lane steamer demonstrator has arrived at the agency in 
Oakland. This car is made by the Lane Motor Vehicle Com- 
pany of Poughkeepsie, N. Y. The car as shown in Oakland. 
which may use gasoline or distillates as fuel. It is markedly 
different in its salient features than any of the other steamers 
on the market. It is not so high on the body; it is better bal- 
anced as to weight, and is not _ top heavy, and the engine is 
located under the forward part of the ear, thus equalizing the 
load. The Lane has been reduced in price, and the new quota- 
tions should attract purchasers. The one big argument against 
the steam car is cost of up-keep, but the Lane is so built that its 
up-keep is much less than that of any other steamer. Besides, 
in making repairs, it is a delight to the owner to find that all 
gears and threads are LT. S. Standard) and not that of some 
special factory. 

* * * 

The Coast Carriage Company is going out of the carriage 
business, and the modern vehicle has replaced the old style. 
"This is the day they give carriages away" every time you buy 
a whip. They all have to come to it, and Messrs. Darrow, Bart- 
lett and Eachus have succumbed. The change is now being 
made, and the Westcott automobile is king in the carriage re- 
pository. As soon as the horse-drawn vehicles are disposed of 
they will be replaced by automobiles. The garage and show 
room is the very finest on either side of the bay. 

The firm has secured the Westcott as a moderate-priced 
machine, and they are showing a capacity with their demonstra- 
tor that has seldom been equaled by many of the larger machines. 
This week two of the cars were sold to Woodland parties, Mr. 
.1. A. Murray and Mr. Armstrong, of Murray & Armstrong. A 
carload of the machines is on the way. 

* * * 

F. W. Swanton well-known to all residents and visitors at 
Santa Cruz, made a hurried trip to this city during the early 
part of the week, and purchased a large Thomas car. Mr. Swan- 
ton has long been an enthusiastic motorist, having owned several 
cars. This is bis first Thomas, however, and in order to make 
certain he would have no difficulty in handling the car, Charles 
O'Day accompanied him to Santa Cruz. They started out the 
next morning alter purchasing the machine, anil made the run 
in good time. Mr. Swanton will use the ear in his business, 
which necessitates long trips, as well as constant riding about 

bis home city. 

* * * 

Aiming those who are taking advantage of the pleasant 
weather and the comfort of traveling in an automobile, for a 
vacation tour of the northern part of the Stale, are (ieorge K. 
Tunnan. of Fruitvale, and the other members of his family. 
'I lie party left last Thursday in their new sixty horse-power 
Thomas for Shasta, and expect to spend about two weeks in that 
delightful spot. On their return, after about a week's rest, it is 
the intention to make the run to Los Angeles. Mr. Tinman has 
extensive lumber interests, and will use his car all through thi 
winter, going back and forth between the different claims owned 
by him. 

* * » 

The W. \j. Loos & Co. Agency, Oakland, has just sold a Stude- 
l.akcr E. M. F. to Mr. C. F. Smith, anil R. J. I'avert made 
the purchase of a.Eeo touring car. Mr. I'avert was so enthusi- 
astic over Ins Reo that he started for Portland and Seattle with 
it the day alter obtaining possession. He will go and return in 
his car. 



July 21, 1909 



and California Advertiser 




The Octopus Turns. 

The enraged financial magnate was charging madly through 
the office of the 10 cent monthly magazine. "What is he doing?" 
asked the amazed by-standers; "running amuck?" "I think 
not," said one of the frightened stenographers, preparing to flee. 
"He's running a muckraker." — Chicago Tribune. 

Wasted Endeavor. 

"Well, Uncle Zeb," said his neighbor, "your boy's come back 
from college, and 1 reckon he's got a good ejjication." "No," 
groaned Uncle Zeb. "Them four years is plumb wasted. I 
tried 'im on a railroad guide the other day, an' he couldn't make 
head ner tail of it, any more'n the rest of us could!" — Chicago 
Tribune. 



Turned to Account. 

"I suppose you did not sec the lovely sunrise this morn- 
ing?" said Mr. Earlybird to Mr. Nightowl. "Of course not," 
was the latter's reply, in a rebuking tunc. "1 was abed long be-, 
fore that. You should cultivate better hours, sir." — Saturday 
Journal. 



Poor Man. 

"Yes," he said sadly, and there was a tear in his eye. "Yes, 
in V business has driven mc to Hie wall." And lie wenl nn posting 

bis liills. 



The I 'Itimate Consumer. 

"What made Milwaukee famous?" 

"Wrong again." "What, then?" "Thi 



"The beer, of 
men behind it." 



course, 



Not .1 rUsHc. 

Esmeralda — Geoffrey is sued a liar. Gwendolen — 1 wouldn't 
mind dial, if he could lie convincingly. Chicago Tribune. 



Dinah, crying bitterly, was coming down the streel witli 

her feel bandaged. "Why, what on lie matter?" she 

was asked. "Ilnw did you hurl your Eeet, Dinah?" "Da 

IV nolliin' nigger (sniffle) don, on de liaid wif a club 

while I was standin' on de hard stniie pavemi ni." — Everybody's. 



The Insurance agent — Sure, j hearl isn'1 weak. The 

Insured One— Oh, yes, yes. The Agent -Ever test it? The 
Insured One ■* os, indeed. T watched a fifteen inning hall game 
with the score I to 1. - Cleveland Plain Ti 



"How do you recognise an infant industry?" 

tnosi infants," answered Senator Sorghum, "il 

the amount of noise il makes when it waul- to be DOti 
Washington Sta 



"This play, in it- intensity," said the go-ou - 

hi- young man. "fairtj takes mv breath away." "I only wish 
ii would," remarked the lady in the nexl seat.— Ti - 



Mr. Popp — Hurray ! for once in my life 1 know when' 

my cuff links arc. Mr-. Popp- Where are the} BOW? Mr. 

Popp n e baby's swallowed '.an. CTi '■ 

Marie — Hut if you love Tom. why do you go about with 
Madge — Well, you see, Tom is rather slow and I'm using 
•lack as a pace-maker for fa ipt. 



Never anyone, anywhere will make 
a better one" 



Durocar 

Durocar Automobile Company 



Tips to Automobilists 

SAN FRANCISCO— Osen & Hunter Auto Co.. 511 Golden Gate avenue 
Tel Market 2723. The San Francisco home of the "Mitchell Family." 

SAN FRANCISCO— Reed Electric Laboratories. 370 Golden Gate avenue. 
Tel. Franklin 4534. Electric repairing and sundries. Reed's electric 
lights for automobiles. Batteries repaired and recharged. 

14-MILE HOUSE— "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Automobile Supplies and re- 
pair shop. First class accommodations. Cuisine unsurpassed on the 
Coast. "Andy," formerly of the "Cliff House." 

OAKLAND— Osen & Hunter Auto Co., 1224 "Webster street. Tel. Oah 
4076. The Oakland home of the "Mitchell Family." 

MAYFIELD — Reed Electric Works, on the road. Telephone Palo Alto 
593 R-I. Electric repairing and sundries. Batteries recharged. Gasoline 
and oils. Reed's electric lights for autos. 

SAN JOSE — Holsberg Bros., 246 W. Santa Clara (opposite Notre Dame 
Convent), upon entering town via S. F. road. Gasoline, oils, sundries and 
repairs. Seven passenger Thomas for hire. 

SAN JOSE — Osen & Hunter Auto Co.. 1st and St. James Sts. Tel. 
Main 38. The San Jose home of the "Mitchell Family." 

SAN JOSE— WALLACE BROS." GARAGE. Market and St. James 

streets. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 

ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 

service. Rambler and Regal agencies. 

SAN JOSE— San Jose Garage, 400 North First street, Blomdahi & 
Keller, Mgre. Renting, repairing and sundries. Agents for Goodyear 
tires. Phone Main 121. W. F. Hunt, agent for Chalmers-Detroit, 
Thomas, Buick and Olds. Phone Main 493. 

SAN JOSE.— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlor for ladies in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE— Lamolle Grill. 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

LOS GATOS. — Gem CM Telephone Red 821. Auto supplies 

and repairing. Full stock of Morgan A Wright tires. Open day and 
night. 

GILROT. CAL. — George E. TIce, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service, 260 N. Mon- 
terey street. 

WATSONVTLLE. — J. H. Covell Garage. Expert machine work, auto 
supplies, batteries recharged, gas engines repaired. Autos for hire day or 
night. Corner Main street and Lick avenue. 

SANTA CRUZ. — Pacific Garage. Hunt & Grisingher. proprietors. Auto 
repairing and supplies. Cars for hire. Phone Main 222. 353-355 Pacific 
avenue. Santa Cruz. 

SAN JUAN. — Plaza Hotel — Headquarters for automobiles and tourists 
(special attention.) Opposite the old San Juan Bautista Mission, founded 
1797. Main road to Hotel Del Monte. A. H. BALDWIN. Prop. 

SANTA ROSA.— Occidental Hotel. Bane Bros., props. 4th and B Sts. 
European plan. $1.00 per day and up. American plan $2.50 per day and 
up. The most up-to-date hotel north of San Francisco. Cuisine unsur- 
passed. Two garages In connection. 

HEALDSBURG. CAL.— The Union Hotel. Wade H. Etter. Opposite 
the plaza. Special attention to auto parties. First class accommodations. 
Commodious garage. 



Keenan Bros. 



Automoblte Engineers, Machinists and Blacksmiths. 



273 Valencia Street, San Francisco. 



Telephone Market 1985 



IGNITION 

TROUBLES 

AVOIDED 



and at less expense and inconven- 
ience to you than at present. Rent 
your batteries from Auto Ignition Co. 
709-711 Octavla St. Phone Market 6«78. 



Vulcanizing 



MARTLAND, PEART & ELKINGTON 



Phone Market 6370. 



42 Van Ness Avenue. 



San Francisco, Cal 



of San Francisco 



4S9"Golden Gate Avenue 




1910 MODELS HAVE ARRIVED 

S. G. RAYL 
Northern California Representative 

583-591 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco. 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 84, L909 




THE BE5T PART OF THE SHAVE 
IS WHEN YOU COME TO 

Pond's Extract 

Relieves Irritation 

Prevents Inflammation 

Assures Comfort 

Used by men of discrimination 
everywhere. Sold only in sealed 
bottles— never in bulk. Write 
for interesting booklet on shav- 
ing. — mailed free on request. 

L.-imont. Corliss & Co.. 78 Hudson St. 
Sole Agents. New York 



MANZANITA HALL 

A School for Boys, Palo Alto, Cal. 
"Will give your boy a thorough preparation for college, while 
training him to be strong, self-reliant and manly. Special attention 
given to preparation for Stanford. Absence of rigid classification 
permits rapid advancement. Ample facilities for athletic sports. 
Write for illustrated catalogue. 

W. A. SHEDD, HEAD MASTER. 



Miss Head's School 

2S38 CHANNING 'WAY, BERKELEY, CAL. 
Boarding and day school for girls, accredited to the University of 
California, Stanford. Vassar, Smith and Wellesley; 22nd year 
begins August 9. 1909. 

MARY E. WILSON, M. L.. PRINCIPAL 



Miss Harker's School 

Palo Alto, California 

Boarding and day school for girls. Certificate admits to college. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Special attention given 
to music, arts and crafts. Catalogue upon application. Eigrhth 
year begins August 16, 1909. 



A. W. Besl 



Best's Art School 



1628 Bush Street 



Life Classes 
Day and Night 



Illustrating 
Sketching 
Painting 



Goodyear "Hippo" Hose 




Best and Wrongest Garden Hose 
Stand 600 lbs. pressure. Any length 

Goodyear Rubber Company 

R. H. PEASE. President, 

587. 589. 591 Market Street 



Union Lumber Company 

Redwood and Pine Lumber 

Redwood Ties. Telegraph Poles, Shing-les, Split Shakes, Etc. 

Main Office — Crocker Bldg-., San Francisco 

Yards and Planing Mills— Sixth and Channel Sts.. San Francisco 

R. Bujannoff 

MANUFACTURING JEWELER 

AND 

DIAMOND SETTER 

Phone. Oooitai 1833. SI LICK PLACE, off Sutter, between Keim; and Montgomery 





"Where are you going this summer ?" Mrs. Jones asked of 
Mrs. Briggs, who happened to be sitting next to her at the table. 
The masculine members of the Saturday Dinner Club had 
pushed back their chairs and were intent on an assortmenl of 
dark and light "smokes;" the cheese and coffee having been 
advised to tarry awhile in the larder of the big restaurant, while 
the rest of the somewhat sumptuous dinner adjusted itself to the 
requirements of the assembled club digestion. Mrs. Briggs an- 
swered in an off-hand and mind-made-up manner, rather char- 
acteristic of that lath . 

"Righl here at home. You don'i catch me trotting off to any 
summer resort, when 1 can be ten limes as comfortable in my 
own bedroom and bathroom." 

"Not going away at all?" Miss Simmons asked, with painfully 
lifted eyebrows. 

"Not going away ai all?" Mrs. Briggs echoed, with slightly 
altered inflection. 

*'l like to travel as well as anybody docs; but I never travel for 
pleasure. When I go away on a train it is always for some defin- 
ite purpose. I go away to see some place or thillg or persim. and 

I haven't any delusions about having a good time while Cm on 
the way. There isn't anything more miserable in this world than 
•traveling — the actual act of traveling. The joy is entirely in 
retrospect, or in the feeling that you've accomplished what you 
-et out to do. T don't care " 

•*llid you ever hear anything as well trained as that traveling 
man's wife?" Bill Smith snorted. "Say, Briggsie, bow did you 
do it? Wish to the Lord 1 could get a few such ideas of travel 
into my small wile's head. Mrs. S. thinks the life of a drummer 
is one round of delights, and 1 can't make her believe it's work." 

"If you'd get thin and pensive, instead of I'at and cross, she 
might," Bob White assured him. 

"1 never said I thought it was one round of delights," the little 
lady protested. "All T said was that I thought it 71 be fun for 
me to go along with you once in a while. T wasn't thinking aboui 
your part of it at all. If T thought I was having a good time, 
1 don't see what difference it would make to you." 

"Might interfere with some of his — er — work." Brown sug- 
gested. "Bill does work awful bard, don't von know?" 

"You must have run into some unusually disagreeable ex- 
periences on trains," Mrs. Johnson said, drawing her chair 
close to that of Mrs. Briggs. "I still belong to the great herd 

of those who think it's jolly fun to get on a sleeper and go some- 
where." 

"I suppose I never entirely got over my first experience," the 
dnwn-on-i ravel lady explained. "1 was just a slip of a girl, and 
IM never been anywhere, and 1 bad the wildest dreams about go- 
ing out. into the great wide world and conquering it. 1 must 
have been about Hi, and you know the dreams a girl in Ihe cod- 
fish stage has. T had an uncle that operated some coast-wise 
freighters all along the Atlantic seaboard, and he wrote mv 
mother that if she'd send me to Baltimore that summer, he'd 
pick me up and lake me along for a good month's cruise. His 
wife and two daughters and some other young girls were to be 
in the crowd. I'd worked pretty hard in school, and the doctor 
told mother it 'd be the best thing in the world for me. Of 
course, there would lie sonic one going East about that time to 
lake me to where the relatives would meet me." 

"I bad been across the continent twice by myself when I was 
that age." Miss Simmons said, superciliously. 

"Well, I hadn't." was Mrs. Briggs' ample reply. '"And mother 
wouldn't have considered the thing for a minute if she71 sup- 
posed I'd have to go alone. As it turned out, the ticket was 
bought and everything arranged. 1 was to go with a lady as far 
as Washington, and she'd made the sleeper reservation in her 
own name, and it was all settled, as we thought. Then the 
morning of the day we were to start, she got a telegram com- 
pletely changing all her plans. She bad to go to New Orleans 
instead of Washington, and that left me with no one to escort 
me." 

"Couldn't you put it oft' till there was some one going?" Mrs. 
Smith said, solicitously. 

"There wouldn't be any of our friends going for several days, 
anil that would have made me miss the boat and the whole trip. 



Jul-s ''I. 1909 



and California Advertiser 



31 



You may be bum [ didii'i advocate anything of the sort. T was 
for starting right off by myself. I had to change ears ai Cin- 
cinnati] and father telegraphed to a friend to meel me there and 
see that I got on the right train; lint there wasn'i one of us who 
thought about the sleeper. When 1 went into the common day 
coach I didn't think about it. either; hut after a while 1 began 
io get sleepy, and I told the conductor I wanted to go to bed. 
Then 1 remembered that the reservation had been made in Mrs. 
Swift's name, and I supposed it had been exchanged tor a berth 
on the south-bound train. And as luck would have it, the one 
sleeper on our train was packed to the roof." 

"I'd rather sit up any time than take an upper," Mrs. Jones 
remarked, absently. 

"I didn't sit up," Mrs. Briggs laughed. "I curled down in 
the seat. Luckily 1 had one all to myself, and I put my travel- 
ing bag at one end for a pillow. Along in the night I awoke 
with the worst cramps, in every part of my anatomy, you could 
imagine. I tried two or three times to straighten myself out, and 
I almost cried with the pain. And I remember distinctly sitting 
up and raking the cinders out of my ear. My hair was 
matted thick with them, and they had got inside my collar and 
half way down my waist, and I was almost as black as a darkey. 
I didn't know enough to fee the porter for an early visit to the 
dressing room in the sleeper, so I rubbed most of the grime off 
on my handkerchief, and I hadn't the first idea about how to get 
breakfast, so I just did without any till a kind-hearted old lady 
in the seat across the aisle took pity on me and gave me a sand- 
wich. It was fcrnr in the afternoon when we got into Baltimore, 
and that was all I had had to eat. And mv uncle wasn'l there 
to meet me. His boat didn't land tilt late at night. [lad extra 
freight to handle somewhere farther down the coast, and I didn't 
know what to do." 

"I should think you would have gone to a hotel." Miss Sim- 
mons suggested. "That's what 1 should have dene under the 
circumstances." 

"That's what T did — and such a hotel as il was! There were 
about I'orly men all crying their hotels and cabs and things, and 
I got SO confused r didn't know which way to turn. I'ivtl\ soon 
T heard a man call. 'Vera line hotel, jus! two blocks.' Well, you 
know my name's Vera, and I jumped to the conclusion that my 
uncle had sent him down there to meel me. I was tired enough 
and frightened enough to jump a I anv BOrl id' conclusion, and I 
\ven1 rigid over to him and saiil I'd go along with him." 

"How dangerous!" Mrs. Johnson murmured. 

"Yes, but it turned out all right in (he end. I think mv poor 
knees almost gave out under me when he led me throng 
front door of an Italian saloon. 1 afterwards realized that his 
'Vera' was actually intended for 'very,' but I didn'l think o 
For ever so long. When I got upstairs to the dining room and 
told the landlad) who I was and where I was going, shi fathered 

nle up in her arms ami said my uncle's men always put up at 
her little hot. 'I when they were in Baltimore, and thai once the 
great sea captain had slept there himself, and -he'd have m 
down Io the boat as soon as it landed." 

"Well, wasn'i that luck?" Mrs. Smith exclaimed. 

'•Anil. oil. how I devoured those awful Italian dishes' Thought 

of turning in a general fire alarm several times; but T kept a 
glass of ice water within easy reach, where I could quench the 

burning of nn mouth 01 casionaHj . \ml 1 think the sort of din- 
ner 1 bad. on such a frightfully i ■ . .int stomach, had something 
Io do with i if you don't mind lying — mv sea 

C. If ever vou wan' lo gel genuinelv seasick, 
food all day, then ea! a mess of ravioli and spaghetti and M lan- 
aise rice and fricasseed hard-hoile.! eggs, the way they do them 
in ll.ilv. Then stari out on a choppy sea in a little tub of a 
freighter, « ll-developed case of indigestion to 

with, and you'll have something to remember as long as vou 
live. I wauled to jump overboard several times and end it all." 

ii's characteristic." White put in. "When you firsl 
lo lie seasick you're afraid you'll die. and after a while you're 
inn won't. What was the ai on your health'-" 

"The doctor said it was the besl 'diiiiLT that ever happi 
me. I>nl it didn't make me love travel a hit more for that." — 
Fnuil,- Hill-fin. in (• 



ENNEN'S 



BORATED 
TALCUM 



Try Murine Eye Remedy 




5WDER 



PRICKLY HEAT, 
CHAFING, and 
SUNBURN, ZFr&'ilSI?*™™ 

"A llllle higher In price, perhaps, then vrorlhlrtl tabilt- 



"'!!' 



i all odorotpci 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronson, Notary Public. 2004 Sutter street, corner Fillmore 
street. All legal papers drawn up accurately. Phone West 3016. 

MARK LANE, Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds. 245 Bush 
Street. Phone Temp. 2629. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Barnes tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavia. Telephone Fell 9911. 

' DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly of James Flood Building, 814 Eddy 
street, San Francisco, Cat. 

ATTORNEYS- AT- LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Drs. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Rlegelhaupt, Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly 
of 6 Geary street, remove corns entirely whole; painless, without knife. 
Bunions and in-growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 
205-206 Westbank Building, 830 Market street. San Francisco. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES. 
People's Express Company. Baggage checked to all parts of the United 
States at the hotels and residences in Oakland. Alameda and Berkeley. 
Special attention to trans-bay baggage. Phones Oakland 4447; Alameda 
456; Berkeley 14; San Francisco. Kearny 579. 



Plan to Visit 

Yosemite Valley 

OPEN ALL YEAR 

An Ideal Place to Spend 
Your Vacation 



Surroundings perfect for rest tnd recreation 
Good Hotels. Camps, Private Camping, Ex- 
penses reduced to popular prices. 



NOW REACHED BY RAIL-A QUICK. COMFORTABLE TRIP. Take Southern 
Pacific or Santa Fe to Merced. A scenic ride through ihe Merced Canyon. Three hours 
and a half by stage through the Park. Ask for descriptive folder, giving details. 



0. W. LEHMER, Traffic Mgr., Merced, Cal. 




ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
Savage Gold and Silver Mining Company 

Location of principal place of business. San Francisco, California. Location of works 
Virginia Mining District. Storey County, State of Nevada 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting or me Board of Directors held on the ajd day 
of June, looo, an assessment :ents per share was levied upon the 

capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately in United Mates gold coin, to the 
secretary at the office of the company, room no. No. 3*0 Bush St., San Francisco. Calif. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 28th day of July, 
tooo, will be delinquent anj advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment 
is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 18th Jay of Aug.. igog.to pay the delin- 
quent assessment, together with the cost of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By ord»r of the Board of Dtr. JOHN W. TWIGGS. Secretary. 

Office: Room ti6, No. jjq Bush Street. San Francisco, California. 

Rriichnc Back to our old location 623 Sacramento Street between 
DI LiMlv > Kearny and Montgomery Streets 

With full line of Brushes. Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 
to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets. Chamois. 
Metal Polish, and Cleaning Powders. Hardware, Wood and Willow Ware. 
Call, write or telephone Kearny I 

Wm_ Buchanan 



For Red. Weak. Wearv. Waterv Eves. Granulated Eyelids and Pink 
Eyes. Murine Doesn't Smart. Soothes Eye Pain. Compounded by Ex- 

Kerlenced Phvsic-ians; Contains no Injurious or Prohibited Drugs Try 
[urine for Tour Eve Troubles. You Will Like Murine. Try It in Baby's 
Eye* for Scaly Evelids All Druggists Sell Murine at SOc. 



ALFRED BANNISTER 



ACCOUNTANT AND 

1+24 Post Street 
Public Expert 



AUDITOR 

San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 2871 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 24, 1909 




BANKING 



THE SUN, THE WIND, AND THE RAIN. 

The dawn, the wind, and the sun ! 

Oh, the brisht hours of love 
When the soft wind blows the scent of the rose 3 

And the brave sun shines above ! 

The sun, the rain, and the wind — 

Ay, how the strong days go 
When the great winds cry aloft in the sky 

And the rain but brings the bow? 

The dusk, the mist, and the rain: 

Ah. the gray twilight brief 
When the chill winds strain through the trees in pain 

And beat on the fallen leaf. 

The calm, the stars, and the night. 

And oh. for that journey far 
When the soul shall find what there lies behind, 

And leap to the utmost star ! 
—Charles Buxton doing, -from "Star-Glow and Song." 



OMNIA SOMNIA. 



Dawn drives the dreams away, yet some abide. 

Once in a tide of pale and sunless weather, 
I dreamed I wandered on a bare hillside, 

When suddenly the birds sang all together. 

Still it was Winter, even in the dream; 

There was no leaf nor bud nor young grass springing; 
The skies shone cold above the frost-bound stream : 

It was not Spring, and yet the birds were singing. 

Blackbird and thrush and plaintive willow-wren. 
Chaffinch and lark and linnet, all were calling ; 

A golden web of music held me then, 
Innumerable voices, rising, falling. 

Oh, never do the birds of April sing 

More sweet than in that dream T still remember; 
Perchance the heart may keep its song of Spring 

Even through the wintry dream of life's December. 
— Rosamund Marriott Watson in The Athenaeum, London. 



THE TURN OF THE ROAD. 

Soft, gray buds on the willow. 

Warm, moist winds from the bay, 
Sea-gulls out on the sandy beach. 
And a road my eager feet would reach. 

That leads to the Far-away. 

Dust on the wayside flower, 

The meadow-lark's luring tone 
Is silent now, from the grasses tipped 
With dew at the dawn, the pearls have slipped — 

Far have I fared alone. 

And then, by the alder thicket 

The turn of the road — and you ! 
Though the earth lie white in the noonday heat, 
Or the swift, storm follow our hurrying feet, 

What do we care — we two ! 

— Alice Rolitt Coe in Scribner's Magazine. 



WEDDING PRESENTS. 
The choicest variety to select from at Marsh's, corner Cali- 
fornia and Polk streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



ESTABLISHED 1867 



Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 6,000,000 



HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO 
B. E. WALKER, President 

ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager 

TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are is- 
sued in denominations of 

$10, $20, $50, $100, and $200 
and the exact amount payable in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland is stated on the face of each cheque, while in other countries 
they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager. 

San Francisco Office — California and Sansome Streets. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
526 California Street, San Francisco, California. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,504,498.68 

Deposits, June 30, 1909 36,793.234.04 

Total Assets 39,435,681.38 

Remittance may be made by Draft, Post Office or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 
money orders, or coin by express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock m., and Saturday evenings from 7 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock p. in. 
for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS — President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; 
Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant 
Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secre- 
tary, A. H. Muller; Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, Ign. 
Steinhardt, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse, 
and W. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission street, between 21st and 22d street. 
For receipt and payment of deposits only. C. W. Heyer, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 432 Clement St., between 5th and 6th 
avenues. For receipt and payment of Deposits only. W. C. Heyer, man- 
ager. 

Central TrusT: Company of California 

Market and Sansome Sts. Branches 3039 16th St.; 624 Van Ness Avenue. 

Accounts of individuals, Arms, corporations, unions, societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts. Drafts sold on all parts of the world. 
Capital paid in, $1,500,000. Surplus, $100,000. 

B. G. TOGNA2ZI, Manager. 



French Savings Bank 



108 SUTTER ST., NEAR MONTGOMERY. 

Paid-up Capital $600,000 

Total Assets $4,270,800 

Strictly a savings bank. Open Saturday evenings from 7 to 8:30. 

OFFICERS— Charles Carpy, President; Arthur Legallet, First Vice- 
President; Leon Bocqueraz, Second Vice-President; A. Bousquet, Secre- 
tary; A. Bergerot, Attorney. 

DIRECTORS — N. C. Babin. J. A. Bergerot, O. Bozlo, Charles Carpy, 
Arthur Legallet, G. Beleney, H. de St. Seine, J. M. Dupas, Leon Boc- 
queraz, J. E. Artlgues, J. S. Godeau, John GInty. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT. 

The French-American Bank occupies offices in the same building.. 

Italian-American Bank 

S. E. Corner Montgomery and Sacramento Sts. 

Paid-up Capital - $750,000 

Surplus 210,000.00 

Conduct general banking business. Dealers in foreign exchange. 
Officers — A. Sbarboro, President; A. E. Sbarboro, Cashier; H. J. 
Crocker, Vice-President; R. A. Sbarboro. Assistant Cashier. 

Anglo and London Paris National Bank 

N. B. CORNER SANSOME AND PINE STREETS. 



Capital, $4,000,000. 



Surplus, $1,350,000 



SIG. GREENEBAUM, President; H. FLEISHHACKER. Vice-President 
and Manager; J. FRIEDLANDER. Vice-President; C. F. HUNT, Vice- 
President: R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier; A. HOCHSTEIN. Assistant Cashier; 
F. E. BECK, Assistant Cashier. 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit, available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 

"IT IS IGNORANCE THAT WASTES 
EFFORT." TRAINED SERVANTS USE 

SAPOLIO 






.lu.Y -.'4. 1909 



and California Advertiser 



33 




INSVKAM 




The Realty Purchasing Company, promoted by Joshua E. 
Yontz, to be the holding company for the Pasadena Fire Insur- 
a Company, will liquidate its affairs and surrender its char- 
ter — so there is an end of the Pasadena Fire Insurance Com- 
pany of Lower California. The purchasing company was capi- 
talized for $1,000,000, and efforts were made to sell this stock 
(par value $100) at $1.10 to provide for promotion expenses. 
Three hundred thousand shares were issued on the start to 
different parties "for services rendered,"' which so badly handi- 
capped the project that it was practically killed at its very in- 
ception. 

* * * 

The Hollen Parker Company has begun suit in the Superior 
Court of Walla Walla, Wash., against Dorsey M. Hill, receiver 
of the Walla Walla Insurance Company, to compel the setting 
aside of a $50,000 mortgage held by Hill to be an asset of the 
insurance company. The reported assets of the company are 
given as $260,714, against which are claims of $271,000, of 
which total $148,098 are approved. 

* * * 

A. (J. Sanderson, of New York, has been appointed Assistant 
General Agent of the Pacific Coast Department of the Aetna 
of Hartford, at San Francisco, under General Agent E. C. 
Morrison, and will enter upon his duties on August 1st. Mr. 
Sanderson comes from the home office of the Continental, where 
he occupied the position of general agent, which position he re- 
signed to go with the Aetna. He is a well known and accom- 
plished underwriter. Mr. Sanderson was here during the ad- 
justment of the San Francisco losses in 1906, and was at that 

time with the Aetna. 

* * * 

The figures showing San Francisco premiums for the lirst 
half of the present year exhibit a material reduction when com- 
pared with those of a similar period last year. The Home of 
New York leads with $199,190; the Liverpool & Lund..!! & Globe 
follows with $182,206: then follow the Royal with $115,745; 
Aetna, $97,740; Northern, $73,089; National, $69,108; V« 
Zealand, $64,796; Springfield, $56,800; Phoenix of Hartford, 
$55,549; and the California with $48,997. The reduction is in 
a measure due to the return of mercantile establishments from 
the high-rated districts on Van Ness avenue and Fillmore streets 

to I ln> down-town quarter, where, owing to the better quality of 
tlie buildings, rales are much lower. 

* » * 

Hugh Craig, a broker, has Sled a protest with the San Fran- 
cisco Board of Supervisors againal the ordinance impos 
yearly tax of $5 on all lire insurance solicitors who represent 

more than one insurance company. lie 'hum- thai the law is 

illegal, on account of being discriminatory, as it exempts the 
representatives of single companies. Craig is backed by the San 
Francisco Brokers' Exchange, and a determined efforl will he 

made for I he repeal of the ordinance. 

« * • 

John 11. Shiveley, insurance commissioner of Washington, bus 

tiled Ins answer and demurrer to the articles of impeachment 
erred againsl him in the Washington 1 . gislature, making a 
general denial of all the allegations, and. in particular, states 
that the department stands high in the estimation of practically 
all the companies doing business in the State. 

* * * 

I'hr Pacific Mutual Lite has made K. C. Goodspeed m 
of us lite department at Chicago. Mr. Qoodspeed has been with 
the Phoenix Mutual Life. 

* • * 

Branch offices of -lie Continental Casualty in the Pacific 

Northwest, formerly operating from Portland headquarti - 
ter report direct to San Fran 

* * * 

There will be no change in the general agenc] a l l an & 
li. owing to Mr. Rehfisch. Mr. Dun- 

can w ill eon t inn 



The 1 oion Central has closed its Seattle office ami re 
from Washington. S. B. E. Seese has been the manager. 

* * * 

Manager Ben J. Smith, of the Connecticut's Pacini Cos 

partment, has had the province of Alberta added to his field. 

* * * 

Copies of forty-four forms made necessary by the new Cali- 
fornia standard fire policy, which goes into effect August 1st, 
have been sent out by the Pacific Board to each recording agent 

in the State, and a stock will be kept on hand. 

* * * 

General Agent Stovel, of San Francisco, has appointed Brown- 
lie & McCutehen agents at Denver of the Sovereign Fire. The 

company has entered Oregon. 

* * * 

The Los Angeles Association has protested against the prac- 
tice of policy writing by special agents. 

* * * 

The latest resignation from the Bankers' Fire is that of J. M. 

Hunter, treasurer. 

* * * 

The estate of the late George C. Boardman has been appraised 
at $200,016, most of. which is invested in San Francisco bonds 

and stocks. 

* * * 

The Home of New York has appointed J. S. Suydam special 
agent at Los Angeles, with Charles Quitzow. Mr. Suydam has 

been at the home office in New York. 

* * * 

The Western Union Life, 'of Seattle is to build a home of its 
own on Madison street. 

The California Business Men's Insurance Association of Los 
Angeles will be operated as a fraternal. 

The Pacific Mutual will loan the Bohemian Club $250,000 
for building purposes. 

Washington follows the ruling of Commissioner Wolf, of 
California, and refuses to license the slot-machine accident in- 
surance agent. 

President Succop, of the German Fire, is making a tour of the 
Coast. 

Thomas L. Sharman has sued the Continental Fire to recover 
$1,500 on a policy of insurance. 

The Gamewell Fire Alarm Co. will put in fifty fire alarm boxes 
in the down-town district. 

President White, of the city of New York Insurance Company, 
is visiting San Francisco. 

General Manager Samuel, of the Oregon Life, has been tour- 
mi; California. 

The Spring Garden has appointed Samuel Behrendt agent at 
Los Angeles. 

Noel II. Jacks has returned from an extended northern trip. 



Murine Is a Domestic Eye Remedy. 
Reliable Relief for Eyes That Need Care. Doesn't Smart. Soothes. 



WHY? 



Ask the man who sold you your ready-made shirts 
why he had those for his personal use made to 
order 



WHY? 



D. C HEGER, 243 Kearny St, San Francisco 

Shirts and Underwear to Order Phone Douglas 3641 




Phone 
Franklin 780a 

An and Refine- 
neat ire Dis- 
placed by Taste- 
ful Attire 

• MAKERS OF-- 



LADIES' GOWNS and FANCY COSTUMES 



l.i:i SITTER STREET. Near Van Ness Ave. 



San Francisco. Cal. 



34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 24, 1909 



fetation 



I thought I knew the way; it seemed to me 

To lie through meadow? and along the banks 
Of quiet streams. I thought the satin sea 
Eobed sinuous shores; ancl that the heath and lea 
Blazed red and ochre where the drowsy hee 
■ Gave its creator thanks. 

Sometimes I fear that I have lost the way: 

Here where I walk drifts slowly from the fen 

Chill, vampire mist, streakt,. stratified with gray, 

That, sluggish, hangs to branches, gaunt and splay : 

Beneath the talons of the bloodless fay 
Lie waterfall and glen. 

But though my feet mark heavily the miles 

That stretch unlit by any friendly gleam, 
Yet give my brush the mast'yy that beguilp* 
Or let me hew from stone the face that smiles, 
Then, though I perish in the wastes' defiles. 
The way were bright in dream. 

Mabel Pokteu Pitts. 



THE PORTOLA FESTIVAL. 

All the world knows by this time that the greatesl Eestava] 
of the present era will take place this year, commencing on the 
19th of October and continuing till the 23d, and every one who 
can read realizes by this time that Caspar de Portola. the first 
Governor of California, will make his reappearance, reincarnated 
as it were, and king it over the festival during that period; but 
every ope does not know that he is to have a bodyguard of 106 
dragoons, who will be picked from the flower of the youth of 
California. 

From time immemorial kings and emperors have had their 
special bodyguard chosen from the sons of the nobility, and no 
honor is more closely treasured than to be deemed worthy of this 
position. 

The King's Scottish bodyguard at one time was a very realis- 
tic affair, indeed, for those who served were responsible for the 
safety of the king as soon as he had crossed the border, and 
never relaxed for one single second in their watchfulness until 
he had returned to the lower countries again. 

Thus, to carry out the old world ideas, Gaspar de Portola 
will be surrounded during his visit by 106 dragoons, gloriously 
uniformed and mounted on black chargers, and as all the youths 
of California are noble, by reason of that great freedom of birth 
that makes all Americans God's noblemen, it is difficult to realize 
how, from so many, a choice can be made. 

However, hope should ever be alive in all our breasts, and it 
is hard to imagine any greater honor than riding a-field with 
Gaspar de Portola in October, nor in all that splendid pageantry 

will there be anything more dazzling than those 106 drag 3 

riding abreast on their coal-black steeds. 



"I'm an author, you understand, spending my vacation on 

a farm to get local color. How much will board be?" "Ten per 
week," replied the farmer, "and $2 extra if we're expected to talk 
dialect." — Kansas City Journal. 



"Did you have a pleasant time at the picnic, Ronald? I 

trust that you remembered to Fletcherize, and masticate each 
mouthful one hundred times." "Yes'm, an' while I was chewin' 
my first bite the other boys et up all the grub." — Life. 



Youngley — Did you ever notice that the matrimonial 

process is like that of making a call ? You go to adore, you ring 
a belle, and you give your name to a maid. Cynicus — Yes. and 
■then vou're taken in. — London Answers. 



PURE MILK FOR BABY. 



Sanitary milk production was first started by Gail Borden in the earlv 
50's. The best systems to-day are largely based on his methods, but 
none are so thorough and so rigidly enforced as the Borden System. For 
over fifty years the Eagle Brand Condensed Milk has proved Its claim aa 
the best food for Infants. 



T S r 



Wf^^^^A 



HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLERS 



Bear the script name of 

Stewart Hartshorn on label. 



\ 



Get "Improved," no tacks required 

Wood Rollers Tin Rollers 



Fire Marine Automobile 

fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, $1,500,000 



Assets, $7,000,000 



California and Saneome Streets, 
San Francisco, California. 



Cash Capital, $200,000. Cash Assets, J629.181.H5 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 
Employers' Liability, General Liability. Teams, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective. Vessels, Burglary. Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green. President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothin. Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man. F. P. Deerlng. E. F. Green, James K. Moffltt, J. W. Phillips, 
Henry Rosenfeld. Adolph A. Son, William S. Tevls. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building. San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company. General Agents for California, 422 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,462,789 

Total Cash A3sets 6,365,877 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL, BUILDING. 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. Ltd. 

Of Liverpool. 

Capital J6.700.000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE 4 CO., Agents. 
320 SANSOME STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

The Weft Coaft Life Insurance Co. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



A strong, well managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy formi. 

National Fire Insurance Company of Hartford 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

CAPITAL $1,000,000.00 

ASSETS 8.260,000.00 

SURPLUS TO POLICY HOLDERS 3.178.458.64 

McNEAR & WAYMAN, GENERAL AGENTS, 

National Building, San Francisco 

Roy C. Ward Jas. K. Polk Jas. W. Dean Geo. E. Billincs 

Geo. E. Billings Company 

ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED 
313 California Street San Francisco. Cal. Phone Douglas 228J 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Organized 1853. Cash Capital, $3,000,000 

Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 
anywhere in United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss 
by fire, lightning, wind storm or tornado. Indemnity for loss of rental 
income by fire or lightning. 

H. L. ROFF. General Agent. J. J. SHEAHAN. Ass't General Agent 
38 Sutter St., San Francisco. Cal. 




g£M ? 5^!? , *e% 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coaat. 




VOL. LXXV1I1 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 31, 1909 



No. 5 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market St, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway. C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



They say when La Follette and Aldricb (.toss swords, 

Taft pulls his chair up to the window and listens and smiles. 

Some one suggests that the Aldrich-Payne tariff bill be 

abbreviated to read All-pain bill. A good suggestion. Tell it to 
Taft. . 

That "personally conducted" tariff lias si ruck an open 

swtteh, but it is not believed that any valuables were Inst or 
bones broken. 

It is niee of Bryan to make no charge for the advice be 

gives President Taft from time to time; besides, wind is cheap 
out in Nebraska. 

Caruso says he is getting too much publicity "because of 

his wonderful voiee. Kicking after working the press for years! 
He can't mean it. 

Dayton, Ohio, takes the cake. The Journal Bays it printed 

an edition of itself in a balloon. Hut perhaps — no, not that, 
for it is a prohibition town. 

When the sky is full of airships, will nol the question of 

madhouses he a perplexing problem? Still, where there is a 

will a way is generally discovered. 

Castro should sav "-hake'" to the ex-boss of Persia and 

also of Turkey. But, better still, lei them enter into a tripartite 
agreement to settle down and be good. 

The President and the Congress have me! at the cross- 
roads of very doubtful expedients, and it will take a few daya 
to ascertain which is on the hack track. 

Now will prohibition cranks please subside? A liquor 

trust has been formed in Maine. Hut Maine has alwB] 

careful not to gel entirely out of the article. 

The President's salary has ool been raised recently, hut 

an additional $85,000 a year is given him for travelii a 

Why not? Doesn't he need it in his husinessr 

An Eastern hank-wrecker laments thai he "hasn't 

on earth." His conduct as banker docs not SUggesI that his 
hank account in heaven has much to the good, either. 

While about the good work of restricting playing upon 

mi cal instruments to reasonable hours, why not have a word. 
to say to cats, dogs, drunken men and women, too? 

The wa\ things are running in Washington, the next 

platform of both parties will simply he "We point will 
and view with alarm." Put the people like to he Few 

The Nationalists of Persia and Turkey have overthrown 

absolutism, and the same article lias bad a jolt in Russia. Will 
China he the next to get down off the perch of csai 

Xo doubt California will he delighted to know 

dent William Howard Taft will open the golf tournamen' 
here during Poitols week. Cares of Stale have to he b 

And now ,omes to the front a new kind of a pnblii 

lie has a plan to reform the saloon without disturbing 
any one or reducing quantity per drink. As yet In- • 



Arresting' clairvoyants is foolish unless their stock of 

ghosts is run in, too. 

Patriots who have an itching palm for public office and 

have not announced their purpose, should hurry up before the 
rush grows greater. 

They are going to resubmit the Geary project. All right, 

hut don't make the cost run up into millions. The road is needed, 
hut not gold lined anil diamond studded. 

There you are. One who knows says men spend more 

money for clothes than women. Put who makes the money? It 
is important to look into that end of the question. 

Over in France the Payne-Aldrich hill is spoken of as the 

"accumulated appetites of particular interests," which is not 
had for French wit : besides, it is true, which is the worst of it. 

Chicago is trying very hard to discount our graft business, 

and the chances arc it will he a howling success, for they have 
been getting pointers from us for three years — prosecution and 
all. 

It is mean to sav that Rockefeller never plays poker be- 
cause the chances are about even at that game. The fact is, 
Mr. Rockefeller never indulges in any game of chance, lie plays 
sure things, always. 

It is to he observed that Boston's women-folk evince less 

desire every year to acquire suffrage. Often if takes Boston 
girls a little time to get hack into the traces of genuine woman- 
hood, hut they get there. 

Do you know why Americans returning from abroad de- 
nounce our customs house svslcm'' Asks the man who ransacks 
their baggage in a wild hunt for smuggled goods :m<\ the like. 
Thai is why. he will tell you. 

San Francisco is beginning a tug of war of her own. 

It is between two hundred men for possession of thirty-one pub- 
lic offices. What the war will cost each warrior in cash is to he 

a confidential matter Eorei 11 

Where is the limit? Joaquin Miller is burning up to 

establish a home for | ta in California. Bui suppose such a 

I were established, would California nave to send bi 

the mountains for eligible inmates? 
It is practically settled that 'thaw is not insane. He says 

he is not, and the authorities are very tired of having him 
around. Just hold on and things will come your way — by the 
■my of cash '■ mo e I law 

The tariff stand-p liters arc wobbling a little, hut Can- 
non and Aldrich are bracing them up. and by next winter they 
hope to convince (he country that "downward," when it comes 
to tinkering with the tariff always means "upward." 

And all this comes from 'lie schools 

proper support. A New Hampshire town ordered the 

lights turned out, hoping the little brown-tail moth- WO 

attracted by the m i and quit pestering the villa- 

"Near-beer" is 30 near the real article that no 

to know more about it. All the same, it answers every purpose, 

which is evidenced by the fact that prohibition town- tin,] no 
fault with it. There ;- .11 one way to skin ,1 

oneself. 

Th.' patriotism that is urging six candidates for 

office is something worth contemplating, hut when thing 
good and hot all along the line, more than liki nil lx' 

plenty of reason to doubt nearly all of them. . not. 

The man n 8an Francisco. He 

be run down and chained to tl 




If the people of San Francisco 
Put an End to It. could be brought to realize the effect 

of the so-called graft eases upon 
the business life of the city, no doubt there would speedily be a 
demonstration in the direction of public condemnation of the 
partisan and blundering work of the graft prosecution. If the 
prosecution could discover or unearth something definite and 
tangible in the way of evidence of wrong-doing on the part of 
the defendants, or if the public could be convinced that the 
prosecution was actuated by an honest and sincere desire to vin- 
dicate the dignity of the law. which is alleged to have been out- 
raged and trampled upon, or if those in charge of the machinery 
of the law would present convincing proof, justified by known 
facts — facts not fancies nor ill-shapen theories of an unbridled 
imagination, intensified by unholy hatred and ambition — the 
public would rest its soul in peace and patience, but not any- 
thing other than vain boasting of "what we shall do'" comes to 
the public's ears or eyes from the silence or the wise glare of 
the prosecution. This sort of a Punch and Judy show has been 
a continuous performance for more than three years, without 
a single climax or a change between acts. No wonder the public 
is tired. 

At the beginning of the prosecution, public sentiment held 
up the hands of the District Attorney's office, believing it had 
convincing proof that the Supervisors had been debauched by a 
party or parties of conspicuous standing in the community, but 
when it came to producing convicting testimony, the best the 
prosecution could do was to prove by its own witnesses that they 
bad confessed their crime for a price, which was immunity from 
punishment for such confession, and when asked on the witness 
stand who it was that debauched them they did not know and 
could not identify any one with the other end of the robbery. 
Thus they fooled the prosecution, got all they wanted, kept the 
bribe money and left the prosecution in the lurch. 

For reasons of this kind and for stupidity that amounted to 
idiocy, the people are disgusted and want the books cleared of 
the history of the whole affair. The prosecution admits, by in- 
ference at least, that it has no evidence of guilt other than that 
which is the product of an imagination and a burning desire 
for further political preferment. Put an end to the humbug- 
gery at once, says public sentiment. 



Although the proposed amendment 
Income Tax Proposition, to the national Constitution to au- 
thorize Congress to impose an in- 
come tax is still in a state of incubation, the people of the whole 
country are taking a lively interest in the question. The public 
has been taught by experience as well as by observation that the 
Constitution cannot be, or never is, amended except at the ex- 
pense of the rights of the States in their individuality. 
^ The Fathers of the Republic were careful to draft and the 
States to adopt a form of fundamental principles, chief of 
which was the principle of federation which provided no place 
for the principle of nationalism. However, the Hamiltonian 
school of statecraft did in that early day of the Republic's life 
rather lean toward a greater degree of centralization of the 
political power of the country in the hands of the "many in one," 
or central authority by circumscribing the authority of the 
State and the independence of the sovereign, and all plans and 
desire to extend the power of the Washington authority comes 
from the seed that was planted by the great Alexander Hamilton, 
a man who never was at heart a true believer in the stability of 
any Government as loose-jointed as the Declaration of Independ- 
ence and the Constitution provides for. 

Were Hamilton alive to-day, he would be found in the front 
rank of the political force that is trying to so amend the Con- 
stitution that the sovereignty of the State and the sovereignty 



of the citizen would be eliminated, and the nation stand as a 
whole, possessing the power which the word "centralization" 
stands for and means. And how far away from the basic prin- 
ciples or fundamentals of the Government as founded by the 
Fathers would the income tax proposition carry the .States as a 
whole, and the people as individuals? In the first place, an in- 
come tax would be a tax upon the private income or earnings of 
the sovereign citizen in every commonwealth for the support of 
the Government of the United States, and with it would come 
an army of income tax collectors from the central Government 
over whose conduct and methods of collecting the commonwealth 
would have no jurisdiction, nor could the citizen find redress for 
abuses in any of the courts or process of law in his own State. 
The central Government would be supreme. The citizen would 
not be a sovereign of a free country, but a subject of a central- 
ized power, and his personal income would be his own to use as 
he liked, but not until he had been released from the Govern- 
ment's claim, a prior claim, by the payment of the Government's 
tax exactions, nor would he have a voice in determining what 
such exactions should be except through his representative in the 
Congress of the centralized Government. An income tax under 
compulsion by a centralized authority, together with the exist- 
ing interstate commerce law, which denies the right of a State 
to even have a voice in the supervision of the commerce of its 
own territory when either its initial or destination point is be- 
yond its own boundary lines, ought to awaken the people to the 
most alarming fact that TTamiltonianism is growing rapidly in 
this country. 

The following from Justice David Brewer, of the United 
States Supreme Court, admitted to be one of the most learned 
justices the nation has ever produced, should be read with deep 
interest by every citizen of the Republic. He says : 

"Under the hue and cry of to-day we must have an income 
tax, which means a tax on incomes, and if power to tax all in- 
come is given the Government, we will see the States taxed, not 
out of their existence, but out of their vitality. The idea leads 
up to the question of placing the entire power in the control of 
the Nation and the State is left out of the matter." 



The Blind Pigs. 



Since Philadelphia went dry, there 
is perhaps no other city in the union 
that possesses more of what is 
known to the saloon trade as "blind pigs" (a place that sells 
without a license) than San Francisco. As far as making the 
statement is concerned, there is really no need for it. We are all 
aware of it. the police should be aware of it; but there the mat- 
ter ends. Just as the pool rooms, during the racing regime, ■ 
when policemen on their beats gave the four mystic raps and 
laid their bets with the rest of the "good fellows," the "blind 
pigs" seem to be regarded by that body as a sort of necessary 
evil. "There is no way of stopping it" is the common phrase, and 
the common phrase stands for the common official conduct — 
for nobodv tries. And yet there should be nothing easier than 
to collect evidence against these people, if the evidence were 
really wanted. The general public want it, of course; the de- 
cent saloon trade, endeavoring to live up to the requirements of 
the law, want it — would be gladly willing to pay a higher license 
if the "blind pig" were abolished; but the policeman on his 
beat — well! A necessary evil can cover a multitude of sins. The 
"blind pig" (be it a rooming house for girls, a grocery that 
dispenses its refreshments at a back counter, or a pool-room) 
winks a blatant eye. In the words of the Persian, "He knows, 
he knows !" And there is little doubt that he does know the rep- 
resentative of the law on bis particular beat very well, indeed — 
better than his chief knows him. Such Platonic friendships in 
an age of commerce would prove a valuable study — if they were 
Platonic. As to their "valuableness" alone, we advise the chief 
of police to take a hand in that and find out for himself. 



July 31, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



3 



The would-be road houses in the vicinity of Golden Gate 
Park are as yet not at all disposed to take the same view of 
themselves the police commissioners adopted not Ions ago, at the 
urgent demands of the citizens of that quarter, when an order 
was passed forbidding the sale of liquor to women in those 
places. Clinging to the belief, apparently, that they still exist 
in the far and thirsty country, whore "wetness" may pass for 
an all-round sexless virtue, and not in populous, respectable 
localities, such as this district has developed into, some of them 
are still doing business at the same old stands and in much the 
same old flay. Except keeping an eye open for a possible in- 
former (when word seems to reach them in some miraculous 
manner), they fear no one. Automobile parties, with their quota 
of the fail sex. alight and are entertained royally. Booths and 
boxes furnish plenty of privacy that permits even girls of the 
district to take part in gay soiress without it being known. There 
is where the danger lies. These places are no better than dance- 
halls — at any rate, they do a dance-hall business on a saloon 
license — and the step from one of them to the mire of Pacific 
street is not hard for an impulsive girl to make. The police 
commissioners, however, and the police, appear indisposed to 
take an active interest in the matter. That an order has been 
passed forbidding this sort of thing seems to have cleared their 
consciences utterly. We would not like to accuse either of these 
venerable bodies of uttering between yawns, "Only a few more 
girls gone to Hell," but if looks that way. If a highball or two 
will waken these gentlemen, why not go out to one of these 
places and get it? We guarantee that if they arrive at the 
right time they will meet with a ruder awakening than they 
looked for. Isn't it about time the authorities in San Fran- 
cisco should enforce laws as well as enact them. 



If there ever was a question upon 
The Tariff Farce. which the American people have 

made themselves clear it is that 
of the tariff. During the canvas that preceded the election of 
President Taft there was no one with a grain of gray matter in 
his cranium who supposed for an instant that a higher tariff 
would be imposed upon the people than that exacted by the 
Dingley measure. Everybody knew and everybody agreed that 
the tariff must be revised, and that the revision must be down- 
ward. 

Congress met. and the House was more than half-inclined to 
share the views of the President and heed the warning of the 
public. The Senate did not coincide in these opinions, and, as a 
result, we have now before us a patch-work measure, which im- 
poses still greater burdens upon us. Tt is undeniably true that 
the Senate does not sil as the voice expressive of the wishes of 
the various legislatures of the federation of States, hut that, at 
the crack of the whip of certain Senators, who have shamelessly 
confessed that they represented not the people but certain inter- 
ests, the whole body imposes its will upon the House, the people 
and the President in a revision which, in its general trend, is up- 
ward and not downward. 

The News Letter has repeatedly called attention to the fact 
that the two legislative bodies were hammering nails into the 
coffin of the Republican party. Tf the measure passes, according 
to the will of the predatory manufacturers, as expressed by Sena- 
tor Payne, the lid may as well be screwed down on the G. 0, P., 
for an infuriated electorate will return other than Republicans 
to power al the next election. There is only one means 
ascendancy now. and that is with a new Republican party, with 
Roosevelt as the standard bearer. FTe mav have to carry out his 
promise and make literally true his "I will come back." 



Unless an unprecedented series of 
Why Goon Timfs. disaster should swoop down upon 

the grain producing districts of the 
nation before the crops are safely housed, the country may be 
said to be on the eve of a period of extraordinary prosperity. The 
year 190ti is on record as producing in wheat, corn. oats, rye 
and barley an aggregate of 1,839,000,000 bushels, but the prom- 
ise of i >r 883,000,000 bushels in excess of that year's 
yield, and 788,000,000 more bushels than was harvest 
year ( L908.) Prices for this year's grain- are prett; • to be 
at figures that will vield satisfying profits to the farmers, which 
in turn will enable him to buy liberally of industria 
and other commodities. 

In addition to this enormous vield of the four principal grains. 



there is no reason to believe that other I i and indirect 

produce will fall short of last year's yield, auch as li\ 
fruits, vegetables and dairy products. 

No estimate is here made of the hay crop, tbe third I 
of farm products as to value, nor of the cotton yield, which 
stands second in point of value, corn always being ;it the bead 
of the list in quantity and value. 

It is upon this promise of the country's yield of farm produc- 
tions that the News Letter predicts a long period of profitable 
activity in all lines of business operations, mechanical pursuits 
and labor employment. But while all these "good things" are 
sure to come, or begin coming almost immediately, the News 
Letter would warn the public that conditions were substantially 
as favorable in 1906 as they are now, but in anticipation of a 
"boom" in everything, the country went wild over real estate 
speculations, which went so far as to include the cutting up of 
farms lying miles from business centers into "town lots" and 
selling them at many times over what the farm could have been 
bought for per acre. And in addition to the "booming" of real 
property, not far from $4,000,000,000 in various kinds of bonds 
and stocks were put upon the speculative markets, most of 
which found its way into the pockets of speculative "lambs" in 
exchange for cash. Desire to "speculate" is a wrong conception 
of the meaning of what is a business enterprise, and so long as 
such desire is cultivated, there will be "hard times" at almost 
regular intervals. 



Doing Politics. 



Mayor Taylor seems never to weary 
of doing politics at the behest of 
Rudolph Spreekels or James D. 
Phelan. The absence of Colonel Kirkpatrick gave the opponents 
of the Colonel a mean advantage and they hastened to take ad- 
vantage thereof, by forcing Mayor Taylor to declare a vacancy 
in the Park Board. So the Colonel was canned. 

The Mayor states that the Colonel overstayed his leave of sixty 
days, and it is presumed that no consent was asked for a con- 
tinuation of absence from tbe commission's sittings. 

We will have to hunt farther than a simple excuse on the part 
of the fuzzy-wuzzy Mayor of San Francisco for the reasons that, 
have deprived a very worthy and honest citizen of honors be- 
stowed upon him by the people. The feeling against Colonel 
Kirkpatrick is only another example of the rule or ruin policy 
of the Spreckels-Phelan outfit. This political combination failed 
to rule the Republican politics of the 1905 convention, and have 
never lost an opportunity since to destroy those who are not 
fully in accord with their views, \lwavs be it remembered that 
Spreekels is aided, abetted and egged on by the Maehiavellan 
Phelan. 

Colonel Kirkpatrick ha« at ill times followed the dictates el' 
his own conscience, and has never shown a willingness to do the 
bidding of persons in preference to public duty. Hence he is not 
a favorite of the present administration. 

As soon as Kirkpatrick had eiven them the chance to whack 
at him, behind his back, by overlooking the extension of his leave 
of absence, the serews were applied by the Mayor and the Colonel 
got his. 

While his political foes in San Francisco were busily en{ 
doing dirty politics, Col. Kirkpatrick was abroad for the Palace 
Hotel Company, and incidentally promoting the welfare and 
happiness of the people of San Francisco. He was studying 
hotel conditions, and at the same time civic conditions in Euro- 
pean capitals. Public parks received his serious considera- 
tion, and the decapitation will surprise and pain him more than 
it will any one else. Colonel Kirkpatrick is one of San Fran- 
cisco's foremost citizens, and it is with regret that the spite work- 
is chronicled. 



Colonel Roosevelt has been "eating 'em alive," with traps, 

according to Washington advice. He is sending back to the 
Smithsonian Institution an able detachment of wild beasts, 
birds and reptiN imens are to be placed in the 

-ual gardens in Washington for the instruction and in- 
ith of the land. But although the lions, tigers 
and other carnivorous beasts will be behind strong bars, it will 
be well for childless married couples, impure food manufacturers 
and undesirable citizens to stay away from the park. The wild- 
est animals may sometimes be trained to obey the slightest whim 
of their master. So might it be with Caesar's. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 31, 1909 



The municipal campaign is open in 
Bitterest Ever Fought, spots, and in a few days the firing 

line will he in action from end to 
end with guns of various calibre and corresponding shot and 
shell. One candidate for District Attorney started his cam- 
paign a few days ago by announcing that "this campaign prom- 
ises to be one of the bitterest ever fought in this city.'' It is 
sale to say that there are other candidates who feel and believe 
as he does, while there are still others who would not think the 
game worth the candle if abuse, billingsgate and oratorical pyro- 
technics were eliminated, but it is to be hoped, at least, that some 
of the candidates will have in mind the dignity of the office to 
which they aspire, and not forget that for three years the city 
has been under a black cloud of evil-doing in official as well as 
in private life. While the smoke of the great conflagration still 
lingered above the ruins, diabolical schemes were concocted by 
certain trusted municipal officers to rob and plunder the city 
in the name of imperative needs and betterments of the waste 
places. All the world knows what depths of official brigandage 
the Supervisors and other sworn servants of the public willingly 
sank to make private gain for themselves. 

In view of these facts, and feeling the humiliation and dis- 
grace of it all, it would seem that every candidate and every 
elector would abhor the introduction of anything into the cam- 
paign that looked or sounded like bitterness or hatred. But, 
as yet. with few exceptions, nothing has developed in the race 
for office that gives hope for a departure from the old -way of 
seeking office for the sake of the office — for the power and profits 
that go with it. Nevertheless, fully two hundred candidates are 
striving for thirty-one public offices, which suggests that "this 
campaign promises to be one of the bitterest ever fought in this 
city," as one candidate puts it. But why bitterness and abuse? 
Will it help San Francisco? 



Fool Game Laws. 



"Of all the humorous literature of 
this country, our game laws offer, 
perhaps, the most amusing in- 
stances." This quotation, from an article in an Eastern maga- 
zine, applies with force to the California game laws as well as 
those of other States. For example, what could be more ridicu- 
lous than the local statute which forbids hunting deer with dogs, 
yet permits running wounded deer with dogs? How is the 
hunter to run the wounded deer with bis dog unless he has the 
dog with him? How is either he or the dog to know whether the 
deer is wounded or not in most cases? What chance lias the 
perplexed game warden to secure a conviction? Either dogs 
should be allowed to run deer at all times, during tin- season, or 
not at all. The present hermaphroditic law is an absurdity. So 
are several other game laws, applied to animals, birds and fish. 
Moreover, the "pen and closed seasons, and other legal specifica- 
tions and restrictions, are changed so frequently thai the aver- 
age citizen, particularly in the country, when- lish and game are 
most plentiful and most sought, becomes confused and does not 
know where he stands from year to year. There is too much 
difference of opinion between sportsmen, game officials and legis- 
lators. There is too much law, perhaps, and too little preser- 
vation of game. 

This is also the open season for tools as well as for deer. Like- 
wise for the unfortunates who happen to come within range of 
the -fool and his gun." Scarcely had the deer season opened 
when the papers were filled with accounts of catastrophes of the 
hunt. The News Letter has long contended and now reiterates 
that there should be some regulation regarding the issuance of 
hunting licenses in respect to the capabilities of the persons who 
receive them. No one who cannot demonstrate familiarity with 
firearms, and a reasonable degree of caution in their use, should 
be permitted to hunt in this State. Let us secure a sane hunt- 
ing season. 



Workmen Should 

Be Protkcted. 



A man was killed (he other day 
while pulling down one of the last 
remaining sections of wall on the 
City Hall. He was buried deep 
under the debris. Two hours later, word reached the Coro- 
ner's office of the occurrence, and two deputies were sent 
down to investigate. They asked all the men at work— those 
who had themselves narrowly escaped death — ami they all pro- 
fessed ignorance of the occurrence. Investigation proved that 
the contractors had given them instructions to "know nothing." 



But the deputies were not satisfied, and pursued their investi- 
gations until they found the body of the man, still partly covered 
with debris. 

They say that in this enlightened age that we have more 
thought for human life; the doctors go to great length even to 
prolong the existence of a miserable suffering creature a few 
hours. There are movements afoot constantly to protect the 
workmen more in their dangers. But there seems to be a class 
of men engaged in the contracting business, not only here, but 
everywhere in the country, who are utterly careless of what ball- 
pens to the men who work for them. They cheat them out of 
their money, hold back on their pay, although they themselves 
have received the funds, let them meet unknown dangers, and 
finally when they are killed, warn the other poor devils under 
penalty of losing their jobs not to tell even the coroner's men 
what happened, it is high time that the contractor was taken 
in hand. 



FiRE-piiooF School 
Houses. 



It is strange that the new City Ar- 
chitect, Loring P. liixford, should 
have ordered, or at least permitted, 
the omission of up-to-date fire-proof 
equipment in the new school-houses to be built under his regime. 
Of the thirty-four schools provided for by recent bond issues, 
nearly hall' are already completed or contracted for under the 
direction of Rixl'ord's predecessor, the late Newton J. Tharp. 
They are all fitted with excellent defense against fire disaster, 
such as metal window sashes, wired-glass windows, fire-proof 
stair-cases and other needs for safety. It is reported that these 
fittings will be omitted from the new schools yet to be built, old- 
fashioned wooden and plain glass windows and doors being sub- 
stituted. This is a most seriously obnoxious form of economy. 
It is economizing at the expense of the safety of the lives of the 
children. 



When women patronize a "beauty doctor" and leave his 

"parlors" with characters a little spotted, they should make no 
IH-- over it. It belongs to the job. Ask Oakland about it. 



"Six feet in his boots!" exclaimed old Mr. Flatiron. 

"Nonsense! Why, they might as well tell me that the man has 
six heads in his hat !" — Tit-Bits. 



Promptness is a characteristic of the Spaulding Carpet 

Cleaning Company. Thoroughness is another, and the housewife 
who entrusts her rugs or carpets to this firm is a walking adver- 
tisement of its efficiency. Every quality that goes to ensure an 
ever-increasing patronage is the practice of this reliable house. 

WEDDING PRESENTS. 
The choicest variety to select from at Marsh's, corner Cali- 
fornia and Polk streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 




CHA&KEILUS6M 
EXCLUSIVE 

HIGH CRAPE CLOTHIERS 

No Branch Stores. No Agents. 



31 



THE FASHION THERMOMETER FOR HIGH-GRADE CLOTHES IS 
LAUNCHED IN NEW YORK CITY. OUR CLOTHES ARE MADE 
THERE, WHICH MAKES US STYLE LEADERS. THE KIND OF 
CLOTHES WE SELL ARE MADE FOR US EXCLUSIVELY AND SOLD 
UNDER OUR LABEL. NO REGRETS WHEN YOU BUY HERE AS WE 
PROTECT YOU ON PRICE. 

GARMENTS THAT — .. ~*7 E UJWJf 

J$nn Jrranciscn. 



LABEL LOOK 



SO DIFFERENT 
AND WEAR 
DIFFERENT. 



While most shops are trying to dispose of "Job Lots," mis- 
takes, left overs, the product of overrated makers, we are un- 
packing here almost every day our new fall and winter fab- 
rics and fashions. The way we've sold out our summer stock 
proves that we know how to select and from whom. We de- 
pend solely upon one thing: that's "Merit." Our clothes are 
made and fit so well that we don't require a mald-to-order 
Department. We have the highest grade men's clothes made. 



Jewelers Building, Poft Street, near Kearny, San Francisco 






.Tti.v 31, 1909 



and California Advertiser 




'tfWNCREr 






• 



President Charles W. Eliot, late of Harvard, having just 

appeared as the prophet of a five-foot library shelf, is now the 
prophet of a new religion. Dr. Eliot, it must be understood, is 
not aligning himself with Zoroaster, Buddha, Mohammed, Brig- 
ham Young or General Booth. He simply stated in a popular 
lecture what he believed to be the trend of modern theological 
thought, and what would be the development of the popular con- 
ception of God. But the curious thing is this — that while Dr. 
Eliot's views are revolutionary in a dogmatic sense, they have 
not created nearly the stir which ruffled the country when it was 
learned that some interesting books had been omitted from the 
five-foot book-shelf. Can it be we are more interested in the 
author of a best-seller than we are in the Author of the Uni- 
verse ? 

Mr. Randell, of Texas, must have known that it would be 

futile when he made a motion in the House of Representatives 
that the Speaker immediately appoint the judiciary committee 
in order that it might consider the question of amending the law 
so as to prohibit Congress and the courts from receiving valu- 
able gifts, employments or compensations from public service 
corporations, trusts and persons engaged in Interstate Commerce 
or having an interest in legislation. That is a terrible thing to 
propose before the honest and able Congress of the United States. 
It carries an insult into every guilty congressional heart. Were 
it passed, the public might infer that some Congressmen were 
culpable. As it was defeated, our inference changes quickly into 
assurance of the charge. 

The Holy Rollers are again in trouble. One of the cult 

is wanted by the police to explain bis peculiar conduct in hypno- 
tising a young girl whom he met at a gathering of the sect, 1 
have seen the Holy Rollers, although not in their violent moods, 
and I have seen persons confined in insane hospitals who ap- 
peared more rational. To be in their atmosphere makes one's 

flesh creep with ghastly repugnance. They are pale, and their 
skin is waxy and drawn sharply over the bones "i the Pace. Their 
eves are glazed with a watery lilin ; their mouths are weak and 
quivering, the lips bloodless. They should be put under police 
surveillance of some mild sort Anything savoring of persecu- 
tion would benefit the sect more than il would curb the eccen- 
tricities of its members. 

1 was speaking to a Judge of the Superior Court the 

other day, twitting him. in fact, on his inconsequence before the 
Appellate and Supreme benches. "Why," 1 said, ■•their slightest 
whim can nullify any judgment which you may pronounce. Sou 

are utterly at their mercy. Reversals ran mm,' upon you from 
all sides, and what retaliation can you mike:'" The judge pon- 
dered humorously lor a moment. "1 guess I ran reverse them 
in more important matters than they can tomb me upon," he 
answered. "I ran divorce any couple in the world which they 
might try to marry for keeps. 1 should say that was going 
in a judicial way." So it seems. 

At last the new crime has been committed. The pirate of 

the airship has tlown his black flag from the inflated brow of 
his dirij ifl and simultaneously has set at naught th 

..I' private property and the laws of gravitation. Admiralty law 
makes any crime committed three miles oil shore a 1 
offense. What will aero-law make of any crime committed three 

ih? It is high time we were getting into 
munication with Mars and establishing an interplanetary 
By the way. the tirst air pirate comes from Fruitvale. Mars 
will be interested to know that. 

Bleriot crossed the English Channel in his airshi] 

metaphorically scattered shot and shell all over England. N'ow 
let England go and do the same thing for Prance. That will 
balance things. 



Bernard Shaw is coming to America to lecture in the 

cause id' the unemployed and in the interest of socialism, 'there, 
you Portola people, have Bernard come and make one of the 
speeches id' welcome for Caspar de Portola. With Mayor Taj lor, 

the serious poet, and Bernard Shaw, the satirical playwright. 

at the dork, the second coming of the Spanish explorer will he a 
literary event of charm and delicacy, 'there is another point 
about the Portola proposition which, il srems, the Ocean Shore 
Railroad has overlooked. Although it is scarcely believable, if 
is nevertheless true that Caspar de Portola traveled over the 
route of the Ocean Shore Railroad even before J. Downey Har- 
vey did. I know that .Downey Harvey is recognized far and 
wide as the discoverer of Half Moon Hay, from the land side, 
and all that narrow rim of valley between the San Mateo bilks 
and the Pacific. But even the magnate himself would have 
reluctantly to admit that Portola beat him to it, and discovered 
San Francisco bay from the top of the peaks behind Granada 
before Harvey had thought of running a railroad down that 
way. 

A Nevada Judge, sitting in the divorce suit of Mrs. 

Helen B. Tyler, daughter of Brigadier-General Lloyd M. Brett, 
U. S. A., refused to grant the decree because Mrs. Tyler left 
her legal home in Reno to take a little trip lo Paris. This is. 
probably the first time on record that a trip to Paris spoiled a 
divorce — it frequently exhilarates the action. But the ruling 
of Judge Piker of Reno is noteworthy. He should be granted 
a medal by the Nevada promotion committee. For his ruling 
that prospective divorcees must reside continuously in the Sage- 
brush State while they are in training for the divorce decree 
will do more than anything else — unless it be the mines of 
Tonopah, Goldfield, et al. — to keep Nevada's population up to 
normal with California so near at band. 

A renowned ladies' magazine gives momentous advice in 

answer to the query: "How can dandelions be removed from a 
lawn?" The pert reply is: "Treat them by dripping turpentine 
on the leaves from a medicine dropper." 'that method is almost 
as vile a device as the one used by Hamlet's uncle in making 
away with the noble King of Denmark. Had the lady whose 
lawn is infested with dandelions had asked us how she might rid 
herself of the pest, we would have sabJ : "Whisper in their ears, 
kindly and firmly, the advice that if they do not depart you will 
shake your fist in their faces. Then they'll scamper." 

Mark Twain is to pilot the boat on which President Taft 

will cruise clown the Mississippi river from St. Louis. Mark 
is unquestionably an able pilot. But the world will hope thai 
the young lady, to whom Mark gave the house and lot and then 
asked that bis joke be rejected, will not sow a crop of torpedoes 
along the river bottom. Il might spoil our Portola show. 




uimiw/> 




Large reductions on Summer 
Apparel in every Department. 
Garments which are specially 
adapted for vacation and out- 
ing wear. 

GRANT AVENUE AND GEARY ST. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 31, 1909 




E#JKER0N 




When you walk down Market street in San Francisco it seem? 
to be a city fair of face and open in character, but ever and anon 
there comes to light some remarkable story of hypnotic power, 
disguises, threats and intimidations practiced right under our 
noses as we go down the broad highway in the broad daylight. 

A young girl has recently sought the aid of the police to have 
them remove from her the spell of a hypnotistf a Holy Roller, 
forsooth, who was a man of many disguises and lived so many 
lives in one that it makes one envious to think of how much more 
he got out of life than the rest of us. This girl went away 
from home with the Holy Roller, allowed herself to be locked 
in a room by him, and, although he permitted her to go out 
alone for her meals, the power of his personality was so great 
over her that she came back every time. She says she tried 
again and again to take street ears going in the opposite direc- 
tion, or make a mad rush for the ferry, but every time her feet 
would turn to lead and she would turn back." He was a man who 
came into a room disguised as an old farmer, "but in a minute 
would turn around a dashing young chap with curly hair and 
a mustache. 

It reads like melodrama. That is what it is. This city has 
a natural turn that way. But think of the richness of that fel- 
low's life? What can ordinary persons of common mind and 
respectable leanings understand of the mental pleasures he has 
from his kaleidoscopic existence? It would not be well to have 
too many like him, and he and his kind are a menace, but you 
cannot help envying him the joy of the romantic existence he 
leads. This girl was but an incident in his career, hardly as 
much as a Marguerite to this Faust, whose familiar spirit is the 
Mephistopheles hypnotism. " 

Did you ever notice how the spiritualists and fortune-telling 

fakers flourish here? Do you remember the incident of the big 

black who styled himself the Tiger Maharma? The Tiger went 

to jail, it is true, but for the most part they get away with it and 

have a full life in their evil way. 

* * * 

The vandal souvenir hunters are after the Gjoa. There is 
just one spot in the staunch oak hull of this famous ship which 
yields to their puny efforts, but they are attacking this honorable 
scar. In some heroic struggle with the crushing ice-floes of the 
Arctic, Captain Amundsen and his crew narrowly missed going 
to the bottom when an iceberg toppled sharply over, sending the 
cold brine splashing over the bow of the Gjoa, but only touching 
it with its sharp pinnacle as it plunged 
into the awful cold of the polar sea. That 
pinnacle caught the forefoot of the Gjoa 
and tore away a section of LI clear down 
to the hull. The stout iron bands that 
held it were of no avail, and came away 
as if they were tissue paper under the 
smashing blow from the thin point of 
ice. The part missing is only about a 
foot' long, and on either side the ragged 
splinters of oak stick out. At these the 
nir hunters tag and are rewarded for 
their miserable efforts with a few match- 
sized splinters. 

The Gjoa has had an honorable career 
fighting the mighty seas of the German 
Ocean and doing what no other ship has 
ever done in making the Northwest Pas- 
sage. She has always been engaged in a 
traffic that required a strong ship and 
strong men to work. Will it not be a pity 
if -the people of San Francisco think no 
more of the honor that has been conferred 
upon them by the gift of the Gjoa from 
its Norwegian citizens than to hack- 



names in the noble oak and whittle at the beams for souvenirs? 
There is that in human nature which urges us on to make our 
mark on time so that we will not be entirely forgotten when gone, 
but who would care to see his name reviled because he was so 

petty as to do an indignity to a noble ship? 

* * » 

Judge Dunne, who does not care what he says, if he wants to 
say it, remarked about the handwriting experts the other day 
that theirs was the most unreliable testimony. He said it during 
the course of a finely chiseled and polished oration that Sam 
Shortridge was delivering over the subject of a motion for a 
new trial for the young chap Wilson, who was convicted of mur- 
dering Harry Boas by sending him poison through the mails. 

When Wilson was first tried, he did not have the good lawyers 
he has now, and if it had not been for the efforts of a newspaper 
reporter who kept his case in mind and decided during the 
course of the trial that he was not having a fair chance, he would 
now be serving his term. But, instead, Judge Dunne is well on 
the way towards a decision to give him a new trial, and mainly 
through his conviction that the handwriting experts who showed 
by shadings and hooks and twists of letters that Wilson wrote the 
"poison letter" to his employer Boas, were doing a whole lot 
of guessing. For here comes Wilson, now that he has money to 
fight with, and produces a handwriting expert who has taken 
part in some of the most famous law suits in California, who de- 
clares that Wilson wrote none of the letters, and proves his con- 
tention by shadings, hooks and twists of letters, just like the 
other experts. 

The result of this is liable to be that, if Wilson is granted a 
new trial, the handwriting evidence will all be knocked to smash, 
and the jury will have to convict on a weaker case if at all. 
Whether Wilson is guilty or not is another matter, but now 
that he has the money to hire the experts, he is getting a much 
more careful hearing of his case. 

* * * 

A new kind of fraud has been reported. It is a fraud upon 
both the telephone company and the legitimate renters of tele- 
phones. The fraud consists in giving a wrong number when call- 
ing up a trans-bay or long-distance number. For example, when 
the out of town number is called, the operator asks what the 
caller's number is. The dishonest caller will give a false num- 
ber, to which the switch is charged, thus saving a few cents on 
his or her (it is usually a "her") telephone account. This is a 
simple case of petty larceny, and any one detected in it deserves 
a drastic punishment. More than one honest subscriber has 
been astonished to find a long-distance switch, which he never 
used, charged to his account because of this contemptible prac- 
tice. 

* * * 

Claire G. Lane, well known as a member of the Press Club 
and as one of the energetic younger newspapermen of the city, 
has left the game under circumstances, the financial advantages 
of which are unusual. He has become press agent for the stom- 
ach, at a salary greater than that which city editors are receiv- 
ing. A maker of indigestion medicines, who recently visited 



THE BEAUTY of WOOLENS 

and Flannels lies in their Soft- 
--*~-v ness and Fluffiness, and noth- 

ing Washable demands such 
Careful handling in the Wash. 
Avoid the Rubbing of Soap 
and Washboard that Mats 
e Fibres and makes them 
tard and Shrunken before 
eir time. Those who care 
lost for Clean ■*— Soft "■ 
Jnshrunken Woolens and 
(I i lannels are Particular to Use 
PEARL1NE according to 
II directions. 



H"Wash \ 
me pearl 

Direclions for Washing Wnn « U 



n lukewarm ! 
arm Water, 
n warm tem- 




anrl Flannels 



July 31, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



the city, ran out of press agents while here, and Lane was en- 
gaged to continue the work, and he did it in such a satisfactory 
way that now he is to go about the country writing alluring ads 
to be read by those who are not eupeptic. His friends hope that 
a constant application to the work will not effect the young press 
agent so seriously that he will have to lake some of his own 
medicine. 

* * * 

From present indications, the Golden liule Order of the 
World, founded in Berkeley, will grow into a national movement. 
The Golden Eule Order of the World is a non-sectarian fellow- 
ship, having adopted as its basis the Golden Rule, which is striv- 
ing for a closer affiliation of all classes and creeds. The objects 
are as follows : To enlist a vast army of earnest, fearless, con- 
scientious men, women and children in a crusade to place on 
the highest moral grounds their relations in business, social, 
political and domestic life. 

To encourage young men to live clean, manly, virtuous lives, 
and control their angry and lustful passions, abstaining from 
impure thoughts and unlawful habits. 

To lend a helping hand to those who are "down and out" by 
securing them employment. 

To encourage the unfortunate, friendless boys and men in the 
reform schools and penitentiaries to lead a Golden Rule life by 
organizing Golden Rule Clubs among them. 

The large and ever increasing number of crimes, suicides, 
failures, divorces and cases of insanity will decrease in number 
as the Golden Rule Order of the World increases in power, for 
when men are convinced of the untold good to be derived from 
doing "unto others as they would have others do unto them," 
they will have no desire to do wrong. 

* * * 

0, Anna Held, can we ever believe you? You are a fetching 
girl, though terribly naughty, 1 am told by. those who have seen 
you act; but worse of all, you surround yourself with the most 
fantastic press agents in the world. First you rose from adver- 
sity and the chorus on the tidal wave of a phantom milk bath. 
Every morning, we were told, you plunged into a tub of certified 
milk, such as our babies drink, and that made you healthy, 
wealthy (undoubtedly) and wise (we hope.) Later, your press 
agent confessed to the deception and was granted immunity. 
Now you have another press agent who tells us that you are to 
wear a diamond dress when you make your farewell fib — or was 
it farewell disappearance. We have a ((milling story of how you 
went around the house with a magnet, gathering all your scat- 
tered diamonds and turned them over lo the dress-maker in a 
wash-boiler. The dressmaker is to place them on a gown which 
you will wear to dazzle us by. It is fortunate"! Anna, that you are 
in New York. Distance saves us from the fate of being dazzled 
— and of being credulous. 

* * * 

We used to be steeped with the idea of (lie inefficient credulity 
of the marines. That view referred only i<> the privates in the 
service, We were not familiar with the officers of the bode save 
once in a while, when there would lie a war with Spain or with 
the Chinese Boxers, and then we would learn that the Marine 
Corps, officers and men lithful anil brave body of ii. 

But now, from Annapolis, we are learning of another aspect 
of the supernumerary sea-fighters. The ton into the 

death of LieutenH it James V Sutton shows that on occasions 
the marine officers can be wild and riotous, 1 believe the trou- 
ble lies in Hi oiform which the offi i wear. 
The gaudy piece of lackey's livery with which the regulations 
clothe the marine officer is so violently bizarre that, while it 
should not be said that no _ man would wear it, 
il can rigidly he inferred that no man can wear it and retain all 
his Belf-respeci during the ordeal. 



-Japan is becoming anxious to form a new convention with 



the Anglo-Americans, and also with France, to more fully 
tine die trade relations between them, especially as to tl 
door in Manchuria, and in China, later on. Japan prop 

ing the WY-: have an equal chance iu the 
Far I 



Try Murine Eye Remedy 
For Red. Weak. Wenry, Watery Eyes. Granulated Eyelids and Pink 
Eye? Murine Doesn't Smart. Soothes Eye rain. Compounded by Ex- 
perienced Fh< utalns no Injurious or Prohibited Drus?. Try 
Murine for Your Eye Troubles. Tou Will Like Murine. Try It In Baby's 
Eyes for Scaly Eyelids. AU Druggists Sell Murine at 60c. 




New York \^E4s£///JjC£/f/s&' Paris 

//*<■ u" do a art o 
New Location 139-143 Geary Street, between Grant Ave. and Stockton 



Phenomenal Sale of Waists 
at $4.95— $6.95 

Embroidered Chiffon, Lace Net, Applique 
Lingerie, Messaline. in black and all 
colors, at one-half and less than one-half 
their regular value. 



Announcement 



The Tozer Co. 



beg to announce that they 
are now permanently loca- 
ted at 228 Grant Ave. Next to 
White House. Second floor. 



Fine Wall Papers, Draperies, and Interior 
Decorating 

Telephone Douglas 1869 



Surprise Suction Sweeper 

Patented Feb. 4. 1908 

Price $12.50. Operated by hand. Large sale East No exertion. No 
fatigue. Can be operated by a child. Is portable. Weighs only 5 
Does the work of Electric Sweeper at no cost for operation. By express 
prepaid. Just introduced West. Agents wanted in Washington, Oregon, 
California, Montana. Idaho, Utah. Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico. Colo- 
rado. Wyoming. Send for Advertising Matter. 



Pacific Utilities Company 

Monadnock Building. San Francisco 

Controlling Exclusive Rights for Above Mentioned 
States and Territories. 



Branch Office. 542 So. Spring 
Street. Los Angeles. Cal. 




Dr. Byron W. Haines 

Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone, Douglas 43CO 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 31, 1909 



£>att iFrannato Hompn Ht|n pag d>ntf 



By Harrtet Watson Capwell. 



The athletic girl is the common or garden variety of girl in 
California. Almost every girj thai I have seen is potentially 
able to swing a goll' stick or flirt with a tennis racket. She 
may not go in for the athletic stunts at the country clubSj pre- 
ferring to sort and choose and label the men about, but she could 
pose any day for Athletica. Flowers and fruits and peaches of 
girls certainly grow larger in California than elsewhere. Every- 
where the athletic sel is slit up the side like a directoire skirt, 
and those who go in for one thing or another are partitioned off. 
And everywhere but in California you can recognize at a glance 
the women who go in for outdoor stunts. But here almost v\rry 
one looks the type, and you are apt to pick oul as a golf cham- 
pion a girl who thinks that outdoor exercise is stupid and that 
bridge beats everything ;> up and 1 to play. Round and linn of 
arm. and swinging id' hip, is the California girl — even when she 
belongs to the hammock guild, in no city thai I know of do 
the women look athletic more and talk it less. 

The other day 1 heard a young woman discussing the servant 
question with all the erudite perception of one who has taken 
the whole Bubject of Domestic Science, as offered in a modern 
college, and used il for a door mat. Here was a girl with an arm 
that Looked as though it had been made to swing a golf stick — 
instead of pushing a button for the solution to the servant ques- 
tion. Imagine my surprise when my friend told mi' thai the 
young woman was Hiss Alice Hager, one of the champion golf 
players in society. Oh, blessed he the hug that bites r.ol deeply! 
Never in the East have L known a golf "champ" who could talk 
about anything hut the game, or wiio Could look upon life as 
anything hut a trophy cup upon which to engrave one's name. 
Yet here was a girl who could keep one eye on a trophy and the 
other on all the lesser things like art, science, literature, music 
and the servant question. A lew days later I saw Miss Hager 
put up a ripping game oul at the golf club, and afterwards she 
sat on the veranda with her opponents and they talked about 
the new country houses thai people are building. 

The sanity of the golf players out here is clear in a golf alien- 
ist. A New York golfist wouid undoubtedly declare that the 
San Francisco variety is insane because if is nol attacked by 
virulent golfitis. It certainly is refreshing to find thai the 
women oul here who go in for goll' do not become so saturated 
with the subjeel that their friends have to Hear a rain coat. 1 
had the pleasure of meeting .Miss Florence [ves, Mrs. Henry 
Crocker's sister, and I actually il ghl that she was a settle- 
ment worker. The conversation centered about the poor dis- 
tricts of the city, and she seemed to know so much about them 
and the various philanthropic efforts lo ameliorate Men' suffer- 
ings thai 1 decided she belonged to I he class of voting women 
who. along wilh the pleasure.- of life, make charily their business. 
I doubl do! that Mi-- [ves due- do her share of thai sort of thing, 

but oul al the golf club 1 discovered that she. loo. is a golf 
champion and devotes mosl of her spare time lo the game. ' 

Three afternoons have I journeyed oul lo the golf links with 
an Eastern enthusiast, and while he has tried to wipe California 
oil' the score, I have sniffed the strong salt breezes thai rowdy 
over the links, and watched the players when the game is over 
enjoy the hospitality of the club house. My Eastern enthusiast 
agree- with me that the girls oui here are charming. II.' like- 
wise has noticed that the young women who go in for golf do 
not become hound hand and fool and tongue lo it. lie re- 
pealed to me a very droll story which son,,'. gi r ] had told him 
out on the links, and golf did not form the background id' the 
story, nor did one have to know all the plaid argot of the game 
to get the point. He has several limes commented on com- 
plexions as they grow on California golf links, but he has like- 
wise asserted in a whisper that the women golfists out here ilo 
not play in the class of the Eastern society champions. Far he 
it for me to make him eat his words — rise in your wrath, you 
lady champions, if you feel yen have been maligned, ami 'tap 
htm three consecutive times on the wrist with a golf slick. 1 
know a caddy by his grin ami his itching palm, hut the upper- 
euls and strokes and strike.- of a golf stick are as the telegraph 
code to me. 



I should judge, however, by all the signs and symbols of the 
athletic microbe thai the game as played by society women out 
here is not taken too seriously, and I, for one, congratulate you, 
oh wise young women! Life should not he laid out like a golf 
links and ruled by a golf stick', yel too often the English ami 

even the Eastern enthusiast imagines that existence is hounded 

by the links, 'there are a dozen women out at the club here, who 
put up a good game, says my Eastern "crank." but he declares 
thai bo far he has nol met the peer of the crack women players 
of the various clubs around New York. Mrs. Walter Martin 
and Beveral Other society players are away just now, so be has 
possibly not had a fair chance to judge. I am told that Mrs. 
Martin puts up a corking good game, hut is never at "concert 
pitch" in her playing because she does not practice strenuously. 
Possibly it is because golf doe- not carry them oil' their feet 

thai the women out at the golf club seem a trifle unsportsman- 
like — dilletante in their playing and dilly-dally-tante in their 
code. For example. I heard thai a certain young matron never 
plays out there now because no one in her particular set is 

golfing. She does not criticise the impeccable social standing 
of the other members, hut they do not happen to stand just 
where she Anrs. and so she does not play, caring more for the 
class distinction of her right little, tight little set than the game 
itself. I was (old a slorv about a Burlingame young matron 
who, at Del Mont' 1 . i\vrw as a partner a handsome woman who 
had just arrived at matrimony via a sensational divorce, and 
the Burlingame matfon simply tore up her card and refused 

lo eiiler the contest. There may be a stout peg on which lo bane 
her defense, hut when a yonng woman will not play golf wilh 
any hut her own intimate friend, then indeed is she unsports- 
manlike. And the men insist that very few of the women really 
are "-ports" at the game. 



William English Walling, husband of the notorious 

Strunsky woman, and Russian socialist, has found a French 
affinity, hut strunsky cares nothing for a little matter like that. 

she w noi so slow hersel 1. 



The San Francisco woman is a woman of taste, and she 

knows the real thing in style when she sees it. Paris is in her 
eye, for Paris is the model of fashions feminine. "The Bonnet 
Shop," importers of Parisian millinery, at 121 Geary street, em- 
bodies in all its displays all that is "chic" in the very latest 
Paris modes in headgear for women. The hats are strictly tail- 
ored and are snappy and smart in design and color. 



WEDDING PRESENTS. 
The choicest variety to select from at Marsh's, corner Cali- 
fornia and Polk streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



RHINE & MOSELLE 




WINES 








FROM 






ED. 


SAARBACH & 

MAYENCE, GERMANY 


CO. 




Used in all 


the BesT; Hotels, 


Cafes 


, Etc. 


Charles 


Meinecke 


& 


Co. 


Agents Pacific Coasl. 


San Francisco 



July 31. 1909 



and California Advertiser 




PLEAME'ftlil) 




lib afyj* a~J ^^m^-s-JX^l 

By Barnett Franklin. 

"Polly of the Circus," at the Van Ness, is Simple and Touching. 

"Heart interest." Tis a vague, intangible thing, this "heart 
interest." The dramatist who seeks tn portray the common 
things and the eommon people of life is ever after it. The 
good playgoers who detest Ibsen, and wouldn't give a snap or 
three of their fingers for the whole stock of Maeterlinck produc- 
tions, fairly revel in it. Wherefore the man who can properly 
grasp the ways and means of interjecting the correct doses of 
."heart-interest" into his drama is going to be a favorite play- 
wright with the box-office end of the theatre. He is the much- 
wanted individual in the theatrical world from a shrewd mana- 
gerial viewpoint. His goods are in demand. 

It is not often, however, that the writer of the play with 
"heart-interest" makes good with the tall-brows. The individ- 
uals with the ponderous foreheads, who just dote on "problems" 
and psychological somethings-or-other in their theatrical bills- 
of-fare, are prone to smile smugly at the merest suggestion of 
"heart-interest" in their footligfit 'food. "Heart-interest" is not 
for the elect, they will patronizingly have you understand. 

I, too, many times and oft, have scoffed at a dishing-un of 
"heart-interest" in the theatre. I resented the playwright's 
appeal to the superficial sentiments of his audience. I have 
thought and written many bitter words against the obvious 
trickeries of the commercialists of the drama, and felt like a 
very superior sort of personage, doncherknow. Last Sunday 
night marked my falling from grace. Miss Margaret Mayo was 
the playwright who was most influential in toppling me off my 






■> vlii 

1 1 &L 


^v m 




1 ■'"" AiVfi 







Hiss Harriet Worthington, leading woman of the American 
Theatre stock company. 

pedestal; Miss Ida St. Leon, who is the "Polly" of the circus, 
was an admirable second to the lady of the quill; and Mr. Fred- 
eric Thompson's arts as producer completed the good work. 

Miss Mayo's "Polly of the Circus" is essentially a play of 
"heart-interest' 1 Mr. Ralph Pincus. the genial press agent of 
the Van NesB 3 made meutiou of that horrible fact to me dining 
the first intermission. I diplomatically acknowledged the point 
without a smile, and went back to my seat prepared to he prop- 
erly bored with two more acts surfeited with that detestable dra- 



Mary Marble, the famous musical comedy star, who will begin 
an engagement this Sunday matinee at the Orpheum. 




■ AJ YOU will buy a piano 
B~ of us, of any make, we 

I I will agree to exchange 
I I it for a Steinway at any 
I I time within three years, 
I a allowing you on the 

■ 9 Steinway every dollar 
you have paid upon the 

other instrument. 

You'll ultimately want a 
Steinway, so you better get 
your temporary piano where 
you won't lose anything on it 
when you get ready to trade 
; it in for a Steinway. 

Sherman Biay& Co. 

STEINWAY AND OTHER PIANOS 

Victor Talking Machines 

Kearny and Sutter Streets, S. F. 

Clay, at 14th St., Oakland, Cal. 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 31, 190J) 



matic ingredient. That, however, 1 was far from being bored, 
and that in addition I was regaled with two more acts of simple, 
effective, interesting theatrical entertainment, I am happy to 
admit. So, too, was the Lady Who Accompanies Me to the Play. 
And she is no greater lover of the pastoral drammer than my 
humble self. 

Say, if you will, that "Polly of the Circus" has nothing of 
depth in its makeup, that it abounds with lines calculated to 
catch the applause of the unwary, that it is steeped in melodrama 
and is overstocked with theatrical devices and trickeries, the fact 
remains that it gets at the human part of you. The secret is. 
that "Polly of the Circus," despite its many manifest artificiali- 
ties, is a very human play. I defy the stoniest of you to sit it 
through without at least a dozen catchings at the throat or a 




Frank- Bacon, the well-known comedian, who appears this 
Monday night at the Alcazm Theatre in "Charley's Aunt." 

half-dozen thrills being registered in your spinal column. And 
the back-bone is often the best dramatic critic. 

The simple story of the little circus rider who, thrown from 
her horse in the ring, seriously injured, and taken to the minis- 
ter's house for well-keeping, comes in the after-days to gain an 
understanding of a life previously foreign to her, rings true. 
You pour out your sympathy to this tinseled maid cradled in the 
sawdust ring, and yon follow her varying fortunes with the ten- 
derness and solicitude that the playwright — craftily and obvi- 
ously though it may be — has prognosticated you will. Polly 
ii- your sympathy, and you are happy in her development and 
growth; her career has something of the glamour of the circus 
itself; you do not resent the "happy ending." "Polly of the 
Circus," with all its crudities, is a play that grips. 

Mr. Thompson's production i< a very adequate one, and the 
actors are capable at least, if nol o'er brilliant. The note of 
novelty is struck in depicting the circus life with its acrobats 
and horses and jugglers, and the tents and gloriously decorated 
parade wagons. I almost longed for a glass of pink lemonade to 
complete the illusion. 

"Polly" of the circus is Miss [da St. I. eon, a mere slip of a 
maid of seventeen years, and formerly an equestrienne of the 
New York Hippodrome. She is a real "Polly of the Circus" in 
truth, so here is a touch of gigantic realism. Polly is, in addi- 
tion, a clever little actress with much charm and a considerable 
naive quality. She carries the burden of the play bravely, and 
-IMS a fine promise of things to come. 

Earl Ryder is the minister into whose house Polly is brought 
when injured, and who comes to love her and wean her from her 
old life. Mr. Ryder is a capable actor in many ways, albeit 
very stagey. Kate Jepson is an excellent cullud pusson, and 
Charles Lamb contributes a well-drawn bit as the eanvasman 



of the circus. Some of the other characters are overplayed, but 
the ensemble generally is effective. 

"Polly of the Circus" is a play of "heart-interest"' you will 

like, there's not a doubt on't. 

* * * 

The New Light Opera Season at the Princess. 

Our friends Therry, Gravina, Arcangeli, and the rest of the 
operatic warblers of the International Company, are now on 
their way, and the Ellis street theatre is once more being given 
over to the lighter musical entertainments. "The Belle of New 
York." a very old friend, is officiating as the starter of the sea- 
son, and. well as we know the Belle, she is a very welcome visitor 
if she is presented in anything approaching worth-while shape. 
The plot of this musical comedy is still funny, with all its fool- 
ishness, and the music appears just as tuneful. In other words. 
"The Belle of New York" wears well. 

To the production end at the Princess all praise is due for the 
excellence of the presentation generally. Mr. Charles Sinclair 
proves himself a capable man-behind-the-scenes, :m<\ there is a 
line concerted spirit evidenced throughout. The scenery is good, 
the dancing is up to the proper scratch, ami the chorus swishes 
its skirts devilishly and sings happily. Jack Paynes at the baton 
knows his business, and the melodic part of the production does 
nol suffer. 

Some of the principals are well known to us for past achieve- 
ments. There is our old friend. Arthur Cunningham, of the 
big baritone and the cheerful smile, to clasp figurative hands 
with us across the footlights, for instance. Arthur is a bit 
cheerful for the playing of a mixed-ale pugilist, but it is good 
lo see him, although there is not much opportunity for his war- 
bling in the style both he and we like. Sidney de Grey has been 
hi ire with other companies, and is acceptable in the part of 
rchabod Bronson of Cohoes. Budd Ross seems to appeal to his 
audience with his low comedy as Kenneth Mugg, low comedian, 
and Edwin Emery and Frank Veck play two other comedy parts 
with near-success. 

There is a little maid with the uneuphonious title of Olga 
Stech, who is no bigger than a mushroom, but who is decidedly 
head and shoulders above the others of the women-folk in the 
company. Olga is Pifi. the Parisienne, and she is a dainty piece 
of femininity with a good voice. Marta Golden, who is the 
Cora Angelique, and Oetavia Broskle, who has the Edna May- 
role, are far from being as happy as Miss Olga. This is a first 
production, however, so it behooves us to be charitable. 

* * * 

Charles Dow Clark Makes a Big Hit at the Valencia. 

This is Charles Dow Clark's week at the Valencia Theatre. 
That Mr. Clark is as versatile a stock comedian as has appeared 
locally T have long known, and in "At the White Horse Tavern." 
he i- giving nightly fresh evidences of his versatility. The bril- 
liant old German farce comedy is funny enough because of its 
intrinsic worth when played in the most perfunctory fashion. 
hut when the illuminating art of Mr. Clark is brought into the 
case, it is as fine a piece of footlight entertainment as one would 
wish to find in a seven days' walk. 

William Giesicke, of Berlin, traveling under protest, is in Mr. 
Clark's hands as admirable a farcical personage as it is ever 
your good fortune and mine to meet in a stock production. His 
humor makes for infection : I defy your risibilities to withstand 
him. Clark makes for a deckle-edged, blue-ribbon, all-wool-and- 
a-yard-wide joy- f est. Paul McAllister. Robert Homans, Grace 
Travers and several of the others do good work in their respec- 
tive roles, but Clark this week is capturing first honors as well 
as second, third, and fourth. 

More than a word of praise must, however, be reserved for the 
clever character bit of Edward Clisbee as the old professor, a 
tender, sympathetic characterization, well-conceived and por- 
trayed. The excellent stage generalship of George Osbourne, 
in his initial production at this theatre, is everywhere evidenced, 
and, altogether, in addition to gaining fresh laurels for Mr. 
Clark, "At the White Horse Tavern" may be set down as a won- 
derfullv successful comedv production. 

* * » 

"The Girl mul the Judge" Excellent Entertainment at the 
A Icazar. 
Mr. Clyde Pit;ch is rarely so cleverly entertaining as in his 
play which the Alcazar has been presenting for the week. In 
"The Oirl and the Judge" he is both clever and entertaining. 
His tale of the kleptomanic whose husband is driven to drink and 






.Tri.v 81, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



11 



Le Maire and an adequate supporting company. Nexl week will 
ie lasl of Griff, the London juggling jesting Johnnie; Wal- 
ter Sehrode and Lizzie Mulvey in "A Theatrical Agency ;" Ber- 
ber! and Wijling, and of San Watson's Farmyard Circus. 

* * * 

Elephants will be the new feature at the New Chutes begin- 
ning this Sunday afternoon. Then 1 will be dozens of other at- 
tractions to please the eye and ear, but the big, lumbering fellows 
that one so seldom sees outside the tent shows, will be the head- 
liners. The troupe, which will open an engagemenl tit the Fill- 
more street, resort Sunday is known in the circus world as Glass- 
cock's trained elephants. For two seasons Eingling Brothers 
featured them as the "Three Guardsmen" because of the martial 
maneuvres which they perform. The act will be shown from an 
open-air platform. Desperado, the sensational diver who has 
claimed much attention since the opening of the New Chutes. 
and who was to have closed his engagement to-night, will give 
two more exhibitions to-morrow. Florence Spray and Demon 
will contribute high dives and fiery rides down the chutes, arid 
the Royal Banda Roma will give concerts afternoon and night. 



New Alcazar Theatre 



whose daughter therein is almosl cheated of her happiness, it ah 

solutely Fitchian. It is lighi and airy where n 1 be, and il is 

touched with just the righi proportion of sentimeni in the un- 
folding of the story. It is in the altogether a daintily woven 
piece of theatrical diversion. 

As usual, the Alcazar's production is up to the high-water 
mark. Scenery and coslumerv are of the top-notch kind, and 
the acting is of the Alcazar standard. Louise Brownell Is ■ par- 
ticular good as Mrs. Brown, and she heroically hides her pul- 
chritude under a forbidding veneer. She is the hit of the show. 
Bessie Barriscale does good work as the heroine; Thurlow Ber- 
gen, as the Judge, though unconvincing in the lighter moments, 
is generally efficient. Christie Mai-Lean does some out of the 
ordinary work as in a character role. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
'T'ollv of the Circus" is proving a complete success at the 
Wan Ness Theatre, and the production will be continued for one 
more week. The final performance will be given on Sunday 
evening, August 8th. "Polly of the Circus" is reviewed in an- 
other column. 

* * * 

The last performances of "At the White Horse Tavern" will 
take place at the Valencia Theatre this Sunday afternoon and 
evening, and on Monday night "All the Comforts of Home" will 
be accorded a revival. An intercepted note leads directly into 
the story of the comedy, by William Gillette, and the mere fact 
that it is by this prolific author, is evidence that the complications 
which arise from the initial situation are logical, coherent and 
funny. 

"The Private Secretary," still another Gillette success, will 
follow "All the Comforts of Home" tit the Valencia. 

* * * ■ 

Next week will witness the tenth annual visit of "Charley's 
Aunt" to the Alcazar. Belasco & Mayer induced Frank Bacon 
to cancel one of his vaudeville engagements to re-appear under 
their direction. They are paving him an extraordinarily large 
salary for his week's work, but arc confident he will draw more 
than enough money to compensate them for the additional out- 
lay. Mr. Bacon will be supported by the entire Alcazar corps of 
players, most of whom have before appeared in "Charley's 
Aunt." Since its first production, about thirty years ago, scores 

of its ilk have come anil gone, while it has never waned in popu- 
larity. Bach succeeding generation gives it new clientage. 

* * * 

"The Belle of New York" will have its lasl productions at the 
Princess Saturday and Sunday nights. Matinees will be given 
on those days. The musical comedy season will continue nexl 
Monday evening with "Florodor.i." which will be revived for 
one week only. The following east is expected to insure successi 
Silas W. Gilfain, Arthur Cunningham ; Frank Usercoed, Robert 
Wilson : Leandro, Edwin T. Emery; Captain Arthur Donegal, 
Percy Bronson; Anthony Tweerllepnnch, Budd Ross; Dolores, 
Octavia Broski : Angela Gilfain, Olga Stech; Lady Holywood, 
Marts Golden. The famous Sextette will be represented. 

» » * 

•\\l the Sound of 'Paps." .., sensational military drama, 
adapted from the German by I 

of the American Theatre, v\ ; !l : ring of Manager Uje 
S. Cohen's stock company of iil.i' nning to-mi 
noon. All of the American's favorites will appear in "At the 
Sound of Taps." and as it is a production of sumptuous propor- 
tions, an augmented easi will assist Herschel Mayal, Miss Har- ; — — 

riel Worthington, .Tames Corrigan, Miss Lillian Elliott, Gerald Valencia TrieOtre 
Hareourl. Miss Paulene. William T>. AbTams, G. B. Baldwin. 
Thurlow White and others. 



Corner Sutler and Steiner Streets 
Phone West 1400 
Belasco & Mayer, Owners and Managers. Absolutely Class \ Bl.lt- 
Monday evening, August 2d. and throughout the week, the old 
McaZar favorite, FRANK BACON, in 

CHARLEY'S AUNT, 

The champion laugh-winner. 

Prices — Night, 25c. to $1. Matinees. 25c. to 50c. 

Matinee Saturday and Sunday. 

j\ "Wl 0W) OCi W '1 ^h Off 1~V* MarketSt. near Seventh. Phone Market 381 
JlL llliXjl V\j\X/IV J. IliUll/Vl Xj The playhouse of comfort and safely 

One week, commencing Sunday matinee, August 1st. AMERICAN 
STOCK COMPANY, in the famous German military drama, 

AT THE SOUND OF TAPS. 

Special summer prices — Evenings, 25c, 5t>e., and 75c. Matinees, 
25c. and 50c. 

New Orpheum g&s&Krk **.». 

Safes! and Mosl Magnificent Theatre in America. 

Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

ARTISTIC VAUDEVILLE. 
SAM CHIP and MARY MARBLE In The Deft Dialogue with Ditties 
Designated "IN OLD EDAM;" six AMERICAN DANCERS; MAT- 
THEWS and ASHLEY; FRANK .1. CONROY; GEORGE LE 
MAIRE CO.; SCHRODE and MULVET; GRIFF; HERBERT and 

WILLING; NEW ORPHE1 U MOTION PICTURES. Last u k, 

tremendous hit of SAM WATSON'S FARM1 VRD CIRCUS. 
Evening prices— lo.- 26c 50c, 76c, Box seats. |1. Matinee 
prices — l'ii tli in. Douglas 70. 



Van Ness Theatre 



The Orpheum programme for next week will have for its 
new feature the musical comedy stars Sam Chip in 
Marble, who will appear in what is termed a defl lialog 
Old Edam." written especially for them by Anna Marble Pol- 
lock. Something new in the way of dancing will be introdue°d 
bv the si\ American dancers, Estelle and Adelaide ' 
Evelyn Ran ranor and Pnrcella and Orden. Bob 

' tews and Herbert Ashley will be on hand with a diverting 
and novel skit entitled "Hi ' : 1" 

on the East river, New York, showing the East river brids 
Brooklyn bridge and the Statue of Liberty in the d 
King for a \ red by Frank J. Com 



CORNER VAN NESS XVh. 
AND GROVE STREET. 
Phone Market 500 
Beginning Sunday night. August 1st. Second and lasl week, Mati- 
nee Saturday. Frederic Thompson's massive production of Amer- 
ica's ' imatlc 9 

POLLY OF THE CIRCUS. 

By Margaret Mayo. Last time Sunday night. August 8th. 
Augubl Kth— PAID IN FULL. 

T-j • rni 1 ELLIS ST., NR. FILLMORE 

h J 'V"iry)PpQQ I hPCltVP, Class A Theatr.. 

J. I tVtOtTdd ±IWU,VI V s Loveric „ M , n , ger p„ „e West 663 

iinee Saturday and Sua. lav. Lest two nights. THE BELLE 
OF NEW YORK 

Beginning Monday night, m-xt week only, tie international musi- 
cal comedy hit, 

FLORODORA. 

Magnificent production perfect east, beautiful girl chorus. 

Prices — Evenings, Hit . Matinees, 85c. and 50c. 

Valencia Street, between I3lh and I4U» 
Telephone. Market 17 

This Sundav afternoon and evening. Last times of AT THE 
WHITE HORSE TAVERN. 
Starting Monday. Aug-ust 8d, 

ALL THE COMFORTS OF HOME 
Gillette's furiously funny comedy, with PAUL MCALLISTER and 
all of the Valencia laugh-makers. 

Wednesday matin-. turday and Sunday matinees. 10c. 

1 50c. Evening prices. SSc. to $1. Seats on sale at 
the Emporium. 
Next— THE PRIVATE SECRETARY. 



New Cliutes ™™<*-™y 



Turk and Webster 



Supreme for summer time fun. Gi 'tractions In 

at Beginning this Sunday. 

GLASSCOCK'S TRAINED ELEPHANTS. 
Featuring "Little Mike." the famous clown elephant of the Bar- 
num shows. Last S earance of T) w acts 

-ION AND FLORENCE SPRAY. Special concerts al" 
and night by the ROYAL BANDA ROMA. Bring the children to 
see the LONDON PUNCH AND JOKY SHOW. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 31, 1909 




BvT^" 






^ 




The crash of crockery sounds in Fad-land. The waitresses' 
union has given notice to Cupid and is about to walk out. Nectar 
and ambrosia will no longer he served en tasse nor demi-tasse 
either. To come nearer to earth, a casual glance at the engage- 
ment presents of the girls who have recently signified their in- 
tention of entering the holy bonds of matrimony convinces that 
the engagement cup has had it- day, and will soon be placed on 
the shelf and become a hallowed memory. Men will fall into 
their anecdotage and sadly tell of the happy days when you sim- 
ply walked into a store and ordered a cup. costly the crockery as 
your purs> would buy. Even women will hark back to the good 
old time when a cup was the official token for an engagement 
gift. With the field of selection narrowed to cups, any woman 
could go forth and choose without first bracing up on a nerve 
tonic. 

But the sign of the times is written large enough to read with- 
out lorgnettes. The cup is doomed; and we might as well pre- 
pare ourselves for the crash. Henceforth we must gird our cour- 
age for the feat of making $5 look like $15 worth of remem- 
brance. It was easier to do while cups were in fashion. Clever 
giils prowled around nntil they found something queer and ugly 
enough to look as though it must have cost a small fortune. Even 
the engaged girl with the appraisinir rye found ii difficult to size 
up her cup without consulting the shop-keeper. And now the 
eup is dead, and the assorted presents are in vogue. 

The happy day of the butter spreader and the electric lamp, 
the cake dish and the andiron-, lias arrived. The engaged girl 
will once more have a job-lot to proudly show to her admiring 
friends. In the East the eup is already entirely defunct, and 
out here its popularity is sadly chipped. Among the lovely en- 
gagement presents which Helen Baker has received are compara- 
tively few cups, whereas last season, when Constance de Young, 
for instance, announced her engagi ment, some two hundred cups 
immediately found their way to her door. 

Brides will doubtless be glad that they will no longer have to 
figure on a modern crockery department in their new homes. 
Hundreds of cups are an impedimenta with which to begin mar- 
ried life. Gift cups are so fragile and precious Eor caterers to 
handle at a tea light, and many a hostess hesitates about using 
them at the one legitimate time Eor making use of her engage- 
ment cups. The day of making a permi n: display of tea things 

has likewise passed. The tea table in a smart establishment is as 
rare as nightingales' nests in the park. The tea thing- must now 
be wheeled in on a tea wagon and peripatetic tea is the only kind 
a fashionable could digest. So !ha; the bride carrying an excess 
baggage of cups cannot even find m permanent place for some of 
them on a tea table in these days of lea wagons. A bride setting 
up her goods in ,\n apartment or' flat often bad to store her en- 
gagement cups. When Charlotte Wilson married young Cad- 
wallader, they made their home in a flat, and the hundreds of 
cups which she had received as engagement gifts were the great- 
est problems of their existence. So while the: fad simplified 
matters Eor the donor, it cluttered up life for the recipient, and 
possibly it is only fair nlay that it should be turn about now. At 
any rate, it is an assured fact that the eup ha? had its da. as 
an engagement sift. 

Apropos of such affairs, 1 hear that Miss Livermore, who re- 
cently married a German, was exceedingly touched by the num- 
ber and beauty of the remembrances sent by her California 
friends. A friend who met the 'gentleman whom she has mar- 
ried writes me that he is one of the handsomest men she has 
seen during her travels, and an exceedingly charming chap whose 
life has heretofore been entirely dedicated to music. In fact, 
it was while studying music with him that tbev decided that 
marriage was the harmonic chord, after all. 

Just now the conversation down Blingum way sounds like a 
page from the Carpenters" Gazette. Every one 'is either build- 
ing a house or adding on a wing, and the conversation naturally 
ranges from fenestration to strength of supports. The absurd 
statement that the Croekers and the Carolans have determined 



/f, 



^ 



FAIRMONT HOTEL 



The result of forty years experience 
in catering to the discriminating trav- 
elers of every nation. 

Single rooms with bath from S2.50 per day 
upwards. 

v Palace Hotel Company . 

to outdo each other in the matter of new homes is by those who 
know considered too ridiculous to even deny.. Mrs. Cardan's 
house was built before her father's death, and therefore is inade- 
quate to the millions she has since inherited. In fact, the stable, 
built after the house, always made the stranger wonder why the 
horse was housed so much more magnificently than the man. 
The I 'rockers will, of course, have to have I huge place now that 
the family is passing out of the 'teens, but any one who knows 
either Mrs. Crocker or Mrs. Carolan appreciates the humor of 
supposing (bat they would build in a spirit of rivalry. The 
Grants will also build a magnificeni new' home on the place 
■■ ■. } i • re the lire -o recently destroyed their house. Young Cudahy, 
whose engagement to Miss Brewer has just been announced, is 
looking around for a place, and will either buy or build in the 
environs of Burlingame, which means that the young couple 
expect to spend at least part of the year out here. 

Miss Aida Ehrlick, the talented and charming daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Ehrlick, was married on the twentieth 
of I he month to that well-known young gentleman, Mr. Bruce 
Clark Kennedy. The young couple have been busy receiving 
congratulations from their hosts of friends. After a tour they 
will return to San Francisco. 

At a pretty, informal wedding in the St. Francis last week, 
\1 is- Hazel Colnon became Mrs. Howard T. Smith. The bride 
is a prominent Stockton girl, a graduate of Notre Dame Convent, 
and one of the owners of the Stockton Mail. The groom is a 
capitalist with large interests at Suisun. where the young people 
will make their future home. Since the wedding, Mr. and Mrs. 
Smith have been at the St. Francis, where they have been ex- 
tensively entertained by Senator and Mrs. Belshaw and many 
ol hi ■•■ friends in town. 

City Attorney Luke Howe, of Sacramento, Mrs. E. P. Howe, 
and Miss Helen Howe, were dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. H. H. 
Grau at Pacific Grove Hotel on Sunday. Other prominent Sac- 
ramentans in the house are Mrs. L. B. Richardson and daughter. 
Miss Minnie; A. M. Richardson was down for an over-Sunday 
visit with them; State Librarian James L. Gilles, Mrs. Gilles and 
Dr. E. L. Southworth, who, with his family, J. E. Govan and 
i ill . and T. J. Zuirin and wife, make up a party arriving some 
days ago in the Southworth machine, and who are to remain sev- 
eral weeks. Mrs. J. A. Hughson, Miss Beth and Eleanor J. 
Hughson, Mrs. Hamilton, wife of County Clerk \V. B. Hamilton. 
I h. II. L. Nichols, Mrs. Mary Phleiger and Miss Marie Phleiger. 

At a pretty luncheon in the St. Frauds last week, Mr. and 
Mrs. Bemi P. Schwerin and Miss Genevieve King were the 
guests of Mrs. George Cameron. 



BLANCO 


9 


s 


O'FARRELL AND LARKIN STREETS 






PHONE FRANKLIN 9 






No visitor should leave the city without seeing the 


finest cafe in America. Our new annex 


is 


now 


open. 







July 31, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



13 



The Feast of Lanterns, which closed this season's Chautauqua 
Assembly at Pacific Grove, was the usual fine success, mosl 
spectacular in effect and worth a trip of many miles to witness. 
Some two thousand of the vari-colored Chinese globes were 
brought into use in the shore arrangement, extending from 
Lovers' Point some distance around the cove curve, while man,) 
small boats on the bay showed lantern lights, and they circled 
from position to position, amid a shower of fireworks, recalled 
the Chinese legion from which originated the present day fes- 
tival. 

List of guests registered at Hotel Eafael last week — Albert 
Fries, Mrs. Gielow, the Misses Kumner, \V. M. O'Connor, Mr. 
and Mrs. P. W. Smith, Miss McFeely, Miss Berniee Barr, S. 
M. Heller, Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Sughes, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. 
Green, Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Groenendyke, Mrs. Jesse D. Carr, 
William M. Blaim. 

Mrs. William H. Blake has with her this week at Hotel Eafael 
the Misses Kumner and her sister, Mrs. Jesse D. Carr. 

H. V. Hartraupt, President of the California Home Extension 
Association, spent several days in Pacific Grove, and other parts 
of Monterey peninsula last week. Mr. Hartraupt is engaged, on 
his trip, in looking up large tracts of land for the planting of 
eucalyptus. 

Miss Maizie Coyle entertained a number of her girl friends 
at tea in the St. Francis several days ago, in honor of her friend, 
Miss Angela Harrison, who is a popular Santa Barbara belle. 

Mrs. L. L. Baker and her daughter Helen have returned to 
Hotel Rafael after a short stay at Sisson, California. 

Tuesday evening Mrs. Gielow gave a very interesting illustra- 
tion of the plantation songs and stories of the South in the par- 
lors of Hotel Rafael, the audience being enthusiastic and ap- 
preciative. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ansel Easton and Laurance Easton came up 
from Burlingame and spent most of the week past at the St. 
Francis. 

Freight officials of the overland roads having terminals on the 
Pacific Coast, met at the St. Francis last week to review their 
east and west bound freight tariff. 




Priti - 
exhibition at Sk i 



Mr. William Fries, Presideni of the t alifornia Pruil Canners 

Association, lias had his six-cylinder Lozier Automobile broughl 
over in San Rafael. This same lias rivaled quite a good deal of 

interest among the auto enthusiasts, as it is really a ear p 

in every detail, and its appearance is thai of the bighesl type of 

wealth and comfort on wheels. 

Mr. W. S. Pierce is at Hotel Rafael this week, coming Erom 
Los Angeles to enjoy the perfect climate of San Rafael. 

(Continued to Page l'i.) 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 



THE INSPIRATION OF 
SOCIAL AMENITIES 



Under the management of JAMES WOODS 



Hotel Rafael 



San Rafael, Cal. 



Under the management of J. H. HOLMES 

formerly of Hotel Green. Pasadena 



Buy tickets and check baggage direct to San Rafael. 
Special attention given to Touring parties. 



Spend your vacation and your week end outings at 

Hotel Del Monte 

during the 

ANNUAL MONTH OF SPORTS 

Aueusl 15th to September 16th 

ANNUAL DOG SHOW, 

ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT, 

FIRST STATE BRIDGE WHIST CONGRESS 

ANNUAL TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 

OPENING OF PEBBLE BEACH LODGE. 

Make your plans to be there. Write Tor rates and reservations 
today to H. R. WARNER, Manager. 



Hotel Westminster 



Los Angeles, Cal. 

Fourth and Main Stt. 



American Plan 

REOPENED 

Rates per T»ay. $2.50 Rooms without Bath. 
Rooms with Bath. *3.00. $3.50 and MOO. 

European Plan 

11.00 jer day and up 
With bath. $1.60 and up. 



F O JOHNSON, Proprietor 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Gough Streets 

Acomfortable. high order, uptown hotel, now under the manage- 
ment of THOMAS H. SHEDDEN, formerly manager of St. 

Danstan's. 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 31, 1909 




"Did you enjoy your ride in the taxicab?" "N-not ex- 
actly. I was t-too busy watching the indicator." — Cleveland 
Plain Dealer. 



{Continued from Page 13.) 

Outdoor Sports at Del Monte. 

In addition to the annual affairs which take place on the golf 
links and the tennis courts, a number of other events are planned 
for this month. The first Bridge Whist Congress to be held in 
California will take place here September 1st to 4th. This is un- 
der the direction of Mrs. A. J. Griffin, of Los Angeles, known 
as an authority on bridge whist over the whole coast. Two events 
wall be played each dav with prizes for teams and pairs. Hotel 
Del Monte has off ered "a fine cup for the individual making (be 
largest score. The dog show will also add a great deal to the 
interest in the month. This is held under the auspices of the 
Ladies' Kennel Association of California, and will be held August 
20th and 21st. 

The golf tournament will bring out an unusual crowd this sea- 
son. There will be the first play for the Del Monte champion- 
ship and a team match between northern and southern Cali- 
fornia. As there is considerable rivalry between the clubs of 
these sections, a very keen game is expected. 

On the tennis courts Miss May Sutton will appear, possible 
for tlie last time on account of her approaching marriage. 

There is talk now of bringing Regatta week within the month 
of sports, and the Monterey Boat Club is working hard to ac- 
complish this. 

Miss Ethel Bagnall, of San Francisco, sailed on the '■Amer- 
ica," July 24th, for Paris. Miss Bagnall will mix business with 
pleasure on this trip, as it is her intention while abroad to secure 
Paris models for the firm of Bagnall & Boughton. 

Pear-Admiral and Mrs. T. F. Jewell arrived at the Fairmont 
from the Orient on Saturday. Admiral Jewell is en route to 
Washington. 

Mr. and Mrs. II. F. Dutton of San Francisco, with Miss Page- 
Brown of New York, and Talbot C. Walker of San Francisco, 
spent the week-end at Del Monte. 

Mr. Carl Wollf was host at a prettily appointed dinner given 
at the Fairmont in honor of the Havemeyer girls, who are visit- 
ing from New York. Among the guests were Mrs. Stone, Mrs. 
Haskins, Miss Vera Havemeyer, Miss Ethel Havemeyer, Mr. 
Stilling, Mr. Stone Hiiiyer Dueprey. Mr. Barton. 

Miss Edmee Anlieuser. a well-known society woman of Si. 
Louis, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Dewey A. Hickey and F. 
B. Nielsen, arrived at Del Moiite last week, and spent a few days 
enjoying its beauty and quiet. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Dibblee have been in town for tin past 
few days, having made the Fairmont their headquarters. The 

Dibblees are spending the summer at their charming c r. 

home in Boss. 



77/ A' CONTRARIES OF LIFE. 

Did it ever occur to you that a man's life is full of trouble 
and temptation? He comes into the world without his consent. 
and goes out against his will, and the trip between is exceedingly 
rough. The rule of contraries is one of the features of this trip. 

When he is little the big giris kiss him; when he is big the 
little girls kiss him. If he is poor he is a bad manager; if he 
is rich he is dishonest. If he needs credit he can't get it; if 
he is prosperous, every one wants to do him a favor. Tell a 
man you like him, and he's suspicious; tell him you don't like 
him and he's sore. 

If he is in politics it is for graft, and if he's out of politics 
he's a bad citizen. If he doesn't give to charity he is stingy; if 
he does it's for show. If he is religious he's a hypocrite; if he's 
not religious he's tabooed. If be shows affection be is a soft 
specimen; if he cares for no one but himself he is cold-blooded. 
If he dies young there was a great future before him; if lie lives 
to an old age he's missed his calling. 

If you save money you're a pig; if you spend it you're a spend- 
thrift ; if you get it you're a grafter ; if you don't you're a fool. 
So what's the use? — Musical Age. 



A SKIN OF BEAUTY IS A JOY FOREVER 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER 

Removes Tan. Pimples, Freckle*. Moth-Palcne*. 
Rash and Skin Diseases, and every blemish on 
beauty, and defies detection. I( has stood the t«l 
of 60 years; no other has, and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure i( is properly made. Accept no 
counterfeit of similar name. The distinguished Dr. 
L. A. Say re said to a lady of the bant- ton (a patient): 
"At yon ladies will use them. 1 recommend 'Gou- 
rand's Cream' as the least harmful of all the Skin 
preparation!." . 

For sale by alt Druggists and Fancy Goods Dealers. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET POWDER 

For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed, Relieves Skin Irritations, cures Sun- 
bum and renders an excellent complexion. Price 25 Cents, by Mai!. 

GOLRAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 

Removes Superfluous Hair. Price Si. 00. by mail 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Propr, 37 Great Jones St.. New York C.iy. 




LOUIS GASSNER 



(Manufacturing Furrier) 



NOW OPEN 



At New Location 



112-114 GEARY STREET 



^^* /J 


Phone 


Franklin 2802 


cvtk^ 


^y Art and Refine- 
^^ ment are Dis- 
played by Taste- 
ful Attire 


y (y^ 


-MAKERS OF-- 


LADIES' GOWNS and FANCY 

1321 SUTTER STREET. Near Van Ness Ave. 


COSTUMES 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Murphy Grant & Company 

Wholesale Dry Goods 

N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 

New Goods constantly arriving and on sale. 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne 

PAPER 

14O0 to 145Q Fourth St., San Francisco. Telephone Market 3014 
Private Exchange Connecting all Departments 

DR. EDWARD F. GLASER 

EYE. EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 



Murine is a Domestic Eye Remedy. 
Reliable Relief for Byes That Need Care. Doesn't Smart. 



Office Hours: 1 to 4 P. M. 
and toy appointment 



Galen Bldg-.. 391 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 



Phone Douglas 4138 



July 31, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



15 



®lj*> fnrtola Jfaattual 



It is quite evident, from the amount of publicity obtained and 
the result of eucleavor by those in charge in securing the atten- 
tion of our own and foreign governments, that strong personali- 
ties and able business men are behind the Portola movement 
making for the big fest at San Francisco in October. 

It is more than probable that the adventurer, Portola, is to 
be made a great hero, despite himself, and that the Fathers of 
the Church, who were immeasurably greater than the Soldiers 
of Fortune, and who did more, larger and enduring things, are 
for the moment to be forgotten. 

That will only be for the moment., however, and out of the 
paucity of information surrounding Portola and his history, a 
needed mysticism arises, an atmosphere that would in all proba- 
bility be lacking in the correctly kept, records of the Catholic 
Church and its earlier militant brotherhoods. 

Therefore, Portola is the thing to boost, and the boosters are 
at it might and main, and it is the News Letter's advice that 
every man and woman who has the good of the community at 
heart, boost the Portola festival. The name of San Francisco 
and of California will resound from one end of the world to the 
other, and the glories of the Mystic Crew of Comus and the 
Carnival King of New Orleans will be eclipsed on the shores of 
the Balboan sea. Get it in heart and soul. Imbibe the Portola 
spirit ! Away with pessimism and up with the banner of the 
optimist. Let us all get in line for the big festival, to the end 
that the St. Louis annual show shall be only as a tallow dip 
alongside of the great Western glory of Portola. Let us glorify 
adventure and the search for the unknown, the mystic and the 
exciting. ,* 

Then here's to Portola and his festival. Here's to a celebra- 
tion of our own achievements as rcbuilders. Here's to the Spirit 
of the Doing of Things! Portola exemplified this spirit, and as 
a lay patron saint for the San Franciscan he will do quite well, 
I [ere's to Harmony! 

What have we to offer the stranger? 



The biggest naval review thai has ever been held in American 

waters ! . 

The largest amount of cosmopolitanism lor the Ieaai price! 

The wonders accomplished since the fire. A practical exposi- 
tion of achievement under the motto proposed by the News Loi- 
ter after the fire : Eesurgam. 

A beautiful eity and a beautiful country, to he seeu in the 
most beautiful months of the year in California — October. 

The President of the United States will be present in person. 

The big balloon race and the aviation tests. 

There will be three big parades that will "put it. over" any- 
thing ever attempted in this country in tin' pageantry line! 

Each parade will be symbolic of some big event in the history 
of California. 

The athletic meet will include polo, golf, tennis, football, base- 
ball, lacrosse, wrestling, boxing and other sports. 

The decorations and the illuminations will be alone worth 
crossing the continent to see. San Francisco will surpass any- 
thing ever before attempted in the line of niglTt display. 

Will the stranger leave the gates of Son Francisco feeling that, 
he has been given a feast of beautiful things? Will he depart 
carrying in his mind's-eye a riot of color seldom equaled? Will 
he have heard music, seen sights, heard oratory and sensed an 
enterprise the world never before has shown? We, as loyal San 
Franciscans, are modest, but we believe that the stranger will see, 
hear and sense all of the above and more. So, whoop it up for 
Portola and his citv! 



The Pitcher. 

Harry McCormick, the Giants' star hitter, replied with an 
anecdote to a compliment on his hatting. 

"I coftld always bat," he said. ''One Fourth, in my boy- 
hood, a pitcher was taken out of the box after I had knocked a 
home run, and another pitcher was substituted. 

"As I was taking a drink after my round of Hie bases, I beard 
a pretty girl in the grand stand say: 'Oh, how stupid of them to 
change their pitcher. The other man was awfully good. He bit 
the bat nearly every time.'" — Boston Qlobe. 



LOW RATES 
TO 



Alaska-Yukon- Pacific 

Exposition 



FOR ROUND TRIP TICKETS 


FROM 




SAN FRANCISCO 


$32.50 


SACRAMENTO 


32.50 


LATHROP 


32.50 


STOCKTON 


32.50 


TRACY 


32.50 


SUISUN 


32.50 


DAVIS 


32.50 


NAPA 


32.7? 


SANTA ROSA 


33.60 


CALISTOGA 


33.95 



Greatly reduced rates from other points in California. Tickets sold 

daily until September 30, and cover two months' trip going 

and coming via the famous 

Shasta Route 

of the 

Southern Pacific 



Stopovers going and coming. Many other routes at slightly higher 
rates for you to select from. 

Write or call on our nearest agent for full details of service, etc. 
or address 

FLOOD BUILDING for information 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 31, 1909 




By S. F. Batman. 




("When you come into court for trial, if the evidence warrants con- 
viction, be prepared to go to jail." 

This was the language used by Police Judere Shortall in addressing 
"Kid" Schwartz and John I^iebold, charged with gambling at the ball 
park, when the pair asked for a continuance of their cases. Continuing, 
the magistrate said: 

"I will put yjur cases over until next Tuesday because your attorney 
is not here/ but I warn you now to be prepared to go to jail if you are 
found guilty. Baseball is the one clean professional sport we have left 
in this country, and I beiieve that the management of the game should 
be upheld in their efforts to stamp out gambling if it is attempted at the 
park. They can certainly count on my assistance, and if a man is 
found guilty in my court he will be given severe punishment." 



San Francisco is in a fair way to win a baseball pennant this 
year, and the prospect has worked the fans of this city up to a 
pitch of interest such as the old town lias not known since that 
season, now so long ago, when the locals, under the leadership 
of Ed. Pabst, grabbed the bunting and sent a thrill of delight 
through the veins of every baseball "bug" in the burg. 

It must be said for the local managers that they have tried 
hard to get a winning combination. None know better than they 
that a winning team in the best-paying city of the league is a 
money-getter, and the baseball club is not hiring men and main- 
taining big grounds for any other reason than to secure a portion 
of the enormous revenue which flows annually into the coffers 
of baseball, and from which the fans cheerfully part to get a 
sight of the national pastime. 

Luck broke badly for Danny Long for several seasons. Men 
who could tear the cover off the ball in the Oshkosh and Podunk 
Leagues came here and acted as if they had never seen a bat be- 
fore. Fielders who were carried off the field in Smith's Corners 
and Red Horse Rapids for their sensational fielding, tried to 
scoop the ball with their fares, while pitchers whose strike-out 
records were published on the front page of the Farmertown 
Clarion, could not put the ball within six feet of the rubber 
when they went to work at Recreation Park. 

Of course, such luck could not last, and Long's time came. His 
first victory over the fickle goddess was when he corralled Zeider 
from Winnipeg. Ball players from the wilds of Canada were 
curious specimens here, but when the only Rollie got into the 
game, a broad smile illuminated the features of the baseball 
magnate, and quickly spread to the countenances of the loyal 
San Francisco fans. The regret that Zeider had to go to Chi- 
cago in the beginning of this season did not last long, as Charles 
Comiskey, the Pooh-Bah of the White Sox, decided that he did 
not need Zeider, and what was Comiskey's loss was San Fran- 
cisco's gain, as Zeider has been playing the greatest game of his 
career this season. The San Francisco third baseman rarely 
fails to pull off something special. II is fielding is always high- 
class, his base-running i- so during thai it would be foolhardy 
were it not that he generally geSs away with his stunts, and there 
is only one man in the league leading him in batting at tin/ 
present time. 

The consistency of ihe work of the Seals is best drown by the 
fact that, only one series has been lo.-t this season. This was 
the first played with the Senators, and tlii^ week there is a pros- 
pect of history repeating itself. Graham's fighting Saeramento 
bunch will have a little the best of the start, as Mohler and Ten- 
nant, two of the local innelders, are out of the game tem- 
porarily. 

It looks like an acknowledgment by the Oakland management 
that all hopes of winning the pennant have been abandoned, and 
that the coffers must be attended to before the place of the team 
in the race. Maybe they figure that coin in the hand now will 
be useful in getting together a bunch for next year that will not 
reside in the cellar as long as this year's aggregation. 

Vernon, which is now carrying the booby banner, lately re- 
linquished by Oakland, has also fallen for the wiles of Robinson, 
the president of the St. Louis Nationals, and has sold its phe- 
nomenal pitcher, Raleigh, to the magnate. Raleigh was one of 
the finds of the season. He jumped from obscurity to the full 
glare of the calcium's light in a month, and he will be badly 
missed by the village team of which Happy Hogan is leader. 
Raleigh is only nineteen years of age, and if his rapid advance- 
ment does not interfere with the size of his hat, he will make a 
splutter in the big bush. 

Carson, the Portland pitcher who shut out the Los Angeles 



team without a hit or a run, had hard luck in having one of the 
Angel batters reach first through a miscue by Shortstop Olson. 

It is more than likely that the Moreings, who came from 
Stockton to take hold of the Oakland outlaws, have lost consider- 
able money in their venture. 

One of the main causes of the decline of outlaw ball was the 
frequent altercations which took place between the players and 
the umpires. Strange as it may appear, the very fans who yell 
the loudest for "scrappy" and aggressive ball, are the first to 
get disgusted when a player oversteps the line of justifiable re- 
monstrance and either uses abusive language or actually man- 
handles the umpire. 

The boys around the baseball park are telling how Jack G lea- 
son "put one over" on a prominent Eastern baseball magnate 
while he was in the East. They were together watching a game, 
when a ball was hit to shortstop, and a runner was forced out 
at second.- The fielder just failed to complete the double play at 
first. The next batter up slammed the ball to the same place, 
and this time the shortstop pulled off the double, retiring the 
side. 

"Great fielding," said Jack to his friend. . "It's too bad that 
he didn't make the double the first time. Two double plays in 
one inning is something I have never seen." 

"I never did, either," replied the Easterner, and then he was 
sunk in thought for a couple of minutes. 

"Why, Jack, if he had made the double the first time, he 
wouldn't have had to make a double the second time," he ex- 
claimed suddenly waking up. 

"I said it was something I never saw," said Gleason, and the 
drinks were on the other fellow. 



E. B. COURVOISIER. 
Art Dealer, Frame Maker. New store, 431 Sutter street, be- 
tween Stockton and Powell. 



\ 




/ 



CURES 



/ 



HEADACHES 

10*35* 50* X $19° Bottles* 



V 



WHY? 



Ask the man who sold you your ready-made shirts 
why he had those for his personal use made to 
order 



WHY? 



D. C. HEGER, 243 Kearny St., San Francisco 

Shirts and Underwear to Order Phone Douglas 3641 



July 31, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



Li 




A fortnight ago, the insurgents of 
Crisis in Morocco. Morocco started a real revolution, 

and now it has readied the crisis 
stage with all Europe more or less directly involved. As yet, 
only Spain has reached the firing line and engaged the Moors, 
but the affair has gone far enougli to make a compromise very 
difficult, especially so because the Moroccan tribesmen do not 
want peace. It is now a war with them for the preservation 
of Mohammedanism and the extinction of Christianity. As the 
despatches show, Spain has been thrust to the front all alone, 
whereas, in fact, she should not be there at all, for she agreed at 
the Algeciras convention to do nothing more than assist France 
in policing the country. But her Ambassador having been given 
his passports, she will have to accept whatever follows. Of 
course, though, Prance first and next Great Britain will join 
Spain on the battle line. It has already been suggested that the 
Algeciras convention be reconvened, which no doubt will be done 
immediately, unless the Moors refuse to lay down their arms, 
in which event it will be incumbent upon France to exercise her 
treaty rights and practically overthrow the Government. On 
the other hand, the alignment of the nations in interest has 
changed materially during the last three years. Then Eussia 
stood with France as against Germany in the Moroccan conven- 
tion, and Austria was lukewarm in her defense of the Berlin 
scheme. But now Russia, as is Austria-Hungary, is bound to 
support Germany's position in any event, unless the success 
of the Eusso-British combination in Persia, just consummated, 
obliges the Czar to withdraw from the new triple alliance and 
return to the Franco-British rapprochement and stand for 
French supervision. In that event, the scheme of the Germanic 
race to push over the Balkans and swoop down upon Salonika 
would have to be postponed indefinitely. It is not of so much 
importance, therefore, whether the Moroccan tribesmen succeed 
in putting a new Sultan on the throne or not, but the crisis 
will become critical if any nation other than France attempts 
to take advantage of existing conditions to get a foothold on 
Moroccan soil. We all remember how France and Germany just 
escaped a war over this same international issue three years ago. 



Premier Beiand. 



To Americans, the elevation of Mr. 
Briand to the Premiership of 
France is a mere passing event, but 
it is very different in Europe. Briand is nut only the foremost 
socialist of France, but he is a sincere one and lie peer of any 
other member of the new cabinet. Naturally, Germany, Austria. 
Russia and Italy are watching to see whal his internal policy 
will unfold, for he is Minister of the [nterior as well as Pre- 
mier. He has it in his power to greatl] advance and dignify 
the Bocialisl part$ an. I give it a 

French national politics, bul la 1 is also a conservatii lan, and 
has always stood against extreme measures, and lias alwa 
posed anything like international trouble such as mighi lead 
to war. But if he acts as Premier as he lias talked as a 1 1 
there will be a great turning over in the n - iment, 

(or next to Russia's, it is i 1 -i in Rurope. Bui 

BO much as to what may happen in France, bul what the influ- 
ence of Premier Briand may have upon tin- socialistic movi 
in the Continental nations. The socialists 

in their country, and one that the Kaiser does oot care 
to think about. Moreover, they are the mosl intellig ol of the 
socialistic contingent in Europe, and pr.'_ is to the 

point of revolution. For these and >Ul - 

ol Briand to head the new French cabinet may become a 
a ebneern. 



It is now admitted by both England 
As in Persia. and Russia that Persia has already 

al- 
i t he young Shah will continue up 
divisions of the territory ai died "spheres of in tl 

and the separation is made with reference to protecting In 



England and Russian territory in the north. How far tin 
ownership is going to cripple Germany's Bcheme for a great rail- 
way system in A-ia Minor is a problem of great mom. , 
the occupation of Persia by Russia and England is sure to head 
off German immigration in the region of the Persian Gulf. 

Turkey is still talking war with Greece, and the Sultan 

is having all he can do to keep Salonika, or Macedonian, army 
corps from rushing on to Athens, but it is believed that King 
Edward will be able to patch up a truce until the Young Turks 
are sobered down a little. However, the Greeks are quite as 
anxious for war as the Turks. 



TFrHATT TAVERN 

■■■ ■■— I ^"» ■*■ ■" *■ ^ Cor. Eddy and Powell Sts. 

Cafe and Ladies' Grill 

Rigo 

and His Gypsy Orchestra. Concerts Daily During Shopping Hours 

FROM 3:30 TO 5:00 P. M. 

AND FROM 

6:30 TO 8:30 P. M. 

10:30 TO 1:00 A.M. 

Private Dining Booths and Banquet Rooms on 

Mezzanine Floor. Entrance — No. 4 Eddy St. 

Under the management of A. C. MORRISSON 




New 

Poodle 

Dog 

Restaurant 

and 

IT . i N. W. Corner 
nOiei Polk & Post Sts. 
San Francisco 

Phone 

Franklin 2960 



For Oysters 
Moraghan's Restaurant 

26 Ellis Street 

Music during dinner. Open Sundays. 





The Leading Restaurant 
of San Francisco 

REGULAR DINNER S1.25 
or A la Carte 

342 Sutter Street San Francisco 



MAISON DOREE HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

151-157 ELLIS STREET. ABOVE POWELL. Up-to-date Establishment 

Lunch with wine 75c Dinner with wine $1.25. Mosic every evening. 

Phone Ex. DouzIjs HMO connecting all apartments 
Emile Fonteiller. formerly with the Pop: Victor Laborie: John Dnbourdieu. formerly with the 
Poodle Dog. 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 31, 1909 




Bartnett 
the Man. 



Walter J. Bartnett has just re- 
turned from New York, where he 
has succeeded in interesting some of 
the leading bankers and financiers 
in that city in the reorganization of the California Sale Deposit 
and Trust Company. Another difficult task has been accom- 
plished by him in the face of great ami seemingly insurmount- 
able obstacles. 

Mr. Bartnett, it seems, has powerful friends in New York 
who have faith and confidence in him and his works, and who be- 
lieve that he has been cruelly wronged. 

The News Letter has watched this man with interest and with 
admiration. His opponents say that he is a visionary and an 
optimist but it is pointed out that his visions come true and his 
optimism has always teen of the kind that expands with the 
country. 

J. Pierpont Morgan, James J. Hill and C. P. Huntington 
were optimists. 

As proof of the statement made that Bartnett's visions it it s<> 
please you to call them, come true is to be found in the fruition 
of an idea, the Western Pacific Railroad, ft is to be found in the 
successful dream, the Central California Traction Company, it 
is to be seen in the last difficult task, the enlistment of Eastern 
financiers in the rebuilding of a wrecked bank. 

ft is the optimist and the visionary that does things, always 
providing that the optimism is energetic and the visionings have 
a practical base. Mr. Bartnett lias had faith in the Trust Com- 
pany and he has made cold hard-headed men of business believe 
in it by demonstrating fact after fact until negative and doubt 
were swept away. The New York bankers caused a careful in- 
vestigation to be made of the assets of the Trust Company. This 
investigation convinced the bankers of the correctness of the 
representations made by Mr. Bartnett and by Mr. Raphael, the 
President of the Depositors' Association. 

Mr. Raphael has been in Mew York the past two months co- 
operating with Mr. Bartnett in this great work. The Depositors' 
Association made an independent investigation and appraise- 
ment of the assets. This appraisement shows values of about 
nine millions of dollars. This appraisemenl was made by a 
committee of merchants of which Mr. William Metzger, the 
President of the.Nonatuck Silk Company, was chairmau. The 
Stockholders' Committee, of which Mr. Julius A. Young was 
chairman, made an appraisement which reached practically the 
same results. 

It is to be hoped that Mr. Le Breton will not allow his per- 
sonal interests or those of his nephew, Mr. Laveaga, who is the 
attorney for the receiver, to interfere with the success of this 
movement. Of course a receivership always means and rightly 
too, large fees for the receivership and his attorney. There 
are, besides, other large advantages which may accrue to the 
friends of the receiver. This particular receivership is no excep- 
tion. The receiver was allowed $15,000 for 'his fees for the first 
year, and besides this, he collected a salary from one of the sub- 
sidiary companies. Mr. Laveaga was allowed $25,000 as the 
attorney for the receiver, and he collected, besides, $8,000 as at- 
torney for the subsidiary companies and $2,500 for office ex- 
penses, making a total of over $35,000. 

The receiver and his attorney thus received $50,000 for the 
first year. This does not include book-keeping salaries, clerk 
hire, and the office expenses of the receiver, etc. 

The Depositors' Association and the general public are watch- 
ing with interest the attitude that Mr. Le Breton will take. Sin- 
cerely, it is hoped that he will co-operate with the depositors 
and stockholders, who are working so hard to effect this reor- 
ganization and that there will be no scandal in the discharge of 
the receivership. 

Mr. Le Breton will act wisely if he will sacrifice personal 
profit and gain for himself, and for his nephew the thanks and 
the esteem of the many thousands of depositors and the stock- 
holders concerned in this institution. 

This reorganization will not only benefit the stockholders, but 



will be a boon to the depositors. It will relieve from all 
liability the stockholders who contribute to the new capital for 
their subscriptions, the stockholders will receive stock in the new 
trust company, which stock will be worth par or more from the 
commencement, and this stock will rapidly increase in value. 



The good will of ten thousand de- 
The New Company. positors is an asset of great value. 

It is recognized as such by the New 
York bankers. The new company will have in its directorate 
men of recognized strength in the financial ' world. Confidence 
will be restored. The assets of the old institution, taken out 
of the hands of the receiver and operated under a competent man- 
agement as a going concern, will give results far greater than 
can be expected through any receivership. This reorganization 
will enable the stockholders to in part recoup their losses. 

It is a time for action, for rebuilding, and not for tearing 
down. 



alpa Rubber Plantations 



Shortly returning from a personal 
La Zacdalpa Company, visit, extending over a period of five 

months, to the domain of the Zjjcu- 
in Mexico, Vice-President and Gen- 
eral Manager O. H. Harrison's report, on the gratifying 
productive condition of the property and the progress 
that has been made in cultivation and planting, is con- 
tained in a brochure just from the press. Mr. Harrison 
sets forth that the past season was noteworthy in having been 
attended by the heaviest rainfall ever experienced in the section 
of the company's plantations ; but the drainage system met the 
test and carried off the waste water without occasioning more 
than nominal damage. This system, of which fifty miles was 



HIGH GRADE INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

LIST ON REQUEST 

SutrO & CO., Brokers 



412 Montgomery St., San Francisco 



Established 1858 



Private 'Wire Chicago— New York. 

J. C. WILSON 

f New York Stock Exchange 
Member s Chicago Board of Trade 

(. Stock and Bond Exchange, S. F. 
Local and Eastern Stocks and Bonds 



Main Office 

Mills Bide. 

T«l. K«arny *82 



Branch Office 
Hotel Alexandria 
Los Ansrel«s 



FRANK P. MEDINA, ATTORNEY AT LAW 

of Medina and Griffin. Dissolved, remains at the old address, 812-814 
Claus Spreckels Bide. Patents, Trade Marks, Copyrights, Patent Liti- 
gation. MANY YEARS EXPERIENCE WITH PATENT OFFICE EXAMINERS. 



Vanderbilt Estates Company 



Gilt Edge Realty Bonds 



Apply 



Firsl Mortgage 



REALTY EXCHANGE, 1047 PHELAN BUILDING, San Francisco, Cal. 
Home Office— New York City 






Jn.T 31, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



19 



completed during the past year, is one hundred miles long in its 
•ami ligations, and cost $100,000 in gold. During the past year, 
760 acres additional were set out to rubber, and the plans for 
this year include a similar area lo be planted. The total area 
.low actually planted in rubber on the La Zaeualpa properties 
is '.'0,000 acres, considered to be the largest area in one block in 
the world. Mr. Harrison further states that the mill and 
tankage have been increased to accommodate 500 pounds of rub- 
be' per day, and will be increased as requirement demands. 
At the time of Mr. Harrison's departure, ten thousand pounds 
of rubber, the product of the plantation, were in the dryhouse, 
remaining after sixty-five thousand pounds had been shipped 
to market, the total product for the season of 190S. This 
. is an increase over 1907 of fifty per cent, and the indications 
for the present year are in promise of reaching 100,000 pounds. 
The dividend based on last year's product will be 10 per cent. 

These figures and facts are cited to show what is being done 
in the legitimate exploitation of the rubber industry of Mexico 
by American capital. This form of investment is becoming more 
popular with the years, and it is more remunerative than other 
avenues of legitimate character. The Zaeualpa Plantations are 
scientifically, methodically and economically administered. The 
purpose and plan of the company is to safely and soundly con- 
vert the vast area it controls into the profitable culture of rubber, 
which is daily growing in demand, and of which the world at the 
present time furnishes an inadequate supply. It is an essential 
of the age, and conducted on the legitimate basis as is the Zaeu- 
alpa Company, its growth and propagation offers limitless pos- 
sibilities for the investment of capital. 

Eight California counties, so it will 
The Oil Industry. be shown by a statistical bulletin 

soon to be issued by State Miner- 
alogist Aubury, produced 48,306,910 barrels of petroleum in 
the calendar year of 1908, and the value of this vast amount of 
oil reached the handsome and imposing total of $26,566,181. 
The eight counties making this glittering record of the produc- 
tion of one substance are, in order of output, as follows: 

County — Barrels Value 

Kern 18,777,871 $9,388,935 

Fresno 10,725,389 5,898,964 

Santa Barbara 8,847,589 1,423,794 

Los Angeles 6,244,341 1,082,052 

Orange 3,376,689 8,511 

Ventura '.'89,625 '.' 1 ; .'.' 1 9 

Santa Clara 36,400 17,700 

San Luis Obispo 10,000 5, 

The striking feature of Ibis is that the petroleum output is 

not only great in itself, but ii actually outstrips the production of 
gold $6,000,000 according to presen I was a 

large demand for California petroleum in 1908, md this led to 
the increase in price per ban-el. The price, on the a 
greatly varied in different parts of the State. 

In ten years the annual output of California petroleum has 
increased practically twenty-fold, Probably, Auo to the increase 

in petroleum and other sulislanees in the year 1908, a gain in 
grand total for all substances of a mineral nature as con 
with 1907, will be shown thai approximates ".10, 

figures. 



The California State Board of 'trade has jus 

splendid and useful brochure entitled "California: It- Resources 
and Its Possibilities." ["he nseft i -• the publication 
most unlimited, and it should receive wide dissemination in 
rn States or wherever information is wanted about the 
Golden State. 



_ Louis Qassner, so well and favorably known as one of the 

finest furriers on the Pacific Coast, has removed to h 
store at 1 10-111 Geary street. He makes a specialty 
garments to order and is an adept at remodeling an 

tore is his old stand tn ore the lire. It is beautift 
n mahogany, and is a modem up-to-date finished peltry de 
luxe cstablishtu. 




GRAVIES 

test the ability of a cook. 
To insure success use 

LEA&PERRINS 

SAUCE 

THE ORIGINAL. WORCESTERSHIRE 

Soups, Fish, Steaks, Roast 
Meats and many other 
dishes are improved by its 
use. Try it! 

Shun Substitutes. 

John Duncan's Sons, Agts., N. Y. 




**^Your rent money 
buy this bungalow^* 

"The most beautiful lots rn San Mateo are in Hayward Park, 
adjoining thr Peninsula Hotel" said a resident of San Mateo 
recently. If you'll buy one of these lot* we will rrect a bungalow 
upon il according lo your own plans and lei you pay for the 
bungalow at $25 or S.V) a month, just like rent. 

HAYWARD PARK 

it dote to the depot: San Francisco can be reached in .*) minutes 
day or nrght; street work, sidewalks, seven, gas, electricity and 
water have been installed. There is nothing to gvess at. wiah 
for or chance at Hayward Park— Its complete right now — Schools 
and Churches dose at hand — Glorious climate. 

Send for Cirtulm — I hulJiwt trfv-.it in ro* ever JifttxeJ lo. 



BALDWIN & HOWELL 



.uv,; i 
KEARNY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Great Britain is oh: 

in India. The natives are not inelin 

granted home rule and more and better commercial 



MAYERLES GERMAN EYEWATER IS 



OFF Ji I CBIIT or POUCS. Sbb rr»»«-oo -It r rw m- grtmi ptoM- 
«r« to rwoMMad to W* awMic Or. Oaorf* Mayarl* of MO ■art* M 
Sbb FrMcMm I Wn »c«b a*i>c ()**■•» fw la* pwM !•«:■• »*■• 
»nd duitf lb*i ubm •**• <**«*netf Niml ipWiaain. bat m until I 
h*d w i ih it Br • •*■ rt» KbvwU snl r-s-i bin tt >1— in lo bit *7** 
did 1 ftt tttir* MtiifBfti.iB. Mc+t ratpwrtf 

J H A.XDCBSO*. $«rf«aat mt MIm 
- -*es oc Xtenrtai Iy« Waim- bm t*a» 
— ttilriBi ud I *b*I1 ewmmmmmt il a* taw a**r of bII *f* i 




George Mayerle 

t*aa«* rrwBklia SI'* S»n Ptbmmi 



traiy. P CK1XT. H—» «;■ Cwwntj HlBplBtO. Sm Lbmbto. Cal 
dwsB* Imibm Bxpart 0»sirt*B e*acfr wwmkm immrimt 
wistsew of Opuossi tta Mart* Stra**. anapatai BbIbi 

niat.1 ? quju* cti warn By kbo. is* 



80 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 31, 1909 



(All the world is brighter 
when woman's work is lighter. 
ELECTRO 
SILICON 

makes it easy to clean and polish 

L SILVERWARE. 

Send address for fREE SAMPLE, 
or lBcts. In stamps for full Blzed box, post-paid. 
The Electro Silicon Co., 30 Cliff St, New York. 
Sold by Grocers and Druggists. 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, $1,500,000 



Assets, $7,000,000 



California and Sansome Streets. 
San Francisco. California. 



Cash Capital, $200,000. Cash Assets, $629,181.18 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective. Vessels, Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deering, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothln, Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man, F. P. Deering. E. F. Green, James K. Moffitt, J. W. Phillips, 
Henry Hosenfeld. Adolph A. Son. William S. Tevis. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 422 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established I860. 

. Capital Stock Jl.000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,462,739 

Total Cash A3sets 6.366.877 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING. 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. Ltd. 

Of Liverpool. 

Capital S6.700.000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

S20 SANSOME STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

The Wesft Coa& Life Insurance Co. 



San Francisco, Cal. 




IN8VMCB 




Death and taxes have been associated for ages in a common 
saying which cites them as the only exceptions to the uncer- 
tainty of human affairs. It was not, however, until within 
recent years that protection against the results of death were 
made a basis and at the same time a measure for taxation. This 
has been done under the guise of taxing life insurance com- 
panies. Life insurance recognizes the economic value of human 
life, and is merely a method of distributing the financial loss 
caused by the death of a human being. The effect of a tax upon 
insurance is to increase the burden of those who must bear the 
loss. Sound economics would seem to require that the expense 
of government should be met by exacting toll from transactions 
giving rise to an increase of wealth, rather than from one in- 
tended merely for the equalization of losses. Doubtless the 
existing practice has arisen from the belief that the insuring of 
lives is a business affording large profits to those engaged in it, 
and that. to tax the business was to put a tax upon those profits. 
This line of reasoning fails to take cognizance of the fact that 
more than nine-tenths of the outstanding level premium in- 
surance of the United States is participating business. In other 
words, the premiums are not definitely fixed, but are subject 
to reduction to the extent that saving in the rate of mortality 
and other elements of cost, including taxes, can be effected by 
actual experience. But even as to the other one-tenth, the argu- 
ment is fallacious in that it fails to recognize that taxes, together 
with other expenses and costs of insurance, must and do ulti- 
mately fall upon the policy-holder. 

* * * 

The Continental Trust Company of Denver has purchased the 
local agency of Paul B. Gaylord, of that city. Mr. Gaylord 
becomes second vice-president of the institution. *The Gaylord 
agencv was established in 18?4. 

* * * 

Among the subjects to which the beneficent principle of in- 
surance has been successfully applied in recent years is that of 
insuring commercial credits. No application of that principle, 
not even fire insurance, in which its application has received the 
most universal public acceptance, has conferred a greater boon 
upon the business interests of the land. Before credit insurance 
was obtainable, all commercial houses and manufacturing estab- 
lishments were exposed to loss, frequently heavy and often ruin- 
ous, by the failure of debtors to meet their obligations, just 
as their predecessors, in the years before adequate fire insurance 
was obtainable, were subject to loss, by the destruction of their 
property wrought by tire. In credit insurance the same princi- 
ple is applied to distribute the losses of the individual business 

house or manufacturing establishment a ng a multitude of 

policy-holders throughout the whole country, and to distribute 
the heavy financial disasters of years in which hard times prevail 
over periods of years covering times of prosperity and small 

business losses. 



A strong, well managed institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 

National Fire Insurance Company of Hartford 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

CAPITAL $1,000,000.00 

ASSETS 8.260,000.00 

SURPLUS TO POLICY HOLDERS 3,178,468.64 

McNEAR & WAYMAN, GENERAL AGENTS, 

National Building, San Francisco 

Roy C. Ward Jas. K. Polk Jas. W. Dean Geo. E. Billings 

Geo. E. Billings Gompany 

ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED 
31a California Street San Francisco. Cal. Phone Douglas 2283 



The fire insurance offices arc somewhat encouraged by the re- 
sults of the first six months business of the year. The Losses 
have been Ear under lasi year's experience for the same time, and 
as a whole, the income from premiums is reported on the in- 
crease. The latter fact is something of a surprise, and can only 
be accounted for by the suspicion that the total risks have in- 
creased. There has been no general increase of rales anywhere. 
On the contrary, the tendency in rates is downward. The enor- 
mous improvement in risks, and particularly in the introduction 
of sprinklers and other safeguards, have steadily diminished 
rates upon a great number of risks, and the amount is so large 
as to have an appreciable effect upon the whole. Perhaps the 
improvements have operated favorably' upon the losses as well, 
and the companies may be the gainers on that account. 

* * * 

An argument against the charge, frequently heard, that tire 
insurance companies are combined in a trust , exists in the fact 
that the combination companies in one section are among the 
outs in another, and the lambs of the East arc warring tigers in 
the West. In several States, there are more non-union com- 






July 31, 1909 



and California Advertiser 



21 



panics than union, and they defy each other in terms anything 
but friendly. We never hear of the component parts of a real 
trust fighting each other. The essence of such affairs is in the 
non-competition feature. But with fire insurance it appears to 

be quite different. 

* * * 

Under the new standard policy there is no provision for in- 
surance against lightning, a form of insurance very common in 
the East, and Commissioner Wolf has ruled that such insurance 
will not be allowed by attaching a rider lightning clause. 

* * * 

The Continental Fire Insurance Company of New York has 
put in a second local agency at Oakland. S. S. Austin is .in 

charge. 

* * * 

The local agents have all received the new standard policy 
forms from their respective managers, and after the 1st this form 

will be used in California exclusively. 

* * * 

Frank Ely has been elected president of the Santa Ana Un- 
der.writers' Association, C. A. Kingston vice-president and M. 0. 

Dobbins secretary and treasurer. 

* * * 

The Union Assurance Society of London has entered Utah. 

* * * 

Colonel Thompson, of the Dixie Fire, is the guest of Manager 

Cobb of the San Francisco office. 

* * * 

C. J. Stovel, Coast manager of the Sovereign, is entering the 

company in Oregon. 

* * * 

Carl A. Henry has appointed W. S. Gill special agent of the 

Sun and Michigan Fire and Marine for Washington. 

* * * 

The following representatives from the Equitable's San Fran- 
cisco office attended the company's Jubilee Convention at New 
York City, July 2Gth to 28th: Manager A. M. Shields, Agency 
Director Charles A. McLane, Cashier H. C. Donnels, Dr. W. W. 
Underhill, and Agents Lester Steinfeld, J. B. Hayes and Peter 

Murson. 

* * * 

The Metropolitan Life's beautiful new office building on 
Nob Hill is now ready for occupancy. II is one "I the handsom- 
est structures in San Francisco, built entirely of steel, marble, 

terra cotta, plate glass and bronze. 

* * * 

At the annual meeting of the Oakland Board of Fire Under- 
writers, held last week in Oakland. Fred \Y. I.e Ballister was 
elected president; C. E. Schlinghyde secretary, and ('. F. Burks, 

treasurer. The proceedings were terminated l>\ :i banquet 

* * * 

li. ('. Heinsch & C